Cabot Ward

Cabot Ward, Prince Street, Wapping Wharf, City Centre, Bristol, City of Bristol, South West England, England, BS1 4QD, United Kingdom
category: boundary — type: political — OSM: relation 1517923

Items with no match found in OSM

493 items

The Crown, Bristol (Q7728222)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Crown is a historic public house situated on All Saints Lane, Bristol, England and is near to St Nicholas Market. The Crown is located in an area known as "the Old City". The Crown was built in the 18th century and is a Grade II listed building.

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Lewin's Mead (Q6536174)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lewin's Mead is an area of Bristol, England, part of the city ward of Cabot, in the historic centre of the city, lying just outside the former medieval town walls. Several old buildings survive, including the Unitarian Chapel constructed in the late 18th century, an old sugar house and the ancient thoroughfare known as Christmas Steps. The 13th century St Bartholomew's Hospital which became Bristol Grammar School in the 16th century is situated at the bottom of Christmas Steps.\n

"}
Kiss 101 (Q6416898)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Kiss 101 is a former radio station in Bristol, England broadcasting to South Wales and the West of England, playing pop, dance, hip hop, urban, R&B and electronic music. In 2010 the station ceased broadcasting and the National version of Kiss took over the frequencies.\n

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Greyfriars, Bristol (Q5608354)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Greyfriars is the alternate name of a fourteen-story office block built in 1974 in Lewin's Mead in Bristol. It was later used for government offices.

"}
King Street (Q6412075)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

King Street is a 17th-century street in the historic city centre of Bristol, England.\n

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Old Council House, Bristol (Q7083770)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Council House is a building on Corn Street, Bristol, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.

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Matthew (Q6789817)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Matthew is a replica of a caravel sailed by John Cabot in 1497 from Bristol to North America, presumably Newfoundland. After a voyage which had got no further than Iceland, Cabot left again with only one vessel, the Matthew, a small ship (50 tons), but fast and able. The crew consisted of only 18 men. The Matthew departed 2 May 1497. He sailed to Dursey Head (latitude 51°36N), Ireland, from where he sailed due west, expecting to reach Asia. However, landfall was reached in North America on 24 June 1497. His precise landing place is a matter of much controversy, with Cape Bonavista or St. John's in Newfoundland the most likely sites.\n

"}
Heart West Country (Q5692132)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Heart West Country was a regional radio station owned and operated by Global Radio as part of the Heart network, broadcasting to Bristol and Somerset.\n

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Institute of Asset Management (Q6039886)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Institute of Asset Management is a UK-based not-for-profit professional body for those involved in acquisition, operation and care of physical assets, especially critical infrastructure. It was instrumental in the development of the international standard ISO 55000 for asset management.\n

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Former Bank of England, Bristol (Q5470072)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Former Bank of England (grid reference ST592733) is a historic building at 13/14 Broad Street in Bristol, England. It was built as the site of a branch of The Bank of England.

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Former Bristol and West Building (Q5470075)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The former Bristol and West Building on Marsh Street/St Augustine's Parade, Bristol was built in 1967 by Alec French and partners.

"}
Lloyds Bank, Bristol (Q6662855)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lloyds Bank (grid reference ST587729) is an historic building situated at 53 & 55 Corn Street in Bristol, England.\n

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Park Street, Bristol (Q7138050)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Park Street is a major shopping street in Bristol, England, linking the city centre to Clifton. It forms part of the A4018.

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The Exchange, Bristol (Q4096567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Exchange is a Grade I listed building built in 1741–43 by John Wood the Elder, on Corn Street, near the junction with Broad Street in Bristol, England. It was previously used as a corn and general trade exchange but is now used as offices and St Nicholas Market.\n

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14 and 15 King Street, Bristol (Q4549965)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

14 and 15 King Street is the address of an historic warehouse building in King Street, Bristol, England.\n

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32 King Street, Bristol (Q4635017)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

32 King Street is the address of an historic warehouse building in King Street, Bristol, England.\n

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37 and 39 Jamaica Street, Bristol (Q4635859)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

37 and 39 Jamaica Street is the address of an historic carriage-works in Jamaica Street, Stokes Croft, Bristol.\n

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Bristol Harbour Railway (Q917938)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bristol Harbour Railway (known originally as the Harbour Railway) was a standard-gauge industrial railway that served the wharves and docks of Bristol, England. The line, which had a network of approximately 5\xa0mi (8.0\xa0km) of track, connected the Floating Harbour to the GWR mainline at Bristol Temple Meads. Freight could be transported directly by waggons to Paddington Station in London. The railway officially closed in 1964.\n

