Upper West Side

Upper West Side, Manhattan Community Board 7, Manhattan, New York City, New York, 10025, United States of America
category: place — type: neighbourhood — OSM: relation 7218315

Items with no match found in OSM

101 items

Bretton Hall, Manhattan (Q4962477)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bretton Hall is a twelve-story residential building at 2350 Broadway, spanning from West 85th to 86th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

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New York City Opera (Q181813)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York City Opera (NYCO) is an American opera company located in Manhattan in New York City. The company has been active from 1943 through 2013 (when it filed for bankruptcy), and again since 2016 when it was revived.\n

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Broadway United Church of Christ (Q4972534)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broadway United Church of Christ is a Congregationalist Church located on West 86th Street, between Broadway and West End Avenue on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.\n

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Continental Baths (Q5165255)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Continental Baths was a gay bathhouse in the basement of The Ansonia Hotel in New York City, which was opened in 1968 by Steve Ostrow. It was advertised as reminiscent of "the glory of ancient Rome". The documentary film Continental by Malcolm Ingram covers the height of the club\'s popularity through the early 1970s.

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First Baptist Church in the City of New York (Q5452454)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The First Baptist Church in the City of New York is a Christian congregation based in a sanctuary built in 1890–93 at the intersection of Broadway and West 79th Street in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The church is a conservative, independent, evangelistic, mission-oriented church in fellowship with the Southern Baptist Convention.

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250 West 90th Street (Q4632057)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

250 West 90th Street is a New York City apartment building located at Broadway and West 90th Street in New York City.

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Plato's Retreat (Q7202411)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Plato's Retreat was a swingers' club in Manhattan, New York City, United States, operating from 1977 until 1985 and catering to heterosexual couples and bisexual women.\n

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Sawkill (Q7428650)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Sawkill or Saw-kill (the Dutch place-name for Saw Mill Creek) was the largest hydrological network on Manhattan island prior to the founding of the Dutch colony of New Netherland in 1624. This 44,980-foot-long (13,710\xa0m) stream began "within four blocks of the Hudson River":

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86th Street (Q4644947)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

86th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 81st Street. The next northbound stop was 93rd Street.\n

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353 Central Park West (Q4635498)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

353 Central Park West is an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It is located at the corner of Central Park West and West 95th Street.\n

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Millennium Tower (Q18619416)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Millennium Tower is a mixed-use building in New York City. With the address of 101 West 67th Street, the building occupies the full block bounded by Broadway, Columbus Avenue, and 67th and 68th Streets. It was erected in 1994 and is one of a trio of buildings by Millennium Partners known collectively as Lincoln Square. The building was designed by James Carpenter.

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96th Street (Q277081)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

96th Street is a major two-way street on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side sections of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs in two major sections: between the FDR Drive and Fifth Avenue on the Upper East Side, and between Central Park West and Henry Hudson Parkway on the Upper West Side. The two segments are connected by the 97th Street transverse across Central Park, which links the disconnected segments of 96th and 97th Streets on each side.\n

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Columbus Square (Q5150122)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Columbus Square consists of five luxury rental buildings located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, in New York City. The real estate development runs from 97th Street to 100th Street between Columbus Avenue and Amsterdam Avenue, with over 300,000 square feet (28,000\xa0m2) of retail space. Initially known as Columbus Village, the five buildings include: 808 Columbus Avenue on the west side of Columbus Avenue between 97th and 100th Streets; 775 Columbus Avenue at the northeast corner of 97th Street and Columbus Avenue; 795 Columbus Avenue on the east side of Columbus Avenue between 98th and 99th Streets, 805 Columbus Avenue on the southeast corner of 100th Street and Columbus Avenue, and 801 Amsterdam Avenue on the southeast corner of 100th Street and Amsterdam Avenue. In 2009, according to the New York Daily News, Columbus Square was the largest residential development currently being built in Manhattan.

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Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse (Q14706946)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse was an 11-story structure built on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, in 1925. It fronted seventy-four feet on Amsterdam Avenue between 82nd Avenue and 83rd Street. Continuing in its rear for one hundred feet, the edifice possessed an L fronting twenty-five feet on West 83rd Street. Aside from warehouse space, the Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse contained exhibit, sales rooms, and other facilities.

