Manhattan

Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America
category: place — type: county — OSM: relation 8186559

Items with no match found in OSM

2,208 items

Fifth Avenue-59th Street (Q2159540)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Fifth Avenue–59th Street is a station on the BMT Broadway Line of the New York City Subway. Located under Grand Army Plaza near the intersection of 5th Avenue and 60th Street in Manhattan, it is served by the N train at all times, the W train on weekdays, and the R train at all times except late nights.\n

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Times Square Studios (Q902959)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Times Square Studios (TSS) is an American television studio owned by The Walt Disney Company, located on the southeastern corner of West 44th Street and Broadway in the Times Square area of the borough of Manhattan. The studio is best known as the production home of ABC News' Good Morning America (GMA), a morning news and talk program, segments for other ABC News programs, and various programs on ESPN.\n

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West Side Highway (Q130424)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Side Highway (officially the Joe DiMaggio Highway) is a 5.42-mile-long (8.72\xa0km) mostly surface section of New York State Route\xa09A (NY\xa09A) that runs from West 72nd Street along the Hudson River to the southern tip of Manhattan in New York City. It replaced the West Side Elevated Highway, built between 1929 and 1951, which was shut down in 1973 due to neglect and lack of maintenance, and was dismantled by 1989. The term "West Side Highway" is often mistakenly used to include the roadway north of 72nd Street, which is properly known as the Henry Hudson Parkway.

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Aeolian Hall (Q380974)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Aeolian Hall was a concert hall in midtown Manhattan in New York City, located on the third floor of 29-33 West 42nd Street (also 34 West 43rd Street, from the other side) across the street from Bryant Park. The Aeolian Building was built in 1912 for the Aeolian Company, which manufactured pianos. Located on the site of the former Latting Tower, which during the 19th century was a popular observatory, the 18-story building contained the 1,100-seat Aeolian Hall. The building stands next to the Grace Building.\n

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American Folk Art Museum (Q464354)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Folk Art Museum is an art museum in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, at 2, Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue at 66th Street. It is the premier institution devoted to the aesthetic appreciation of folk art and creative expressions of contemporary self-taught artists from the United States and abroad.\n

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City Investing Building (Q1093955)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The City Investing Building was an early skyscraper in Manhattan, New York City erected in 1908 as one of the largest buildings of its era. Located on Broadway in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, it was razed in 1968.\n

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No Reservations (Q761548)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

No Reservations is a 2007 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Scott Hicks. Starring Catherine Zeta-Jones, Aaron Eckhart, and Abigail Breslin, the screenplay by Carol Fuchs is an adaptation of an original script by Sandra Nettelbeck, which served as the basis for the 2001 German film Mostly Martha, and revolves around a hard-edged chef whose life is turned upside down when she decides to take in her young niece following a tragic accident that killed her sister. Patricia Clarkson, Bob Balaban, and Jenny Wade co-star, with Brían F. O'Byrne, Lily Rabe, and Zoë Kravitz—appearing in her first feature film—playing supporting roles.\n

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Broad Exchange Building (Q921911)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Broad Exchange Building is a historical building located at 25 Broad Street, in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. When built in 1900 it was the largest office building in Manhattan.

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Central Park West Historic District (Q525239)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Central Park West Historic District is located in Manhattan, New York City, United States along historic Central Park West, between 61st and 97th Streets. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 9, 1982. The district encompasses a portion of the Upper West Side-Central Park West Historic District as designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and contains a number of prominent New York City landmarks, including The Dakota Apartments, a National Historic Landmark. The buildings date from the late 19th century to the early 1940s and exhibit a variety of architectural styles. The majority of the district's buildings are of neo-Italian Renaissance style, but Art Deco is a popular theme as well.\n

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El Faro Restaurant (Q559749)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

El Faro Restaurant was a small Spanish food emporium located at 823 Greenwich Street in the West Village of Manhattan, New York City. El Faro opened in 1927 and shuttered in 2012 after failing to raise over $80,000 to pay off fines and expenses.

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Christopher Street (Q1086990)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Christopher Street is a street in the West Village neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is the continuation of 9th Street west of Sixth Avenue.\n

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Luhring Augustine Gallery (Q509930)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Luhring Augustine Gallery is an art gallery in Chelsea in New York City. Its principal focus is the representation of an international group of contemporary artists whose diverse practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, video and photography.\n

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Nolita (Q568572)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Nolita, sometimes written as NoLIta, and deriving from "North of Little Italy" is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Nolita is situated in Lower Manhattan, bounded on the north by Houston Street, on the east by the Bowery, on the south roughly by Broome Street, and on the west by Lafayette Street. It lies east of SoHo, south of NoHo, west of the Lower East Side, and north of Little Italy and Chinatown.

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Broome Street (Q917139)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Broome Street is an east–west street in Lower Manhattan. It runs nearly the full width of Manhattan island, from Hudson Street in the west to Lewis Street in the east, near the entrance to the Williamsburg Bridge. The street is interrupted in a number of places by parks, buildings, and Allen Street's median. The street was named after Staten Island-born John Broome, who was a Colonial merchant and politician and became a Lieutenant Governor of New York State.\n

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National Track and Field Hall of Fame (Q1087567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Track and Field Hall of Fame is a museum operated by The Armory Foundation in conjunction with USA Track & Field. It is located within the Armory Foundation (the former Fort Washington Avenue Armory) at 216 Fort Washington Avenue, between 168th and 169th Streets, in Washington Heights, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The stated goal of the Hall is to reflect upon, appreciate, and honor the past by saluting Americans who have made important contributions to the history of Track and Field. Inductees to the Hall of Fame include athletes, coaches, contributors, officials, event directors, journalists and administrators. The USA Track & Field has been inducting members into the Hall since 1974. Currently there are 249 people enshrined.

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South Village (Q781923)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The South Village is a largely residential area that is part of the larger Greenwich Village in lower Manhattan, New York City, directly below Washington Square Park. Known for its immigrant heritage and bohemian history, the architecture of the South Village is primarily tenement-style apartment buildings, indicative of the area's history as an enclave for Italian American immigrants and working-class residents of New York.\n

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Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations (Q1142248)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations was a World's Fair held in 1853 in what is now Bryant Park in New York City, in the wake of the highly successful 1851 Great Exhibition in London. It aimed to showcase the new industrial achievements of the world and also to demonstrate the nationalistic pride of a relatively young nation and all that she stood for. Jacob Aaron Westervelt, at that time Mayor of New York, was the President of the exhibition-committee. The general superintendent was Admiral Du Pont.\n

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Little Spain (Q1141753)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Little Spain (Spanish: Pequeña España) was a Spanish-American neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan during the 20th century.

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Bank Street (Q4855978)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bank Street is a primarily residential street in the West Village part of Greenwich Village in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It runs for a total length of about 710 feet (220\xa0m) from West Street, crossing Washington Street and Greenwich Street, to Hudson Street and Bleecker Street where it is interrupted by the Bleecker Playground, north of which is Abingdon Square; it then continues to Greenwich Avenue, crossing West 4th Street and Waverly Place. Vehicular traffic runs west-east along this one-way street. As with several other east-west streets in the Far West Village, the three blocks west of Hudson Street are paved with setts.\n

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Bellwether Gallery (Q4884230)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Bellwether Gallery was a New York City art gallery based in Chelsea. Director and owner Becky Smith was recognized as an important promoter of emerging artists since the gallery's 1999 opening in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn. The gallery moved to Chelsea in 2005 and closed in 2009.\n

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Bitforms gallery (Q4918850)
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bitforms gallery is a gallery in New York City devoted to new media art practices.

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Blue School (Q4929822)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Blue School is a progressive independent school located in New York City's Lower Manhattan.\n

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BlainDi Donna (Q4923911)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Di Donna Galleries is an American art gallery in New York City. It specializes in Modern and Surrealist art.