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St Peter's Hospital (Q7595323)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Peter's Hospital, Bristol could be found to the rear of St Peter's church until it was destroyed in the Bristol Blitz in 1940.\n

"}
University of Bristol Society of Change Ringers (Q7895132)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The University of Bristol Society of Change Ringers (UBSCR) is a change ringing society.\nUBSCR is associated with the University of Bristol and is affiliated to Bristol SU. UBSCR was established in 1943 and has rung bells at St Michael on the Mount Without since 1944.\nSince 1950 there have been over 700 peals rung for the society.\nUBSCR is also affiliated to the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers and sends two representatives to its AGM.\n

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Greyfriars, Bristol (Q15222147)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Greyfriars, in Bristol, England, was a Franciscan friary. The name Greyfriars derived from the grey robes worn by the friars. It was founded at some time before 1234, within the town walls and then moved to Lewin's Mead in 1250. The site included extensive gardens surrounded by a stone wall. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century, the premises were leased to the town council in 1541, who desired to use the stone to make repairs to the town walls, and the harbour facilities. In succeeding centuries many different uses have been made of the site, which is currently occupied by an office block and part of Bristol Dental School.\n

"}
Garment Quarter (Q17027528)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Garment Quarter is an independent designer fashion boutique that was founded in Bristol, England in 2010 by John Reid, Christopher Atkinson and Michael Barker. The brand was recently acquired by Teesside entrepreneurs; Philip Hankinson and Howard Eggleston. The acquisition brought a relocation of the store and head offices to Merchant Street, Bristol.\n

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The Centre, Bristol (Q7721919)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Centre is a public open space in the central area of Bristol, England, created by covering over the River Frome. The northern end of The Centre, known as Magpie Park, is skirted on its western edge by Colston Avenue; the southern end is a larger paved area bounded by St Augustine's Parade to the west, Broad Quay the east, and St Augustine's Reach (part of the Floating Harbour) to the south, and bisected by the 2016 extension of Baldwin Street. The Centre is managed by Bristol City Council.\n

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The Dutch House, Bristol (Q7731263)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Dutch House was a large timber-framed building situated at Nos 1 and 2, High Street Bristol, England. It was a well-known local landmark until its destruction in 1940.\n

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Tower Belle (Q15071918)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tower Belle is a passenger boat based in Bristol Harbour in England. The vessel is operated by the Bristol Packet Boat Trips company on pleasure and educational trips in the City Docks, on the River Avon to the Chequers Inn at Hanham Lock and Beese's Tea Gardens at Conham. Tower Belle was built in 1920 in Newcastle upon Tyne by Armstrong Whitworth, originally known as Wincomblee. In the 1950s and 1960s she worked in London, finally coming to Bristol in 1976.\n

"}
Tyndalls Park (Q7860464)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tyndall's Park is an area of central Bristol, England. It lies north of Park Row and Queen's Road, east of Whiteladies Road and west of St Michael's Hill, between the districts of Clifton, Cotham and Kingsdown. It includes the campus of Bristol Grammar School, and many of the buildings of the University of Bristol.\n

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Whitefriars, Bristol (Q7995927)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Whitefriars was a Carmelite friary on the lower slopes of St Michael's Hill, Bristol, England. It was established in 1267; in subsequent centuries a friary church was built and extensive gardens developed. The establishment was dissolved in 1538.\n

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University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (Q17028004)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust is a National Health Service foundation trust in Bristol, England. The trust runs Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol Eye Hospital, South Bristol Community Hospital, Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, St Michael's Hospital and the University of Bristol Dental Hospital.\n

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BBC Natural History Unit (Q4834859)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The BBC Natural History Unit (NHU) is a department of the BBC which produces television, radio and online content with a natural history or wildlife theme. It is best known for its highly regarded nature documentaries, including The Blue Planet and Planet Earth, and has a long association with David Attenborough's authored documentaries, their notably called Life on Earth.\n

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Blackfriars, Bristol (Q4922883)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Blackfriars, Bristol was a Dominican priory in Broadmead, Bristol, England. It was founded by Maurice de Gaunt in 1227 or 1228. Llywelyn ap Dafydd, son of Dafydd ap Gruffydd, the last native Prince of Wales, was buried in the cemetery of the priory. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, surviving parts of the priory became a guildhall for the Smiths and Cutlers Company, the Bakers Company, a workhouse and then a meeting house for the Quakers. In the 20th century it has housed the local Register Office, a theatre company and a restaurant.\n