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99th Street (Q4646345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

99th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 93rd Street. The next northbound stop was 104th Street.\n

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Ichimura at Brushstroke (Q19876430)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brushstroke was a Japanese kaiseki restaurant located on Hudson Street in Manhattan, New York City. The owners of the restaurant are French chef David Bouley and Yoshiki Tsuji, who is president of Tsuji culinary school in Osaka Japan. Sushi Ichimura at brushstroke was opened inside of the restaurant, brushstoke in 2012. They had the head chef Toyko trained Eiji Ichimura, who has been cooking sushi for over 40 years.

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West Side Community Garden (Q7986500)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Side Community Garden is a privately owned park in Manhattan, New York City, United States. It is located between West 89th Street and West 90th Street in the middle of the block between Amsterdam Avenue and Columbus Avenue.

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murder of John Lennon (Q2341090)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On the evening of 8 December 1980, English musician John Lennon, formerly of the Beatles, was fatally shot in the archway of the Dakota, his residence in New York City. The perpetrator was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan who had travelled from Hawaii. Chapman stated that he was angered by Lennon\'s lifestyle and public statements, especially his much-publicized remark about the Beatles being "more popular than Jesus" and the lyrics of his later songs "God" and "Imagine". Chapman also said he was inspired by the fictional character Holden Caulfield from J. D. Salinger\'s 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye.\n

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Atlantic Studios (Q3501052)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Atlantic Studios was the recording studio of Atlantic Records. Although this recording studio was located at 1841 Broadway (at the corner of 60th Street), in New York City, Atlantic Recording Studios was initially located at 234 West 56th Street from November 1947 until mid-1956. When the Shorty Rogers and His Giants disc of 33.33 rpm called Martians Come Back! was issued in August 1956, the address of Atlantic Recording Studios had relocated to 157 W 57th Street. The studio was the first to record in stereo due to the efforts of Tom Dowd.\n

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81st Street (Q4644567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

81st Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 72nd Street. The next northbound stop was 86th Street.\n

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McBurney School (Q6800060)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

McBurney School was a college preparatory school in Manhattan run by the YMCA of Greater New York. Its name commemorates Robert Ross McBurney, a prominent New York YMCA leader during the late 19th century.\n

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St. Nicholas Rink (Q7590843)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Nicholas Rink, also called the St. Nicholas Arena, was an indoor ice rink, and later a boxing arena in New York, New York, from 1896 until 1962. The rink was one of the earliest indoor ice rinks made of mechanically frozen ice in North America, (others including the North Avenue Ice Palace in Baltimore, Maryland and the Ice Palace in New York, both opened in 1894), enabling a longer season for skating sports. It was demolished in the 1980s.\n

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Apthorp Farm (Q4782245)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Apthorp Farm that lay on Manhattan\'s Upper West Side straddled the old Bloomingdale Road, laid out in 1728, which was re-surveyed as The "Boulevard" – now Upper Broadway. It was the largest block of real estate remaining from the "Bloomingdale District", a rural suburb of 18th-century New York City. Legal disputes between the eventual heirs of the Loyalist Charles Ward Apthorp and purchasers of parcels of real estate held in abeyance the speculative development of the area between 89th and 99th Streets, from Central Park to the Hudson River until final judgment was awarded in July 1910; at that time the New York Times estimated its worth at $125,000,000.

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Power Memorial Academy (Q7236369)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Power Memorial Academy (PMA) was an all-boys Catholic high school in New York City that operated from 1931 through 1984. It was a basketball powerhouse, producing several NBA players including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Len Elmore, Mario Elie, Chris Mullin, as well as NBA referee Dick Bavetta and a record 71-game winning streak. Its 1964 basketball team was named "The #1 High School Team of The Century".\n

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Pomander Walk (Q7227208)
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Pomander Walk is a cooperative apartment complex in Manhattan, New York City, located on the Upper West Side between Broadway and West End Avenue. The complex consists of 27 buildings. Four buildings face West 94th Street, and another seven face West 95th Street, including one with a return facade on West End Avenue. The "Walk" itself, consisting of two rows of eight buildings facing each other across a narrow courtyard, runs through the middle of the block between 94th and 95th, with a locked gate at each end. Each building originally had one apartment on each floor. In recent years, some buildings have been reconfigured to serve as single-family homes.\n

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93rd Street (Q14706153)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