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Bluebelt (Q4930218)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bluebelt is a large scale system of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) in New York City. The program originated on Staten Island in the early 1990s, but has also been implemented in Queens and the Bronx. The Bluebelt includes structural and nonstructural stormwater management control measures taken to mitigate changes to both quantity and quality of runoff caused through changes to land use.\n

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Battery Place (Q4869875)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Battery Place was a station on the demolished Ninth Avenue and Sixth Avenue elevated train lines in New York City. It was located at the southern terminus of Greenwich Street at the north end of Battery Park.\n

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Bishop Dubois High School (Q4917540)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bishop Dubois High School was a private Catholic high school in New York City from 1946 until 1976.\n

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Bogardus Place (Q4937372)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bogardus Place is located in the Inwood section of New York City borough of Manhattan. The one-block street was opened in 1912, and runs 642 feet (196\xa0m) between Hillside Avenue and Ellwood Street, and is named for the family who previously owned much of the land that forms both Fort Tryon Park, and the Fort Tryon section.\n

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New York International Auto Show (Q964426)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York International Auto Show is an annual auto show that is held in Manhattan in late March or early April. It is held at the Jacob Javits Convention Center. It usually opens on or just before Easter weekend and closes on the first Sunday after Easter. In 2018, the NYIAS took place from March 30 through April 8.\n

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Worth Street (Q1318800)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Worth Street is a two-way street running roughly northwest-southeast in Manhattan, New York City. It runs from Hudson Street, TriBeCa, in the west to Chatham Square in Chinatown in the east. Past Chatham Square, the roadway continues as Oliver Street, a north-south street running one-way northbound. Between West Broadway and Church Street, Worth Street is also known as Justice John M. Harlan Way in honor of the Supreme Court justice and alumnus of the nearby New York Law School. Between Centre and Baxter Streets, Worth Street is also known as the "Avenue of the Strongest", "New York\'s Strongest" being a nickname for the city\'s Department of Sanitation.

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Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration (Q4832917)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration is a graduate school part of Yeshiva University which specializes in Jewish education and was established in 1945 and named in 1983 for Montréal architect and philanthropist David J. Azrieli. Classes are held at Yeshiva University's Wilf Campus in Manhattan's Washington Heights neighborhood, and Israel Henry Beren Campus in Manhattan's Murray Hill neighborhood.\n

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Bampton Lectures (Q4853533)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bampton Lectures at Columbia University are a recurring series of lectures that were established by a bequest of Ada Byron Bampton Tremaine.

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Bayard Rustin Educational Complex (Q4874340)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bayard Rustin Educational Complex – also known as the Humanities Educational Complex – at West 18th Street between Eighth and Ninth Avenues in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, is a "vertical campus" of the New York City Department of Education which contains a number of small public schools, most of them high schools — grades 9 through 12 – along with one combined middle and high school – grades 6 through 12.\n

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Bayview Correctional Facility (Q4875002)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Bayview Correctional Facility was a medium-security women's prison located at the south corner of West 20th Street and 11th Avenue in Manhattan, directly across the avenue from the Chelsea Piers sports complex. It is highly unusual to find a state penitentiary in the middle of a major city.

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Beekman Place (Q4879833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Beekman Place is a small street located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Running from north to south for two blocks, the street is situated between the eastern end of 51st Street and Mitchell Place, where it ends at a retaining wall above 49th Street, overlooking the glass apartment towers at 860 and 870 United Nations Plaza, just north of the headquarters of the United Nations. "Beekman Place" also refers to the residential neighborhood that surrounds the street itself. It is named after the Beekman family, who were influential in New York City\'s development.

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Bijou Theatre (Q4907254)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Two Broadway theatres have been named the Bijou Theatre.\n

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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (Q967276)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law. The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr. following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden. The Commission is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them once they're designated. It is the largest municipal preservation agency in the nation.

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Pave the Way Foundation (Q964485)
{'lang': , 'extract': '


Pave the Way Foundation (PTWF) is a non-sectarian organization whose mission is to identify and eliminate non-theological obstacles between religions, headed by Gary Krupp. The organization is dedicated to achieving peace by closing the gaps in tolerance, education, and the practical relations between religions through cultural, technological and intellectual exchanges. PTWF strives to eliminate the use of religion as a tool to achieve personal agendas and to cause conflicts.\n

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Croton Aqueduct (Q1141610)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Croton Aqueduct or Old Croton Aqueduct was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City between 1837 and 1842. The great aqueducts, which were among the first in the United States, carried water by gravity 41 miles (66\xa0km) from the Croton River in Westchester County to reservoirs in Manhattan. It was built because local water resources had become polluted and inadequate for the growing population of the city. Although the aqueduct was largely superseded by the New Croton Aqueduct, which was built in 1890, the Old Croton Aqueduct remained in service until 1955.

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One Penn Plaza (Q1138648)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

One Penn Plaza (1 Penn Plaza) is a skyscraper in New York City, located between 33rd Street and 34th Street, west of Seventh Avenue, and adjacent to Pennsylvania Station and Madison Square Garden. It is the tallest building in the Pennsylvania Plaza complex of office buildings, hotels, and entertainment facilities.\n

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Barrow Street Theatre (Q4863904)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Barrow Street Theatre was an Off Broadway theatre venue located in New York City's historic Greenwich House\n

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Bodley Gallery (Q4936656)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bodley Gallery was a prominent art gallery in New York City, United States, from the late 1940s through the early 1980s. The Bodley specialized in contemporary and modern art. David Mann was director of the gallery during its heyday and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Braun (a.k.a. Georgie Duffee), were the owners.\n

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P.S. 135 (Q964759)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

P.S. 135 (Public School 135), also known as P.S. 35 (Public School 35), is a historic school building located at 931 First Avenue at East 51st Street in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1892 on the site of "Mouth Pleasant", the estate of James Beekman. The school was designed by George W. Debevoise in the Romanesque revival style., and has been at various times a community center, a homeless shelter and a nursery school, as well as the United Nations International School. There was an addition made to the building in 1904.\n

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Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development (Q966540)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development (commonly referred to as Steinhardt) is the secondary liberal arts and education school of New York University. It is one of the only schools in the world of its type. \n

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Auburn Theological Seminary (Q4819308)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Auburn Theological Seminary, located in New York City, teaches students about progressive social issues by offering workshops, providing consulting, and conducting research on faith leadership development.\n

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Baruch College Campus High School (Q4865849)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Baruch College Campus High School (BCCHS) is a public high school located in Kips Bay in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Baruch College Campus High School received the highest number of applications among all of the New York City public high schools in 2011. BCCHS is renowned for its high academic standards, advisory program and perfect graduation rate. In 2012, BCCHS ranked 489 in the U.S. News & World Report list of best "gold-medal" U.S. high schools.\n

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Battery Park Underpass (Q4869874)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Battery Park Underpass is a vehicular tunnel at the southernmost tip of Manhattan, New York City, near the neighborhoods of South Ferry and Battery Park City. The tunnel connects FDR Drive, which runs along the east side of Manhattan Island, with the West Side Highway (New York State Route 9A, or NY\xa09A), which runs along the island's west side. Opened in 1951, it was the second section of the FDR Drive to be completed. The underpass crosses beneath the Battery (formerly Battery Park) and the approach to the Brooklyn–Battery Tunnel.\n

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Bethany Baptist Church (Q4897717)
{'lang': , 'extract': '


Bethany Baptist Church is a Baptist church located at 542-546 West 153rd Street in Manhattan, New York City. The church building was originally built for as the Washington Heights Evangelical Lutheran Church, built 1921 to designs by architect Francik Averkamp of 600 West 181st Street. A minor brick and stone fence was built in 1911 to designs by Upjohn & Conable, indicating an earlier building.

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Hotel Attraction (Q4891660)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hotel Attraction was a proposed project by architect Antoni Gaudí, for a skyscraper in New York City.\n

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Colony Club (Q964460)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Colony Club is a women-only private social club in New York City. Founded in 1903 by Florence Jaffray Harriman, wife of J. Borden Harriman, as the first social club established in New York City by and for women, it was modeled on similar clubs for men. Today, men are admitted as guests.