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Bullock's Park (Q4996977)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nBullock's Park was an estate in Bristol, England between College Green and Brandon Hill. The last owner, Nathaniel Day, obtained permission to develop it in 1740 although building did not begin until 1761. The area now corresponds to Park Street, Berkeley Square and Berkeley Crescent.\n

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Bewell's Cross (Q4899744)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nBewell's Cross is a lost monument which marked the boundary of the county of Bristol when this was created in 1373. It stood in or close to the Gallows Field at the top of St Michael's Hill, the former principal road from Bristol to Wales via the Severn ferry at Aust. It was removed in or before the 19th century, and a stone claimed to be taken from its pedestal is built into the wall of Cotham Church, marked by a plaque.\n

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Christmas Steps (Q5111430)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Christmas Steps is an historic street in the city centre of Bristol, England.\n

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Bathurst Basin (Q4869102)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bathurst Basin is a small triangular basin adjoining the main harbour of the city of Bristol, England. The basin takes its name from Charles Bathurst, who was a Bristol MP in the early 19th century.

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Bristol Ferry Boats (Q4968899)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bristol Ferry Boats is a brand of water bus services operating around Bristol Harbour in the centre of the English city of Bristol, using a fleet of distinctive yellow and blue painted ferry boats. The services were formerly owned by the Bristol Ferry Boat Company, but are now the responsibility of Bristol Community Ferry Boats, a community interest company that acquired the fleet of the previous company.

'}
Broad Street, Bristol (Q4971942)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broad Street, along with High Street, Wine Street and Corn Street, is one of the four original streets that have made up the city of Bristol since Saxon times, when it was the burgh of Brycgstow.

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Brown's Restaurant (Q4975958)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Brown's Restaurant (grid reference ST580732) is on Queens Road, Bristol, England. It is currently occupied by the restaurant chain of the same name, Browns Restaurants.

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St Augustine the Less Church, Bristol (Q7592562)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St Augustine the Less was a Church of England parish church in Bristol, England, first attested in 1240, rebuilt in 1480, damaged in 1940 by fire, and demolished in 1962. It took its name from its proximity to the church of the Abbey of St Augustine (St Augustine the Great), which is now Bristol Cathedral.\n

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Siege of Bristol (Q7509888)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Siege of Bristol lasted from the 18th to 26th of October 1326, and saw the city besieged by the forces of Isabella of France and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March during the Despenser wars. Isabella and Mortimer's forces fought the garrison under Hugh Despenser the Elder for eight days in a siege. They captured the fort after several attacks.\n

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St Mary Magdalen Nunnery, Bristol (Q7594569)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Mary Magdalen Nunnery (grid reference ST585733) was a priory of Augustinian canonesses in Kingsdown, Bristol, England. It was founded c.\xa01173 and dissolved in 1536. St\xa0Mary Magdalen is remembered in the name of Maudlin Street; the nunnery was located near to the corner of Maudlin Street and St\xa0Michael's Hill, which was later the site of the King\xa0David Inn.

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Robinson's Warehouse, Bristol (Q7352953)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Robinson's Warehouse (grid reference ST585725) is a warehouse on Bathurst Parade, on the Floating Harbour in Bristol, England.\n

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Redcliffe Hall, Bristol (Q7305563)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Redcliffe Hall was an early purpose-built playhouse on Redcliffe Hill, Bristol, England operating in the 17th century. It was built by Richard Barker, certainly before 1637 and possibly as early as 1604. Together with the Wine Street playhouse, Bristol thus had two purpose-built theatres, more than any other provincial city of the time.\n

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New Bridewell Tower (Q24993810)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New Bridewell Tower (or New Bridewell) is a 16 storey student accommodation building located in Central Bristol, England. The £30 million development consists of demolishing the former 1970’s New Bridewell Police headquarters and the construction of a 499-bed student accommodation building. The development also includes a public square, which provides a link to the nearby old Magistrates court redevelopment, and 600 sq metres of commercial floor space and public realm improvements.

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Centre for Device Thermography and Reliability (Q18162474)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Centre for Device Thermography and Reliability is a research facility at the University of Bristol, a research university located in Bristol, United Kingdom. Founded in 2001, by Professor Kuball the centre is engaged in thermal and reliability research of semiconductor devices, in particular for microwave and power electronic devices. It is housed in the H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, a noted physics laboratory associated with the Physics department of the university. CDTR is noted for developing an integrated Raman-IR thermography technique to probe self-heating in silicon, GaAs and other devices. This enables unique thermal analysis of semiconductor devices on a detailed level not possible before. These techniques are critical in understanding the reliability of Compound semiconductor devices applicable in power and microwave devices and in the long term as a viable replacement for Silicon devices as it approaches the end of scaling.