93rd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 86th Street. The next northbound stop was 99th Street.\n

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The Clebourne (Q5131022)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cleburne Building (also known as 924 West End Avenue) is an apartment building located at the northeast corner of West End Avenue and West 105th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

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Stella Adler Studio of Acting (Q7607037)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stella Adler Studio of Acting (formerly Stella Adler Conservatory) is a prestigious acting school that was founded by actress and teacher Stella Adler. The Stella Adler Studio of Acting has two locations: its original New York City conservatory, founded in 1949, and the Art of Acting Studio in Los Angeles. The Stella Adler Studio of Acting in New York is not affiliated with the Stella Adler Academy & Theatre, which Adler established in Los Angeles in 1985. The Stella Adler Studio and the Juilliard School currently boast the lowest program acceptance rates in the professional acting world. The studio only accepts sixteen students a semester into its professional conservatory program.

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Leake and Watts Services (Q6509321)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Leake and Watts Services, Inc. is a not-for-profit social services agency in New York City that provides services for children and families in the areas of foster care, adoption, special education, Head Start and other related subjects. It has facilities in Yonkers in Westchester County, New York, and in the Bronx and upper Manhattan in New York City. The agency began as the Leake and Watts Orphan Asylum in Manhattan.

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Episcopal Diocese of New York (Q1347304)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Episcopal Diocese of New York is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, encompassing the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island in New York City, and the New York state counties of Westchester, Rockland, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Sullivan, and Ulster.\n

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St. Agnes Boys High School (Q7586706)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Saint Agnes Boys High School was a small, all-boys, private Catholic high school on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It was run by the Marist Brothers in conjunction with the Archdiocese of New York. The mascot of St. Agnes was the stag.\n

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66th Street (Q4642231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

66th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had two track and two side platforms over the lower level local tracks. The station closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was 59th Street. The next southbound express stop was 34th Street for Ninth Avenue trains, and 50th Street for IRT Sixth Avenue Line express trains. The next northbound local stop was 72nd Street. The next northbound express stop was 116th Street. The express run from this stop to 116th Street was the longest express segment out of all New York City elevated lines, bypassing seven local stations.\n

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72nd Street (Q4643233)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

72nd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 66th Street. The next northbound stop was 81st Street.\n

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William E. Macaulay Honors College (Q8008270)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

William E. Macaulay Honors College, commonly referred to as Macaulay Honors College or simply Macaulay, is a selective, co-degree-granting honors college for students at the City University of New York (CUNY) system in New York City. The college is known primarily for offering full-tuition scholarships to all of its undergraduates (or a substantial partial scholarship to out-of-state students). For the class of 2020, there were 6,272 applicants and the number of enrolled students was 537. The average high school GPA and SAT for the class of 2020 was 94.1 and 1414, respectively.\nSince 2016, the college has consistently received the highest rating for a public university honors college. Macaulay students have earned more than 250 prestigious awards including 37 Fulbright Fellowships, 5 Truman Scholarships and 28 National Science Foundation grants.\n

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Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School (Q5341475)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School is a New York City Public Alternative High School located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Known for many years simply as "West Side High," it was renamed in honor of the school\'s longtime principal following his unexpected death in 2001.\n

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Abraham Joshua Heschel School (Q4668947)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Abraham Joshua Heschel School (AJHS) is a pluralistic Nursery to 12 Jewish day school in New York City named in memory of one of the great Jewish leaders, teachers, and activists of the 20th century and dedicated to the values that characterized Rabbi Heschel's life: intellectual exploration, integrity, love of the Jewish people and tradition, and a commitment to social justice. The Heschel School is a pluralistic, egalitarian community that includes families from a wide range of Jewish backgrounds, practices and beliefs.\n

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Bradford Hotel (Q4954698)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bradford Hotel is a New York City establishment which opened on October 18, 1924, at 206 - 22 West 70th Street in Manhattan. It cost $2 million to build and was designed by George F. Pelham. It was owned by the Lapidus Engineering Company, the same firm that controlled the Hotel Oxford, which opened in 1923.\nThe apartment hotel is sixteen stories and occupied a plot 150 by 100 between Broadway (Manhattan) and West End Avenue. It contains four hundred rooms., each with private bathrooms, kitchenettes, and many with terraces. It was being converted to a project for the elderly by January 1970.