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One Times Square (Q1139633)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

One Times Square, also known as 1475 Broadway, the New York Times Building, the New York Times Tower, or simply as the Times Tower, is a 25-story, 363-foot-high (111\xa0m) skyscraper, designed by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz, located at 42nd Street and Broadway in New York City.\n

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Six World Trade Center (Q1278748)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Six World Trade Center was an eight-story building in Lower Manhattan in New York City. It opened in 1974 and was the building in the World Trade Center complex that had the fewest stories. The building served as the U.S. Customs House for New York. It was destroyed in 2001 due to the collapse of the North Tower during the September 11 attacks; it is not set to be replaced as part of the new World Trade Center.\n

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WABC (Q1322074)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WABC (770 AM) – branded on-air as Talkradio\xa077\xa0WABC – is a commercial talk radio station licensed to serve New York City. Owned by John Catsimatidis' Red Apple Media, the station currently serves as the flagship station for syndicated hosts Mark Levin and John Batchelor; it is the radio home for Bernard McGuirk, Sid Rosenberg, Curtis Sliwa and Juliet Huddy; and is the New York City affiliate for Westwood One News, Brian Kilmeade, The Ben Shapiro Show and Red Eye Radio. The station shares studio facilities with former sister station WNBM above Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan, and its transmitter is located in Lodi, New Jersey. Its 50,000 watt non-directional clear channel signal can be heard at night throughout much of the eastern United States and Canada, and it is the primary entry point for the Emergency Alert System in the New York metropolitan area. \n

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Barclay Street (Q4859954)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Barclay Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It opened on February 14, 1870 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was Cortlandt Street. The next northbound stop was Warren Street.\n

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Beltone Studios (Q4884786)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Beltone Studios was a recording studio at 1650 Broadway, Manhattan, New York City. Miles Davis\'s album Miles Davis and Horns was partly recorded here in 1953, and The Crows 1954 hit "Gee" was also recorded here, the same year. In 1960 it established Beltone Records.

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Bloomingdale Insane Asylum (Q4928315)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bloomingdale Insane Asylum (1821–1889) was a private hospital for the care of the mentally ill that was founded by New York Hospital. It occupied the land in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan where Columbia University is now located. It relocated to White Plains as the "Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic," now known as the "NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester Behavioral Health Center."

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Park Row (Q1386890)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Park Row is a street located in the Financial District, Civic Center, and Chinatown neighborhoods of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street runs east-west, sometimes called north-south because the western end is nearer to the Financial District. At the north end of Park Row is the confluence of Bowery, East Broadway, St. James Place, Oliver Street, Mott Street, and Worth Street at Chatham Square. At the street's south end, Broadway, Vesey Street, Barclay Street, and Ann Street intersect. The intersection includes a bus turnaround loop designated as Millennium Park. Park Row was once known as Chatham Street; it was renamed Park Row in 1886, a reference to the fact that it faces City Hall Park, the former New York Common.\n

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Bond Street Theatre (Q4941303)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Bond Street Theatre initiates creative programming that inspires and educates youth, addresses human rights issues, heals communities affected by conflict, and promotes the value of the arts in shaping a peaceful future. The country's actor-educators work internationally in refugee camps, post-conflict zones, crisis areas, and with populations that have been victims of natural disaster, using theatre to promote healing, empowerment, and social development. Founded in 1976 in New York City, Bond Street Theatre [1] is an NGO in association with the United Nations Department of Public Information.\n

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Boxee (Q4951660)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Boxee was a cross-platform freeware HTPC (Home Theater PC) software application with a 10-foot user interface and social networking features designed for the living-room TV that enables its users to view, rate and recommend content to their friends through many social network services and interactive media related features. Boxee was originally a fork of the free and open source XBMC (now Kodi) media center software which Boxee used as an application framework for its GUI and media player core platform, together with some custom and proprietary additions.

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Bretton Hall, Manhattan (Q4962477)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bretton Hall is a twelve-story residential building at 2350 Broadway, spanning from West 85th to 86th streets on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

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Broadway Dance Center (Q4972435)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broadway Dance Center is a dance school located at West 45th Street west of Times Square in New York City. It was founded in 1984 as one of the first "drop-in" dance training schools in the world, offering classes in jazz, tap, ballet, contemporary, hip hop and theater. \n

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Broadway United Church of Christ (Q4972534)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broadway United Church of Christ is a Congregationalist Church located on West 86th Street, between Broadway and West End Avenue on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.\n

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Interfaith Center of New York (Q6046324)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Interfaith Center of New York (ICNY) is a secular educational non-profit organization founded in 1997 by the Very Reverend James Parks Morton. ICNY programs work to connect religious leaders and their communities with civil organizations and each other.\n

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International Print Center New York (Q6052565)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

International Print Center New York is a non-profit organization dedicated to the appreciation and understanding of fine art prints. It was founded by Anne Coffin and established in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York City in September 2000 as the only non-profit institution devoted solely to the exhibition and understanding of fine art prints. IPCNY fosters a climate for the enjoyment, examination and serious study of artists' prints from the old master to the contemporary. IPCNY nurtures the growth of new audiences for the visual arts while serving the print community through exhibitions, publications, and educational programs.\n

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Irish Repertory Theatre (Q6071145)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\n\n

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Isaac T. Hopper House (Q6077192)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Isaac T. Hopper House is a Greek Revival townhouse at 110 Second Avenue between East 6th and 7th Streets in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Located just south of the New Middle Collegiate Church, it was built in 1837 and 1838 as a rowhouse. The building was also known as the Ralph and Ann E. Van Wyck Mead House, after its first owner. 110 Second Avenue is the only remaining rowhouse out of a group of four at 106–112 Second Avenue that was used by the Meads' extended family, and was originally known as 108 Second Avenue.\n

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291 (Q1392715)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

291 is the commonly known name for an internationally noted art gallery that was located in Midtown Manhattan at 291 Fifth Avenue in New York City from 1905 to 1917. Originally known as the "Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession", the gallery was created and managed by photographer Alfred Stieglitz.\n

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Bowery Amphitheatre (Q4950928)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bowery Amphitheatre was a building in the Bowery neighborhood of New York City. It was located at 37 and 39 Bowery, across the street from the Bowery Theatre. Under a number of different names and managers, the structure served as a circus, menagerie, theatre, a roller rink, and a branch of the Peniel Mission. The site is now part of Confucius Plaza.\n

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Bowery Savings Bank (Q4950939)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bowery Savings Bank was a bank in New York City. It was chartered in May 1834 and is now part of Capital One Bank.\n

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Bowery Theatre (Q4950940)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bowery Theatre was a playhouse on the Bowery in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Although it was founded by rich families to compete with the upscale Park Theatre, the Bowery saw its most successful period under the populist, pro-American management of Thomas Hamblin in the 1830s and 1840s. By the 1850s, the theatre came to cater to immigrant groups such as the Irish, Germans, and Chinese. It burned down four times in 17 years, a fire in 1929 destroying it for good. Although the theatre\'s name changed several times (Thalia Theatre, Fay\'s Bowery Theatre, etc.), it was generally referred to as the "Bowery Theatre".\n

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Bradford Hotel (Q4954698)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bradford Hotel is a New York City establishment which opened on October 18, 1924, at 206 - 22 West 70th Street in Manhattan. It cost $2 million to build and was designed by George F. Pelham. It was owned by the Lapidus Engineering Company, the same firm that controlled the Hotel Oxford, which opened in 1923.\nThe apartment hotel is sixteen stories and occupied a plot 150 by 100 between Broadway (Manhattan) and West End Avenue. It contains four hundred rooms., each with private bathrooms, kitchenettes, and many with terraces. It was being converted to a project for the elderly by January 1970.