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Creative England (Q22000840)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Creative England is a not-for-profit organisation that supports the creative industries in England. The business promotes the development of creative companies, which in turn support business across games, film, creative and digital media as well as production services. The company works in partnership with the British Film Institute, has offices in Bristol and Salford, and operates outside of the city of London.

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Marsh Street (Q28792252)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Marsh Street is a street in the city of Bristol, England.\n

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Corn Street (Q5171040)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Corn Street, together with Broad Street, Wine Street and High Street, is one of the four cross streets which met at the Bristol High Cross, the heart of Bristol, England when it was a walled mediaeval town. From this crossroads Corn Street and its later extension Clare Street runs downhill approximately 325m south-westwards to The Centre.

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Redcliffe Caves (Q30625218)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Redcliffe Caves are a series of man made tunnels beneath the Redcliffe area of Bristol, England.\n

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XMOS (Q64698)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

XMOS is a fabless semiconductor company that develops voice solutions, audio products, and multicore microcontrollers capable of concurrently executing real-time tasks, DSP, edge AI processing, and control flow. XMOS microcontrollers are distinguished by their deterministic (predictable) behavior.\n

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7 and 8 King Street, Bristol (Q4643904)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

7 and 8 King Street are a pair of historic houses situated on King Street in Bristol, England.\n

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Old Library (Q7084369)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Library (grid reference ST587727) is a historic building on the north side of King Street, Bristol, England. It was built in 1738–40 and has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.

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Berkeley Crescent (Q17553227)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Berkeley Crescent is a late 18th-century crescent of six Georgian houses with a private communal garden.\n

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Bristol Industrial Museum (Q4968934)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Bristol Industrial Museum was a museum in Bristol, England, located on Prince's Wharf beside the Floating Harbour and which closed in 2006. On display were items from Bristol's industrial past – including aviation, car and bus manufacture, and printing – and exhibits documenting Bristol's maritime history. The museum was managed by Bristol City Council along with nearby preserved industrial relics along Prince's Wharf, including the Bristol Harbour Railway, cranes and a small fleet of preserved vessels. The railway, cranes and vessels all now form part of the working exhibits at M Shed Museum.\n

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Diocese of Bristol (Q3028537)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Diocese of Bristol is a Church of England diocese in the Province of Canterbury, England. It is based in the city of Bristol and covers South Gloucestershire and parts of north Wiltshire, as far east as Swindon. The diocese is headed by the Bishop of Bristol and the Episcopal seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, commonly known as Bristol Cathedral.\n

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Bristol Archives (Q16953828)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bristol Archives (formerly Bristol Record Office) was established in 1924. It was the first borough record office in the United Kingdom, since at that time there was only one other local authority record office (Bedfordshire) in existence. It looks after the official archives of the City of Bristol, besides collecting and preserving many other records relating to the city and surrounding area for current and future generations to consult. It moved from the Council House to newly converted premises in the former B Bond Warehouse in 1992. The office is formally recognised by the Lord Chancellor for holding public records, and it acts as a diocesan record office for the Diocese of Bristol.\n

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University College, Bristol (Q7894606)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

University College, Bristol was an educational institution which existed from 1876 to 1909. It was the predecessor institution to the University of Bristol, which gained a royal charter in 1909. During its time the college mainly served the middle classes of Bristol, and catered for young men who had entered a family business and needed a greater understanding of scientific topics.\n

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Statue of Edmund Burke (Q26571134)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Statue of Edmund Burke in Bristol, England is a commemorative bronze sculpture of Edmund Burke (1729–1797) by James Havard Thomas, created in 1894. It is grade II listed, and stands in The Centre. A second copy of the sculpture stands on Massachusetts Avenue in Washington, D.C., United States. It has been said incorrectly that the statue is a copy of an 1858 marble work in the Palace of Westminster; that marble statue is by William Theed, the younger.

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Sarah Records (Q3473424)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sarah Records was a British independent record label active in Bristol between 1987 and 1995, best known for its recordings of indie pop, which it released mostly on 7" singles. On reaching the catalogue number SARAH 100 the label celebrated its centenary by throwing a party and shutting itself down. In March 2015, NME declared Sarah to be the second greatest indie label of all time.