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Institute for American Values (Q6039148)
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The Institute for American Values is a New York City think tank focusing on family and social issues.

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Manhattan Avenue (Q17347126)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Not included in the original Commissioners' Plan of 1811, Manhattan Avenue in Manhattan Valley lies between Columbus Avenue (9th Ave.) and Central Park West/Frederick Douglass Boulevard (8th Ave.), extending from 100th Street to 124th Street, at which point it merges with St. Nicholas Avenue. It saw its first buildings in 1885, a group of row houses on its western side. These buildings were brick with stone and terra-cotta trim. The now defunct New York Cancer Hospital, a landmark since 1976, is nearby on Central Park West.\n

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Harperly Hall (Q5663468)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harperly Hall (also known as 41 Central Park West) is an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The building is located along prestigious Central Park West and was built in 1910, it opened in 1911. Cast in the Arts and Crafts style, a rarity for New York City, Harperly Hall was designed by Henry W. Wilkinson. The structure was listed as a contributing property to the U.S. federal government designated Central Park West Historic District in 1982 when the district joined the National Register of Historic Places. At one time it was known as the Madonna building as Sean Penn and singer Madonna lived there together, then she sans Penn, then owned in absentia by the entertainer, and finally the material girl selling the spread in 2013 for $16 million US.

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Theatre on Film and Tape Archive (Q17145833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Theatre on Film and Tape Archive (TOFT), a collection within the Billy Rose Theatre Division of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, produces video recordings of New York and regional theater productions, and provides research access at its Lucille Lortel screening room. The core of the collection consists of live recordings of Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, with some additional productions from professional regional theaters. The Archive also records interviews and dialogues with notable theater professionals.\n

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LaGuardia New Music Ensemble (Q16998975)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The LaGuardia New Music Ensemble is an ever-changing composition collective at New York's LaGuardia School for Music and Art. It is notable for being the incubator of multiple industry professionals and one of the foremost popular music composition seminars in the country. The ensemble is best known for its collaborations with the NPR program Radiolab.

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Alice Tully Hall (Q3846032)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Alice Tully Hall is a concert hall at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City. It is named for Alice Tully, a New York performer and philanthropist whose donations assisted in the construction of the hall. Tully Hall is located within the Juilliard Building, a Brutalist structure, which was designed by renowned architect Pietro Belluschi, and completed and opened in 1969. Since its opening, it has hosted numerous performances and events, including the New York Film Festival. Tully Hall seats 1,086 patrons.

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Museum of Biblical Art (Q6940781)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) was a Museum in New York; it closed in 2015.\n

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Claremont Riding Academy (Q12055062)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Claremont Riding Academy, originally Claremont Stables, 175 West 89th Street, between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues on Manhattan's Upper West Side, was designed by Frank A. Rooke and built in 1892. Closed in 2007, Claremont was the oldest continuously operated equestrian stable in New York City and the last public stable in Manhattan. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and designated a New York City Landmark in 1990. Since 2010, it has belonged to the Stephen Gaynor School.\n

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West Side (Q500601)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The West Side of Manhattan refers to the side of Manhattan Island which abuts the Hudson River and faces New Jersey. Fifth Avenue, Central Park, and lower Broadway separate it from the East Side. The major neighborhoods on the West Side are (from north to south) Inwood, Hudson Heights, Washington Heights, West Harlem, Morningside Heights, Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, Hell's Kitchen, Chelsea, West Village, SoHo, and Tribeca. The 8th Avenue and West Side subway lines connect all parts of the West Side. The main north-south roads servicing the West Side are the Henry Hudson Parkway in the north, and the West Side Highway in the south. The Hudson River Greenway separates them from the west shore of the island.\n

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Dauphin Hotel (Q5228071)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Dauphin Hotel was an establishment located on the west block front of Broadway between 66th Street and 67th Street. In 1958, the ballroom of the hotel was behind Julia Murphy's Bar. The Dauphin Hotel was demolished as part of the excavation for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. By 1964, the site was taken by the Empire Mutual Insurance Group building. This edifice also occupied the space where the Marie Antoinette Hotel previously stood.\n

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91st Street (Q999188)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