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Brasserie Julien (Q4957927)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brasserie Julien was a brasserie-style French cuisine restaurant located at 1422 Third Avenue (between East 80th Street and East 81st Street) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, as well as a jazz club. The establishment closed at the end of 2012.\n

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BurritoVille (Q5000455)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

BurritoVille is a New York City-based quick-service food chain serving Tex-Mex cuisine, established in 1992. Until 2008, there were 16 locations in Manhattan, one in Westbury, New York on Long Island, and one in Hoboken, NJ. The menu items consist mostly of various types of burritos and tacos, as well as salads and nachos. Many of the items are vegetarian. \n

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Institute of Culinary Education (Q6040186)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) is a private for-profit culinary school in New York City. ICE is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), and offers career training diploma programs in Culinary Arts, Pastry & Baking Arts, Culinary Management and Hospitality Management. The school runs one of the largest program of hands-on recreational cooking classes and wine education courses in the country, with more than 26,000 enthusiasts taking any of the 1,500 classes offered each year.\n

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Ithaka Harbors (Q6094538)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ithaka Harbors, Inc. is a US not-for-profit organization whose stated mission is to "help the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways". It is the parent company of digital library website JSTOR, the digital preservation service Portico, and the research and consulting group Ithaka S+R. Ithaka was founded in 2003 by Kevin M. Guthrie. Ithaka\'s revenue was $86 million in 2014, most of it ($69 million) from JSTOR service fees.

'}
Booth's Theatre (Q4943860)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Booth's Theatre was a theatre in New York built by actor Edwin Booth. Located on the southeast corner of 23rd Street and Sixth Avenue, Booth's Theatre opened on February 3, 1869.\n

"}
Brasserie Les Halles (Q4957928)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brasserie Les Halles was a French-brasserie-style restaurant located on 15 John Street (between Broadway & Nassau Street; in the Financial District) in Manhattan, New York City. Previous locations were on Park Avenue South in Manhattan, in Tokyo, Miami, and Washington, D.C. Author and television host Anthony Bourdain was the predecessor to the executive chef of Brasserie Les Halles, Carlos Llaguno. The restaurant went bankrupt in August 2017.

'}
British International School of New York (Q4970154)
{'lang': , 'extract': '


\nThe British International School of New York (BIS-NY) was established in 2006 at Waterside Plaza, an upscale development on the East River in the Kips Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The student body is a mix of British expatriates, American nationals and students from a mix of other countries, and includes both boys and girls. The school serves students from age three up to upper school. Its facilities include a swimming pool, secured playground, gymnasium, and Smart Boards in every classroom. The school offers rolling admissions, so that children can enter the school throughout the year, as long as there is space available. This is particularly helpful for families who have been transferred internationally at short notice.\n

'}
Browning School (Q4976578)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Browning School is an independent school for boys in New York City. It was founded in 1888 by John A. Browning. It offers instruction in grades kindergarten through 12th grade. The school is a member of the New York Interschool consortium.\n

'}
Bruce Silverstein Gallery (Q4978279)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bruce Silverstein Gallery is a photographic art gallery in the Chelsea section of Manhattan, New York City. It was started in 2001 by Bruce Silverstein. The gallery is a member of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers.

'}
Bungalow 8 (Q4997607)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bungalow 8 is a nightclub chain created in 2001 that was located in Chelsea, Manhattan on 27th Street, between 10th and 11th Avenues.\n

'}
Bushman Steps (Q5001533)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • To a section: This is a redirect from a topic that does not have its own page to a section of a page on the subject.
  • \n
'}
Isaac Stern House (Q6077160)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Isaac Stern House was a mansion located on 858 Fifth Avenue in the Upper East Side in New York City. Ir was designed by Cady, Berg and See and constructed for the entrepreneur Isaac Stern.\n

'}
Bridge Cafe (Q4966208)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bridge Cafe was a historic restaurant and bar located at 279 Water Street in the South Street Seaport area of Manhattan, New York City, United States. The site was originally home to "a grocery and wine and porter bottler", opened in 1794, and has been home to a series of drinking and eating establishments. In the nineteenth century, the building was described in city directories variously as a grocery, a porterhouse, or a liquor establishment. Henry Williams operated a brothel there from 1847 to 1860 and the prostitutes were listed in the New York City census of 1855. In 1888, the building\'s exterior was altered to its present form. The building was damaged during Hurricane Sandy, and the restaurant remains closed as of 2020. Until its closure, it was the city\'s oldest continuous business establishment, though the name and ownership had changed numerous times. It had most recently been under the same ownership since 1979, when the former McCormick’s, a bar frequented by local fishmongers, was purchased by Jack Weprin and converted into The Bridge Cafe, a white tablecloth establishment.

'}
Bridge Street (Q4966296)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bridge Street is a street located in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and runs between State Street and Broad Street. It is split in two by Whitehall Street.\n

'}
Buck House NYC (Q4982876)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Buck House was a gallery on Madison Avenue in the Carnegie Hill neighborhood of Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The gallery opened in November 2001 and was owned and operated by artist Deborah Buck.

'}
Waverly Place (Q4993391)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Waverly Place is a narrow street, in the Greenwich Village section of the New York City borough of Manhattan, that runs from Bank Street to Broadway. Waverly changes direction roughly at its midpoint at Christopher Street, turning about 120 degrees from a north/south street to a northwest/southeast street. At Christopher Street, the traffic direction changes as well, from southbound to westbound. At the intersection where this transition occurs, Waverly branches into a Y, creating an intersection of Waverly Place with itself.\n

'}
International Culinary Center (Q6050037)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The International Culinary Center is a private, for-profit culinary school headquartered in Campbell, California. It was founded as The French Culinary Institute by Dorothy Cann Hamilton in 1984 and has campuses in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area. The facilities include professional kitchens for hands-on cooking and baking classes, specialized wine tasting classrooms, a library, theater, and event spaces.\n

'}
Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (Q7458190)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Essex Crossing is an under-construction mixed-use development in New York City's Lower East Side, part of the existing area known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA). The development, at the intersection of Delancey Street and Essex Street just north of Seward Park, will comprise nearly 2,000,000 square feet (200,000\xa0m2) of space on 6 acres (2\xa012\xa0ha). The development will cost an estimated US$1.1 billion. It will sit on a total of nine city blocks, most of them occupied by parking lots that replaced tenements razed in 1967.

"}
Scholastic Building (Q7432069)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Scholastic Building is the 10-story headquarters of the Scholastic Corporation, located on Broadway between Prince and Spring Streets in the SoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Built in 2001, it was the first new building to be constructed in the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District, replacing a one-story garage built in 1954. It is the only building in New York ever to be designed by Italian architect, Aldo Rossi. Originally conceived of in his New York office, it was completed and refined by disciple of his, Morris Adjmi. It is respectful of the neighboring buildings and pays homage to the district\'s cast iron architectural identity. The cast iron architecture that defines this neighborhood straddles between the classical and industrial periods of New York\'s past. According to historian William Higgins, "the building’s columnar Broadway façade, in steel, terra-cotta, and stone, echoes the scale and the formal, Classical character of its commercial neighbors. The rear façade, on Mercer Street, extracts a gritty essence from its more utilitarian surroundings of plain cast iron and weathered masonry."

'}
Septuagesimo Uno (Q7452367)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Septuagesimo Uno is a 0.04-acre (160\xa0m2) park in the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located on 71st Street between West End Avenue to the west and the intersection of Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue to the east. The park\'s name is Latin for "seventy-first". The park is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.\n

'}
Shutter House (Q7505658)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Shutter House, designed by architect Shigeru Ban, is a building in lower Chelsea, in New York City. The condominium building has 9 units and is an 11-story structure, including a ground floor gallery. The building incorporates a layered façade with a unique shutter system, reflecting the industrial past of the Chelsea and the Meatpacking District. The design, completed in May 2011, brings new life to New York residential architecture, and transforms the idea of traditional apartment living.\n

'}
Sinclair House (Q7522021)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sinclair House was a 19th-century hotel which stood at 754 Broadway and Eighth Street in Manhattan, New York City. It was demolished in 1908.