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Everard's Printing Works (Q5470087)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Former Everard's Printing Works (grid reference ST588730) is at 37-38 Broad Street in Bristol, England. It has been designated as a Grade II* listed building.

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Merchant Venturers Almshouses (Q6818409)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Merchant Venturers Almshouses (grid reference ST587727) is a historic building on King Street, Bristol, England. It has been designated as a Grade II* listed building.

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St Nicholas' Almshouses (Q15979456)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Nicholas' Almshouses (grid reference ST587727) is a historic building on King Street, Bristol, England.\n

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Northern Stormwater Interceptor, Bristol (Q15262576)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Northern Storm Water Interceptor (NSWI), is a large stormwater tunnel that acts as a flood prevention measure for Bristol, England.\n

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Whitefield's Tabernacle, Bristol (Q7995849)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Whitefield's Tabernacle, a church in Penn Street, Bristol, opened in 1753 for the followers of George Whitefield.\n

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Christ Church with St Ewen (Q5108837)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Christ Church with St Ewen (grid reference ST588730) is a Church of England parish church in Broad Street, Bristol, England.

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Lewin's Mead Unitarian meeting house (Q6536176)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lewin's Mead Unitarian meeting house is a former Unitarian church in Bristol, England.\n

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Quakers Friars (Q7268584)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Quakers Friars (grid reference ST592733) is a historic building in Broadmead, Bristol, England.\n

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Sack Friary, Bristol (Q7396801)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nSack Friary, Bristol was a friary in Bristol, England. It was established in 1266 and dissolved in 1286.

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St James' Presbyterian Church of England, Bristol (Q7593459)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St James' Presbyterian Church (also known as Welsh Congregational Church) was a church in The Haymarket, St James, Bristol, England.\n

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River Frome (Q2155471)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Frome , historically the Froom, is a river that rises in Dodington Park, South Gloucestershire, and flows south westerly through Bristol, joining the former course of the river Avon in Bristol's Floating Harbour. It is approximately 20 miles (32\xa0km) long, and the mean flow at Frenchay is 60 cubic feet per second (1.7\xa0m3/s). The name Frome is shared with several other rivers in South West England and means 'fair, fine, brisk’. The river is known locally in east Bristol as the Danny.\n

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Cheese Lane Shot Tower (Q19654779)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cheese Lane Shot Tower is a grade II listed shot tower in the English city of Bristol. It was built in 1969, and was a replacement for an earlier shot tower, the very first such tower ever built. It now forms part of an office development called Vertigo, and is located on the north bank of the Floating Harbour upstream of Castle Park. There is no public access to the interior of the tower.

'}
Redcliffe Shot Tower (Q19820534)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Redcliffe Shot Tower was a historic shot tower in the English city of Bristol. It was the progenitor of many similar towers built around the world. The tower stood at the corner of Redcliffe Hill and Redcliffe Parade, in the suburb of Redcliffe, between the years of 1782 and 1968.

'}
Graphcore (Q38251361)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Graphcore is a semiconductor company that develops accelerators for AI and machine learning. It aims to make a massively parallel Intelligence Processing Unit (IPU) that holds the complete machine learning model inside the processor.

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Young Bristol (Q55099297)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Young Bristol is a charity in Bristol, England providing activities for young people in the city.\n

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17 King Street, Bristol (Q4553541)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

17 King Street is a historic building situated on King Street in the English city of Bristol. Along with the adjacent 18 King Street, it houses a public house called The Famous Royal Naval Volunteer.\n

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Old Post Office, Bristol (Q7084761)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Post Office (grid reference ST587729) is a historic building at 48 Corn Street in Bristol, England.\n

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Academy Cinema (Q4671345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Academy Cinema (grid reference ST590744) is a historic building on Cheltenham Road in the Stokes Croft area of Bristol, England. Since its construction in 1914 it has been used for many purposes. It is a Grade II listed building.

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Bristol Guildhall (Q26268208)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bristol Guildhall is a municipal building in Broad Street, Bristol, England. It is a Grade II* listed building.

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Prince's Theatre (Q39134495)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Prince's Theatre was a theatre on Park Row in Bristol in England which was built in 1867 and was destroyed by bombing in 1940 in the Bristol Blitz during World War II. Owned by members of the Chute family for most of its existence, at one time the theatre was the Bristol venue for many of the country's leading touring actors and theatrical companies in addition to being one of the most renowned pantomime houses in the country before briefly becoming a music hall and latterly a cinema. The actors Henry Irving and Ellen Terry made their last appearance together under Irving's management at the Prince's Theatre in The Merchant of Venice in 1902.

"}