91st Street was a local station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at 91st Street and Broadway on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The station opened on October 27, 1904, as part of the first IRT line. It closed on February 2, 1959, due to its proximity to the 96th Street station, whose platforms had been lengthened southward toward the 91st Street station.\n

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360 Central Park West (Q4635636)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

360 Central Park West is a 16-story apartment high-rise on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was designed by Rosario Candela. It is listed as a contributing property to the Central Park West Historic District.\n

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The Center School (Q7721878)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
  • \n
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Schinasi House (Q7431328)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Schinasi House is a 12,000-square-foot (1,100\xa0m2), 35-room marble mansion on Riverside Drive in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1907 for Sephardic Jewish tobacco baron Morris Schinasi. The mansion was designed by Carnegie Hall architect William Tuthill and reportedly retains almost all of its historic detail, including a Prohibition-era trap door that once extended all the way to the river.

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Mikell's (Q6849430)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mikell's was a jazz club on the corner of 97th Street and Columbus Avenue, in New York City.\n

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Yeshivat Hadar (Q16132567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Yeshivat Hadar is a traditional egalitarian yeshiva on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The Yeshiva offers both summer and year-long fellowships for students to learn full-time in the yeshiva setting. Prominent rabbis associated with the Yeshiva include co-founders Rabbi Shai Held, Rabbi Elie Kaunfer, and Rabbi Ethan Tucker.

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The Anderson School (Q7713696)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Anderson School PS 334 is a New York City school for children in grades kindergarten through 8 from the city's five boroughs. It was founded thirty-three years ago (September 1987) as The Anderson Program under the stewardship of PS 9. The New York City Department of Education (DOE) spun off Anderson in July 2005 as a stand-alone school — PS 334.\n

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The School at Columbia University (Q7762527)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The School at Columbia University is a private K-8 school affiliated with Columbia University. Students are drawn equally from the Morningside Heights, Manhattan/Upper West Side/Harlem community and from the faculty and staff of the university. Currently there are three divisions: Primary (K-2), Intermediate (3-5) and Middle (6-8). Each division has its own Division Head and there is one Head of School. It is located at 110th Street and Broadway in the New York City borough of Manhattan.\n

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St. Agnes Chapel (Q7586712)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Agnes Chapel was an Upper West Side Episcopal "plant chapel" of Trinity Church (New York City), one of many. It was located at 121-147 West 91st Street, between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues. It was at first reused by its parish school and then demolished for a gymnasium in the 1940s.

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Friends of Oaxacan Folk Art (Q16993833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Friends of Oaxacan Folk Art is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the traditional handcrafts and folk art of the Mexican state of Oaxaca, especially to encourage young artisans to continue family and regional traditions.

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Ansche Chesed (Q4770536)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ansche Chesed is a synagogue on the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan.\n

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104th Street (Q4546552)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

104th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 99th Street. The next northbound stop was 116th Street station until June 3, 1903 and then 110th Street. This had a view of the Suicide Curve at 110th Street.\n

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deaths of Lucia and Leo Krim (Q6937968)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lucia and Leo Krim, ages 6 and 2, respectively, were murdered in the late afternoon of October 25, 2012, at the La Rochelle apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. The children's part-time caretaker, Yoselyn Ortega, was convicted of stabbing the children to death with kitchen knives while their mother Marina Krim and three-year-old sister Nessie were a few blocks away at a swimming lesson. Upon returning home, their mother and sister found Lucia and Leo dead in a bathtub at the family apartment. Ortega then began stabbing herself repeatedly in the neck and throat. She survived the self-inflicted wounds.\n

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New York Philharmonic Orchestra (Q471154)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc., globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the "Big Five". The Philharmonic\'s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York\'s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

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520 West End Avenue (Q4640142)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

520 West End Avenue, also known as the John B. and Isabella Leech Residence, is a landmarked mansion on West End Avenue, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.\n

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Broadway (Q11260)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broadway () is a road in the U.S. state of New York. Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13\xa0mi (21\xa0km) through the borough of Manhattan and 2\xa0mi (3.2\xa0km) through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18\xa0mi (29\xa0km) through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.

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Innovation Diploma Plus High School (Q16892674)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Innovation Diploma Plus High School is located on 145 West 84th Street within the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It is also one of the four schools that are located in the Louis D. Brandeis High School Campus.