'}
Sister Elizabeth Maternity Hospital (Q7531110)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sister Elizabeth Memorial Hospital was a hospital in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. It was located at 362 51st Street, between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue and was absorbed by Lutheran Medical Center during the 1980s.

'}
Soho20 Chelsea (Q7554744)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

SOHO20 Artists, Inc., known as SOHO20 Gallery, was founded in 1973 by a group of women artists intent on achieving professional excellence in an industry where there was a gross lack of opportunities for women to succeed. SOHO20 was one of the first galleries in Manhattan to showcase the work of an all-woman membership and most of the members joined the organization as emerging artists. These artists were provided with exhibition opportunities that they could not find elsewhere.\n

'}
Citizens Budget Commission (Q5122675)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Citizens Budget Commission is a nonpartisan, nonprofit civic organization that attempts to influence change in the finances and services of New York City and New York State government.\n

'}
City Hall Post Office and Courthouse (Q5123209)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The City Hall Post Office and Courthouse was designed by architect Alfred B. Mullett for a triangular site in New York City along Broadway in Civic Center, lower Manhattan, across City Hall Park from New York City Hall. The Second Empire style building, erected between 1869 and 1880, was not well received. Commonly called "Mullett\'s Monstrosity", it was demolished in 1939 and the site used to extend City Hall Park to the south.

'}
Claremont Avenue (Q5126299)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Claremont Avenue is a short avenue in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It begins at 116th Street and runs north for a length of eleven blocks until it ends at Tiemann Place (the western segment of 127th Street). \n

'}
Columbia Secondary School (Q5149836)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Columbia Secondary School for Math, Science, & Engineering (otherwise known as CSS) is a selective public, sixth- through twelfth-grade school that opened in 2007. A partnership between the New York City Department of Education, the community, and Columbia University, CSS serves students who have an interest in a program focusing on STEM fields.

'}
Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (Q5149833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS or Columbia Engineering; previously known as Columbia School of Mines) is the engineering and applied science school of Columbia University. It was founded as the School of Mines in 1863 and then the School of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry before becoming the School of Engineering and Applied Science. On October 1, 1997, the school was renamed in honor of Chinese businessman Z.Y. Fu, who had donated $26 million to the school.\n

'}
Shuang Wen School (Q7504434)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

PS 184M Shuang Wen School (T: 雙文學校, S: 双文学校, Shuāng Wén Xuéxiào), a public school in New York City also known as PS 184, is a bilingual elementary and middle school located in Manhattan's Chinatown. The school teaches pre-kindergarten to 8th grade. It is a part of the New York City Department of Education. Admission is by lottery. As with all New York City public schools, priority is given to those who already have siblings in the school. While the school has consistently high test scores, it has been embroiled in scandals regarding fees, admissions and the integrity of parent reviews.\n

"}
Shubert Alley (Q7504539)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Shubert Alley is a narrow 300-foot (91\xa0m) long pedestrian alley at the heart of the Broadway theater district of New York City. It splits a block, as it runs parallel to and between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, linking West 44th Street to West 45th Street. It contains approximately 6,400 square feet (590\xa0m2) of public space.

'}
The Clebourne (Q5131022)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cleburne Building (also known as 924 West End Avenue) is an apartment building located at the northeast corner of West End Avenue and West 105th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Cloud Club (Q5135649)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cloud Club was a lunch club that occupied the 66th, 67th, and 68th floors of the Chrysler Building in New York City. At one time it was the highest lunch club in the world. It opened in 1930 and closed in 1979.\n

'}
Coenties Slip (Q5140796)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Coenties Slip, originally an artificial inlet in the East River for the loading and unloading of ships that was land-filled in 1835, is a historic street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, in the heart of the Financial District. It runs southeast from Pearl Street to South Street, a distance of two blocks (585.6 feet). The entire length of the road is a pedestrian street, though before 2013, the block north of Water Street carried vehicular traffic. \n

'}
Columbia University Department of Philosophy (Q5149894)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Columbia University Department of Philosophy is ranked 9th in the US and 10th in the English-speaking world, in the 2018 ranking of philosophy departments by The Philosophical Gourmet Report. It has particular strengths in logic, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophy of law, philosophy of biology, general philosophy of science, philosophy of social sciences, philosophy of physics, 17th-century early modern philosophy, and 19th- and 20th-century continental philosophy.\n

'}
Community Service Society of New York (Q5154875)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Community Service Society of New York (CSS) is an independent, nonprofit organization established in 1939. Originally formed as a charity providing direct assistance to the poor, its mission has evolved include research and advocacy as well as legal and informational support services for other organizations that work with low-income individuals. It is one of the seven organizations supported by The New York Times\' "Neediest Cases Fund".

'}
Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun (Q5160646)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun (KJ or CKJ) is a Modern Orthodox synagogue, located on East 85th Street on the Upper East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The synagogue was founded in 1872. The synagogue is closely affiliated with the Ramaz School. It shares a building with the lower school, and is across the street from the middle school.\n

'}
Sweet Basil Jazz Club (Q1719168)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Sweet Basil was a jazz club in New York City's Greenwich Village, located at 88 7th Avenue South. Founded in 1974 by Sharif Esmat, it was considered among the most prominent jazz clubs in New York. Many jazz albums were recorded live at Sweet Basil, including Cecil Taylor's Iwontunwonsi, McCoy Tyner's Live at Sweet Basil (1989) and Solar: Live at Sweet Basil, and the Jean-Michel Pilc Trio's Together: Live at Sweet Basil. From 1981 to 1992 the club was owned by Phyllis Litoff and her husband Mel Litoff.

"}
City Limits (Q5123273)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nFor the London magazine of the same name, see City Limits (magazine)\n

'}
Clef Club (Q5131072)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Clef Club was a popular entertainment venue and society for African-American musicians in Harlem, achieving its largest success in the 1910s. Incorporated by James Reese Europe in 1910, it was a combination musicians' hangout, fraternity club, labor exchange, and concert hall, across the street from Marshall's Hotel. In its best years, the Clef Club's annual take exceeded $100,000.\n

"}
Club 57 (Q5136099)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Club 57 was a nightclub located at 57 St. Mark's Place in the East Village, New York City during the late 1970s and early 1980s. It was founded by Stanley Zbigniew Strychacki. It was a hangout and venue for performance and visual artists and musicians, including The Cramps, Madonna, Keith Haring, Cyndi Lauper, Charles Busch, Klaus Nomi, The B-52s, RuPaul, Futura 2000, Kenny Scharf, Frank Holliday, Staceyjoy Elkin, John Sex, Wendy Wild, April Palmieri, The Fleshtones, The Fuzztones, Joey Arias, Lypsinka, Michael Musto, Marc Shaiman, Scott Wittman, Fab Five Freddy, Jacek Tylicki, and to a lesser extent, Jean-Michel Basquiat.\n

"}
College of Insurance (Q5146736)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The College of Insurance (TCI) was a specialized accredited college, started by insurance industry leaders in 1901 as an insurance library society, the Insurance Society of New York (ISNY). The Insurance Society of New York initially provided study space and material to young people entering the insurance industry, and served as a site for insurance lectures. Over the years, ISNY developed a curriculum based upon these lectures. The curriculum ultimately led to the creation of The School of Insurance, followed by The College of Insurance.\n

'}
Savoy Ballroom (Q1759057)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Savoy Ballroom was a large ballroom for music and public dancing located at 596 Lenox Avenue, between 140th and 141st Streets in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.\nLenox Avenue was the main thoroughfare through upper Harlem. Poet Langston Hughes calls it the Heartbeat of Harlem in Juke Box Love Song, and he set his work "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" on the legendary street. The Savoy was one of many Harlem hot spots along Lenox, but it was the one to be called the "World\'s Finest Ballroom". It was in operation from March 12, 1926, to July 10, 1958, and as Barbara Englebrecht writes in her article "Swinging at the Savoy", it was "a building, a geographic place, a ballroom, and the \'soul\' of a neighborhood".\nIt was opened and owned by white entrepreneur Jay Faggen and Jewish businessman Moe Gale. It was managed by African-American business man and civic leader Charles Buchanan. Buchanan, who was born in the British West Indies, sought to run a "luxury ballroom to accommodate the many thousands who wished to dance in an atmosphere of tasteful refinement, rather than in the small stuffy halls and the foul smelling, smoke laden cellar nightclubs\xa0..."