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Septuagesimo Uno (Q7452367)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Septuagesimo Uno is a 0.04-acre (160\xa0m2) park in the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located on 71st Street between West End Avenue to the west and the intersection of Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue to the east. The park\'s name is Latin for "seventy-first". The park is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.\n

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Calder's set for Socrate (Q16890073)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The original Decor for Satie\'s "Socrate" was designed by mobile artist Alexander Calder for a touring performance of Erik Satie’s symphonic drama Socrate in 1936. It was a mobile set considered by Virgil Thomson as one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century theatre design. It consisted of three elements: a red disc, interlocking steel hoops, and a vertical rectangle, black on one side and white on the other, against a blue backdrop. Destroyed in a fire in 1936, the decor was recreated by Walter Hatke in 1976 for a performance in New York.

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Solomon Schechter High School of New York (Q7558739)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Solomon Schechter High School of New York was a coeducational Jewish high school located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The school, which was affiliated with the Conservative Movement of Judaism and a member of the Solomon Schechter Day School Association, merged in 2006 with the New Jersey-based Schechter Regional High School, to form the Metro Schechter Academy, which in turn closed permanently in 2007. SSHSNY was a laboratory school of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and provided students with a dual general and Judaic studies curriculum.\n

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Symphony Space (Q7661643)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Symphony Space, founded by Isaiah Sheffer and Allan Miller, is a multi-disciplinary performing arts organization at 2537 Broadway on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Performances take place in the 760-seat Peter Jay Sharp Theatre (also called Peter Norton Symphony Space) or the 160-seat Leonard Nimoy Thalia. Programs include music, dance, theater, film, and literary readings. In addition, Symphony Space provides literacy programs and the Curriculum Arts Project, which integrates performing arts into social studies curricula in New York City Public Schools.\n

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equestrian statue of Joan of Arc (Q20798631)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Joan of Arc, also known as Joan of Arc, Maiden of Orleans was used as a model to create this statue by Anna Hyatt Huntington at Riverside Drive and Ninety-third Street.\n

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Manhattan Avenue (Q6749229)
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Manhattan Avenue may refer to:

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Café des Artistes (Q5017283)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Café des Artistes was a fine restaurant at One West 67th Street in Manhattan and was owned by George Lang. He closed the restaurant for vacation at the beginning of August 2009 and, while away, then 85-year-old Lang decided to keep it closed permanently. He announced the closure on August 28, 2009. His wife, Jenifer Lang, had been the managing director of the restaurant since 1990.

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Charles M. Schwab House (Q5080502)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Charles M. Schwab House (also called Riverside) was an extravagant, 75 room mansion located on Riverside Drive between West 73rd and West 74th Streets, on the Upper West Side in New York City. It was constructed for steel magnate Charles M. Schwab and was the grandest and most ambitious house ever built on the island of Manhattan. The home was considered by many to be the classic example of a "white elephant", as it was built on the "wrong" side of Central Park away from the more fashionable Upper East Side.

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161 West 93rd Street (Q4551243)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

161 West 93rd Street is a building on 93rd Street in Manhattan that was once the home of the Nippon Club, a gentlemen's club for Japanese Americans and Japanese nationals.

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Triad Theater (Q7839895)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Triad Theatre, formerly known as Palsson's Supper Club, Steve McGraw's, and Stage 72, is a cabaret-style performing arts venue located on West 72nd Street on New York's Upper West Side. The theatre has been the original home to some of the longest running Off-Broadway shows including Forever Plaid, Forbidden Broadway, Spamilton, and Secrets Every Smart Traveler Should Know.\n

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Special Music School (Q14707317)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Special Music School (SMS, PS 859) is a K-12 public school that teaches music as a core subject on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The school is run as a public/private partnership between the New York City Department of Education and Kaufman Music Center, a not-for-profit, multi-arts organization. The Department of Education funds the academic portion of the students' education, while the music program is funded by private donations through Kaufman Music Center.