'}
Columbia Soccer Stadium (Q5149838)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Rocco B. Commisso Soccer Stadium is a 3,500 seat soccer-specific stadium located in Inwood, on the northernmost tip of the island of Manhattan, New York City, within the Baker Athletic Complex. The stadium is named in honor of Rocco B. Commisso, former co-captain of Columbia's 1970 varsity soccer team and current owner and Chairman of the New York Cosmos and ACF Fiorentina.

"}
City Gallery, New York (Q5123167)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

City Gallery was an art gallery in New York City that is now demolished.\n

'}
Coliseum Books (Q5145765)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Coliseum Books (1974-2007) was an independent bookstore that opened in 1974 on the northwest corner of 57th Street and Broadway, near Columbus Circle in the Manhattan borough of New York City. After initially closing its doors in 2002-after a series of financial difficulties and in part due to the increased real estate prices in that part of Manhattan-it relocated to its final location on 11 West 42nd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue, near Bryant Park.\n

'}
Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (Q5149701)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York City, also known simply as GSAPP, is regarded as one of the most important and prestigious architecture schools in the world. It is also home to the well-regarded Masters of Science program in Advanced Architectural Design, Historic Preservation, Real Estate Development, Urban Design, and Urban Planning.\n

'}
Columbia University Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (Q5149895)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Columbia University Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (also known as "MESAAS") is a leading center for the study of the politics, history, culture, societies and languages of the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa. With more than forty faculty members, core and adjunct, MESAAS houses a large number of world-renowned scholars, some of whom have had important contributions as public intellectuals in addition to their scholarly productions.

'}
Congregation Beit Simchat Torah (Q5160596)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Congregation Beit Simchat Torah ("CBST") is a synagogue located in Manhattan, New York City. It was founded in 1973, and is the world\'s largest LGBT synagogue. CBST serves Jews of all sexual orientations and gender identities, their families, and their friends. Members commute from as far away as the Bronx and New Jersey. The congregation is led by Senior Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum and Assistant Rabbi Yael Rapport. It is not affiliated with any denomination or branch of Judaism.\n

'}
Congregation Or Zarua (Q5160662)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Congregation Or Zarua is a Conservative synagogue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Founded in 1989 by under two dozen congregants and Rabbi Harlan J. Wechsler, it completed construction of its current building in 2002. Led by rabbi Scott N. Bolton, its membership is approximately 325 families. \n

'}
Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership (Q5145267)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at the City College of New York (CCNY) is a nonpartisan educational, training, and research center named for its founder, General Colin L. Powell, USA (Retired), a graduate of CCNY. The goals of the Powell School are to build leaders for the common good, promote civic engagement, and strengthen connections between the campus and neighboring communities.\n

'}
Greenwich Street (Q1338773)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Greenwich Street is a north-south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It extends from the intersection of Ninth Avenue and Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District at its northernmost end to its southern end at Battery Park.\n

'}
Hoffman Auto Showroom (Q5876587)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hoffman Auto Showroom was an automobile dealership at 430 Park Avenue, New York City. Designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for notable European importer Max Hoffman in 1954, the glass and steel 3,600-square-foot (330\xa0m2) space was located on the ground floor of an office tower located between East 55th and 56th Streets. It was dominated by a sloping floor capable of displaying up to five automobiles. \n

'}
Holmes Towers (Q5883624)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The John Haynes Holmes Towers is a public housing project for low income residents of the Yorkville section of the Upper East Side located just south of the neighborhood's northern limit at 96th Street, in New York City, New York, United States. The neighboring Isaacs Houses and the Holmes Towers border East Harlem, which has the highest concentration of public housing in the United States. The two public housing buildings, designed by Architects Eggers and Higgins, were completed in 1969, are 25 stories tall and contain 537 apartments. The project is located between 92nd and 93rd Streets from 1st Avenue to York Avenue and the FDR Drive.

"}
Hotel Claridge (Q5911374)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hotel Claridge was a 16-story building on Times Square in Manhattan, New York City, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 44th Street. Originally known as the Hotel Rector, it was built of brick in the Beaux-arts style in 1910–11. The 14-story building had 240 guest rooms and 216,000 square feet of space. It operated for 61 years until the building was demolished in 1972.\n

'}
Hotel Elysee (Q5911454)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hotel Elysée is a New York City hotel situated on 60 East 54th Street between Madison and Park Avenues. The hotel was founded in 1926 as a European-style hotel for the carriage trade by Swiss-born Max Haering.\n

'}
Confucius Plaza (Q5160304)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Confucius Plaza Apartments is a limited-equity housing cooperative in Chinatown, Manhattan, New York City. The 44-story brown brick tower block complex (433\xa0ft (132\xa0m)) with 762 apartments was constructed in 1975 at a cost of $38.387 million. The building was the first major public-funded housing project built for almost exclusively Chinese Americans.\n

'}
IBM New York Scientific Center (Q5968903)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

IBM New York Scientific Center was a research facility in downtown Manhattan located at 410 East 62nd Street. It was a source of computer science research for several decades, and had considerable published output.

'}
Hotel Astor (Q5903297)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hotel Astor was a hotel located in the Times Square area of Manhattan, New York City, in operation from 1904 through 1967. The former site of the hotel, the block bounded by Broadway, Astor Plaza, West 44th Street, and West 45th Street, is now occupied by the high-rise 54-story office tower One Astor Plaza.\n

'}
Hotel Kenmore Hall (Q5911641)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hotel Kenmore Hall is a 22-story single room occupancy hotel located at 145 East 23rd Street in the Gramercy section of Manhattan, designed by architect Maurice Deutsch and constructed in 1927. Author Nathanael West lived and worked at the hotel as a night manager in the early years after the hotel opened; one of West's real-life experiences at the hotel inspired the incident between Romola Martin and Homer Simpson that would later appear in The Day of the Locust (1939). West allowed friends like Edmund Wilson, Erskine Caldwell, S. J. Perelman and Maxwell Bodenheim free room and meals. Dashiell Hammett finished The Maltese Falcon here.

"}
Humanities Preparatory Academy (Q5939562)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Humanities Preparatory Academy (also known as Humanities Prep) is a public high school located in the Chelsea section of Manhattan in New York City, with an enrollment of 209. The school is noted for its diversity. Humanities Preparatory Academy sends over 99% of its students to 4 year prestigious universities and private schools. Founded as a program in Bayard Rustin High School, it became a school in 1997.\n

'}
Hunter College High School (Q5944289)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hunter College High School is a secondary school located in the Carnegie Hill neighborhood on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. It is administered by Hunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY). Hunter is publicly funded, and there is no tuition fee. Enrollment is approximately 1200 students. According to the school, "students accepted to Hunter represent the top one-quarter of 1% of students in New York City, based on test scores."

'}
Batteries Not Included (Q1170818)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Batteries Not Included (stylized as *batteries not included) is a 1987 American comic science fiction film directed by Matthew Robbins about small extraterrestrial living spaceships that save an apartment block under threat from property development. The story was originally intended to be featured in the television series Amazing Stories, but executive producer Steven Spielberg liked the idea so much that he decided to adapt it into a film. It was the feature film screenwriting debut of Brad Bird.\n

'}
Hoofers Club (Q5897693)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nThe Hoofers Club was an African-American entertainment establishment and dancers' club hangout in Harlem, New York, that ran from the early 1920s until the early 1940s. It was founded and managed by Lonnie Hicks (1882–1953), an Atlanta-born ragtime pianist.

"}
Houses at 1026-1028 Fifth Ave. (Q5915934)
{'lang': , 'extract': "
  • From a merge: This is a redirect from a page that was merged into another page. This redirect was kept in order to preserve this page's edit history after its content was merged into the target page's content. Please do not remove the tag that generates this text (unless the need to recreate content on this page has been demonstrated) nor delete this page.\n
    • For redirects with substantive page histories that did not result from page merges use {{R with history}} instead.
    • \n
  • \n
"}
Nuyorican Poets Café (Q1142721)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe is a nonprofit organization in Alphabet City in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. It is a bastion of the Nuyorican art movement in New York City, and has become a forum for poetry, music, hip hop, video, visual arts, comedy and theatre. Several events during the PEN World Voices festival are hosted at the cafe.

'}
Episcopal Diocese of New York (Q1347304)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Episcopal Diocese of New York is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, encompassing the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island in New York City, and the New York state counties of Westchester, Rockland, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Sullivan, and Ulster.\n

'}
Hudson River Park (Q1359049)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hudson River Park is a waterside park on the North River (Hudson River) that extends from 59th Street south to Battery Park in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The park, a component of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, stretches 4.5 miles (7.2\xa0km) and comprises 550 acres (220\xa0ha), making it the second-largest park in Manhattan after the 843-acre (341\xa0ha) Central Park.\n

'}
Eleventh Street Methodist Episcopal Church (Q5909006)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Eleventh Street Methodist Episcopal Chapel, also known as the People's Home Church and Settlement, Russian Ukrainian Polish Pentecostal Church, and Father's Heart Ministry Center, is a historic Methodist Episcopal chapel located in the East Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City. The chapel was built in 1868–1869, and is a raised two-story, three bay, gable front brick building. Originally constructed in a vernacular Gothic Revival style, it was altered between 1900 and 1901 in the Colonial Revival style. Associated with the chapel is the former rectory. It was built about 1856 as a four-story, three bay single family dwelling in a vernacular Greek Revival style. The rectory was converted to a settlement house in 1900–1901.

"}
Howard Gilman Foundation (Q5919753)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Howard Gilman Foundation is a charitable organization started by Howard Gilman.

'}
IRT Powerhouse (Q5973624)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The IRT Powerhouse (Interborough Rapid Transit Powerhouse) is a former power station of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. Built in 1904, the "thoroughly classical colossus of a building" fills the entire block between 58th to 59th Street, and from 11th to 12th Avenues in Riverside South, Manhattan. Since the building became unnecessary to the subway system in the 1950s, Consolidated Edison has used the space to supply the New York City steam system.

'}
Imagination Playground at Burling Slip (Q6002601)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Imagination Playground at Burling Slip is a playground on John Street near the South Street Seaport in New York City along South Street. The playground was designed by David Rockwell of Rockwell Group. It opened to the public on July 28, 2010.

'}
Holy Trinity Church, St. Christopher House and Parsonage (Q5886599)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Holy Trinity Church, St. Christopher House and Parsonage is a historic Episcopal church located at East 88th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York, New York. The building was built in 1897.

'}
Honeymoon Gang (Q5893863)
{'lang': , 'extract': '


'}
Hotel on Rivington (Q5912214)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hotel on Rivington is a 20-story luxury hotel on Rivington Street between Ludlow and Essex Street in Downtown Manhattan. The hotel was completed in 2005.

'}
Hurrah (Q5947026)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hurrah was a nightclub located at 36 West 62nd Street in New York City from 1976 until 1980. Hurrah was the first large dance club in NYC to feature punk, new wave and industrial music. Under the management of Henry Schissler, and later Jim Fouratt, it became known as the first "rock disco" in New York, and pioneered the use of music videos in nightclubs, placing video monitors around the club, over a year before the launch of MTV. The club was owned by Arthur Weinstein (who also created The World and the afterhours clubs The Jefferson and The Continental) and his partners, who opened the club in November 1976, months before Studio 54.

'}
Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre (Q993267)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre is a full-time professional conservatory for actors in New York City. First operational from 1915 to 1927, the school re-opened in 1928 and has been active ever since. It is the birthplace of the Meisner technique of acting, named for American actor and acting teacher Sanford Meisner.\n

'}
Electric Lady Studios (Q1325913)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Electric Lady Studios is a recording studio in Greenwich Village, New York City. It was built by Jimi Hendrix and designed by John Storyk in 1970. Hendrix spent only ten weeks recording in Electric Lady before his death, but it has since been used by many notable artists.\n

'}
Hole-in-the-Wall (Q5879924)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hole-in-the-Wall was a popular saloon and underworld hangout in what is now the South Street Seaport, Manhattan, New York City during the early- to mid-19th century. It has been described as the "most notorious" saloon in New York city during the 19th century. It was one of many dive bars and similar establishments in New York\'s infamous Fourth Ward, located at the corner of Water and Dover Streets. The saloon was owned by "One Armed" Charley Monell and featured notorious female criminals Kate Flannery and Gallus Mag as bouncers. Both women were employed by Monell as lieutenants in his local criminal organization, which included shanghaiing, and the latter woman supposedly kept a collection of human ears which she had bitten off from unruly customers in bar brawls. She displayed these as trophies on the bar in pickle jars. Sadie the Goat, the later leader of the Charlton Street Gang, was of the many victims who lost her ear in a brawl with Gallus Mag.

'}
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation (Q1894232)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, also called the Parks Department or NYC Parks, is the department of the government of New York City responsible for maintaining the city's parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the city's natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for city's residents and visitors.\n

"}
Connie's Inn (Q5161816)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Connie's Inn was a Harlem, New York City nightclub established in 1923 by Connie Immerman (né Conrad Immerman; 1893–1967) in partnership with two of his brothers, George (1884–1944) and Louie Immerman (1882–1955). Having immigrated from Latvia, the Immerman brothers operated a Harlem delicatessen and made their fortune as bootleggers. Their club was located at 2221 Seventh Avenue at 131st Street from 1923 until 1934. Acts featured there included Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller, Wilbur Sweatman, Peg Leg Bates, Bricktop and Fletcher Henderson. Unlike the Cotton Club, Connie's Inn featured African-American performers but did not restrict its audience to whites only. Members of the Ziegfeld Follies, heiress Gertrude Vanderbilt, and numerous others poured in from downtown to enjoy the shows at Connie's Inn and were sometimes influential in moving their revues to Broadway.\n

"}
Construction of One World Trade Center (Q5164470)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Construction of One World Trade Center was deferred until 2006 because of disputes between the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the developer. Tishman Realty & Construction is the selected builder. The building reached ground level on May 17, 2008, and was topped out on May 10, 2013. One World Trade Center opened to tenants on November 3, 2014, and One World Observatory opened to the public on May 28, 2015.

'}
DeVinne Press Building (Q5244135)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The De Vinne Press Building, located at 393-399 Lafayette Street at the corner of East 4th Street, in the NoHo district of lower Manhattan, New York City, is a brick structure, built in 1885-1886 and designed by the firm of Babb, Cook & Willard in Romanesque Revival style. An addition was made to the building in 1892.