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New York Coliseum (Q7013358)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Coliseum was a convention center that stood at Columbus Circle in Manhattan, New York City, from 1956 to 2000. It was designed by architects Leon and Lionel Levy in a modified International Style, and included both a low building with exhibition space and a 26-story office block. The project also included the construction of a housing development directly behind the complex.\n

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St. Matthew's Church (Q7590595)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Matthew is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 215 West 67th Street in Manhattan, New York City. The parish was canonically established in 1902 and suppressed in 1959.\n

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Manhattan Day School (Q14706887)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Day School, often referred to as MDS, is a co-educational Modern Orthodox Jewish yeshiva elementary school located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was founded in 1943 as Yeshivat Ohr Torah Community School. MDS is dedicated to the academic, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and social development of each child. Manhattan Day School consists of an Early Childhood (Two year olds - Kindergarten), Lower School (1st - 5th grade) and Middle School (6th - 8th grade). The school is led by Ms. Raizi Chechik.\n

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Manhattantown (Q3285828)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Manhattantown, now known as Park West Village or West Park Apartments, was a massive urban renewal project in Manhattan Valley, formerly Bloomingdale District, in New York City west of Central Park. It was funded by Title I of the Housing Act of 1949, which financed slum clearance under urban redevelopment initiatives. Allegations of corruption were leveled soon after the project's inception in the spring of 1949, culminating in hearings in the Senate's Banking and Currency Committee in 1954.\n

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Fordham Graduate School of Social Service (Q5468061)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service (GSS) is a United States graduate school within Fordham University, in New York City. Established in 1916, it provides instruction at three campuses in the New York City area and also offers an MSW Hybrid at Molloy College in Long Island and a fully Online MSW nationally. The school was ranked 11th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2018.

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Manhattan Neighborhood Network (Q6749293)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) is an American non-profit organization that broadcasts programming on five public-access television cable TV stations in Manhattan, New York City. The country’s largest community media center, MNN operates two community media centers – in midtown Manhattan and East Harlem – and provides education, equipment, facilities, and programs to community producers and organizations who want to create programming to air on one of MNN's five channels. In 2016, MNN will post more than 5,000 enrollments in their media classes, making one of the largest media education institutions in New York City.\n

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Drisha Institute (Q5307804)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Drisha Institute for Jewish Education is a center for advanced Jewish learning located on the Upper West Side of New York City. Though initially founded to promote advanced scholarship for women, it has since expanded to offer an array of text-based learning opportunities for men and women of all ages. Its stated mission is to provide students with the opportunity to encounter texts in an intellectually rigorous and inclusive manner.\n

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Mannes College The New School for Music (Q1519151)
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Mannes School of Music is a music conservatory in The New School, a private research university in New York City. In the fall of 2015, Mannes moved from its previous location on Manhattan's Upper West Side to join the rest of the New School campus in Arnhold Hall at 55 W. 13th Street.

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Studio Maestro (Q3500998)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Studio Maestro is a ballet school in New York City founded in 1995 by Rose Caiola. A portion of its students have graduated into ballet companies including American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, Washington Ballet, National Ballet of Croatia, Pennsylvania Ballet, National Ballet of Canada, San Francisco Ballet, Ballet de Espana.\n

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Hurrah (Q5947026)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hurrah was a nightclub located at 36 West 62nd Street in New York City from 1976 until 1980. Hurrah was the first large dance club in NYC to feature punk, new wave and industrial music. The in-house DJ\'s at Hurrah were Sara Salir, Bill Bahlman and Anita Sarko. Under the management of Henry Schissler, and later Jim Fouratt, it became known as the first "rock disco" in New York, and pioneered the use of music videos in nightclubs, placing video monitors around the club, over a year before the launch of MTV. The club was owned by Arthur Weinstein (who also created The World and the afterhours clubs The Jefferson and The Continental) and his partners, who opened the club in November 1976, months before Studio 54.

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Harkness Theatre (Q18348374)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Colonial Theatre in New York City was at Broadway and 62nd Street in what was then the San Juan Hill neighborhood on the Upper West Side, Manhattan. Originally named the Colonial Music Hall, it was opened in 1905 by Frederic Thompson and Elmer "Skip" Dundy. Designed by George Keister, the theater had a seating capacity of 1,293.

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The Brentmore (Q15032061)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Brentmore at 88 Central Park West, on the Upper West Side of New York City, is an apartment building that faces the west side of Central Park. It is on the southwest corner of 69th Street.

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American Council on Science and Health (Q4743553)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) is a pro-industry science advocacy organization founded in 1978 by Elizabeth Whelan. \n

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Hotel Paris (Q23035375)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hotel Paris is a historic residential building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, USA.\n

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