'}
Dolan DNA Learning Center (Q5288848)
{'lang': , 'extract': "


\nThe DNA Learning Center (DNALC) is a genetics learning center affiliated with the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. It is the world's first science center devoted entirely to genetics education and offers online education, class field trips, student summer day camps, and teacher training. The DNALC's family of internet sites cover broad topics including basic heredity, genetic disorders, eugenics, the discovery of the structure of DNA, DNA sequencing, cancer, neuroscience, and plant genetics.\n

"}
Manhattan Plaza (Q6749290)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Plaza is a large federally subsidized residential complex of 46 floors and 428 feet (130\xa0m) at 400 and 484 West 43rd Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City. Opened in 1977, it has 1,689 units and about 3,500 tenants. 70% of the tenants are from the performing arts, 15% are neighborhood residents, and 15% are elderly. It occupies the city block bounded north by 43rd Street, east by Ninth Avenue, south by 42nd Street, and west by Tenth Avenue. Developed by HRH Construction, since January 2004 it has been owned by The Related Companies. Manhattan Plaza is the subject of a documentary titled Miracle on 42nd Street, released in 2017.\n

'}
Manhattan Village Academy (Q6749325)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Village Academy (MVA) is a small, public high school located in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York City. It consists of grades 9–12 with an enrollment of 400 students. The school is part of the New York City Department of Education. The administration is currently headed by principal Christina White. The school was previously headed by Hector Geager who had been the principal of the school since February of 1999.

'}
Matthew Henson Residence (Q6790666)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Matthew Henson Residence is a historic apartment residence at 246 West 150th Street in Manhattan, New York City. Apartment 3F in this building is where Matthew Henson (1866-1955), the African American polar explorer, lived from 1929 until his death. Henson was arguably the first man to reach the Geographic North Pole, a feat that is disputed in part by his own diary. His residence was named a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

'}
Meinhard v. Salmon (Q6810178)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Meinhard v. Salmon, 164 N.E. 545 (N.Y. 1928), is a widely cited case in which the New York Court of Appeals held that partners in a business owe fiduciary duties to one another where a business opportunity arises during the course of the partnership. The court holds that the fiduciary duty of communication was breached where a partner in a joint venture failed to inform his co-partner of a profitable opportunity that was offered by a third-party who was ignorant of the partnership. Furthermore, the duty of loyalty was breached where the partner appropriated to himself a benefit arising from his status as a partner without allowing his co-partner an opportunity to compete. This holding relates to the doctrine of corporate opportunity.\n

'}
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts (Q6834176)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts is the principal theatre of Pace University and is located at the University's New York City campus in Lower Manhattan. Facing City Hall near the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge and blocks from the World Trade Center, it provides performance and assembly facilities to the university and the general public. The box office and theatre entrance are located on 3 Spruce Street, east of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street.\n

"}
Cookfox (Q5167051)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

COOKFOX Architects (formerly Cook+Fox Architects) is a firm of architects founded by Rick Cook and Robert F. Fox, Jr. in 2003. The firm works on both new projects and on the adaptive reuse of existing buildings. COOKFOX is best known for designing the Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park.\n

'}
Cornelius Vanderbilt II House (Q5171466)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cornelius Vanderbilt II House was a mansion built in 1883 at 1 West 57th Street in Manhattan, New York City. It was sold in 1926 and demolished.\n

'}
2008 Times Square bombing (Q6756828)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On the morning of March 6, 2008, an unknown individual placed a small bomb in front of a United States Armed Forces recruiting station in Times Square, located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. There were no injuries. A security camera shows the bomber riding a bicycle as he approaches the station, dismounting the bike and planting the bomb, and then speeding off shortly before the blast.

'}
Manhattan Neighborhood Network (Q6749293)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) is an American non-profit organization that broadcasts programming on five public-access television cable TV stations in Manhattan, New York City. The country’s largest community media center, MNN operates two community media centers – in midtown Manhattan and East Harlem – and provides education, equipment, facilities, and programs to community producers and organizations who want to create programming to air on one of MNN's five channels. In 2016, MNN will post more than 5,000 enrollments in their media classes, making one of the largest media education institutions in New York City.\n

"}
Manhattan Theatre (Q6749314)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Manhattan Theatre was located at 102 West 33rd Street in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, directly across from Greeley Square at Sixth Avenue and 33rd Street. It was a 1,100-seat theatre which opened in 1875 as the Eagle Variety Theatre, and later renamed the Standard Theatre in 1878. All but destroyed by a fire in 1883, it was re-built in a more modern style and re-opened in December, 1884. In 1898, the Standard was re-furbished by architect Howard Constable and renamed the Manhattan.

'}
Marbridge Building (Q6755272)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Marbridge Building is an office establishment located at 1328 Broadway between 34th and 35th Streets, on the east side of Herald Square, Manhattan, New York City. It opened in 1909, an 11-story building, utilized in part by Rogers Peet. Until October 1910 it stood opposite the Alpine apartment house, which was at the northeast corner of Broadway and 33rd Street. The Alpine and old stores between 33rd and 34th Streets were demolished to make room for the $5,000,000 Hotel McAlpin near the end of 1910. On the other side of Broadway were located the Macy's and Saks Incorporated stores, with the Gimbels store just below.

"}
Marea (Q6758739)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Marea is an Italian and seafood restaurant located at 240 Central Park South (between Broadway and Seventh Avenue) in Manhattan in New York City, opened in May 2009 by chef Michael White.

'}
Strand Theatre (Q6769881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Strand Theatre was an early movie palace located at 1579 Broadway, at the northwest corner of 47th Street and Broadway in Times Square, New York City. Opened in 1914, the theater was later known as the Mark Strand Theatre, the Warner Theatre, and the Cinerama Theatre. It closed as the RKO Warner Twin Theatre, and was demolished in 1987.\n

'}
McGown's Pass Tavern (Q6801411)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

McGown's Pass Tavern was a refreshment house on McGowan's Pass in Central Park in New York City, near 104th Street west of Fifth Avenue. It was built in 1883–84 and closed in 1915.

"}
Metro Pictures Gallery (Q6824666)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nMetro Pictures is a New York City art gallery founded in 1980 by Janelle Reiring, previously of Castelli Gallery, and Helene Winer, previously of Artists Space. It was located in SoHo until 1995 when it moved to Chelsea.

'}
Manhattan West (Q1890301)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan West is a 5.4-million-square-foot (500,000\xa0m2) mixed-use development by Brookfield Properties, being built as part of the Hudson Yards Redevelopment. The project consists of two large office towers and two smaller residential towers, as well as a 1.5-acre (0.6-hectare) public park. The towers are being built on a platform over Penn Station storage tracks along Ninth Avenue. The buildings are close to the Hudson Yards mega-development to the west across Tenth Avenue. Upon its completion, the taller west tower will extend 995 feet (303\xa0m) up to its roof and will be one of the tallest buildings in New York City.

'}
Marquis Theatre (Q6772686)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Marquis Theatre is a Broadway theatre located on the third floor of the New York Marriott Marquis at 210 W. 46th Street in midtown-Manhattan.\n

'}
Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem (Q6821345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem (Hebrew: מתיבתא תפארת ירושלים\u200e, Mesivta Tiferet Yerushaláyim) is a yeshiva in New York City, and one of the oldest existent yeshivot in the city. It is renowned for being the institution formerly led by Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, and is currently led by his son Rabbi Dovid Feinstein.\n

'}
Metropolitan Savings Bank Building (Q6825235)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metropolitan Savings Bank Building opened on May 22, 1867 at the northeast corner of Third Avenue (Manhattan) – now Cooper Square – and East 7th Street, in New York City. The building, which was designed by architect Carl Pfeiffer in Second Empire style, is four stories high, 45 feet (14\xa0m) wide and 75 feet (23\xa0m) deep, and was considered at the time it opened to be one of the most finely constructed edifices, "from garret to basement." Its facades were composed of white marble, with the upper floor being enclosed by a mansard roof. The building was fireproof, as no combustible materials were used during construction, either internally or externally. The entire cost of the structure was $150,000.\n

'}
Milbank, Brinckerhoff, and Fiske Halls (Q6850818)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Milbank, Brinckerhoff, and Fiske Halls are historic buildings located on the campus of Barnard College in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City. The three interconnected buildings are collectively known as Milbank Hall. They were designed by Charles A. Rich (1854–1943), built between 1897 and 1898, and contain classrooms, laboratories, administrative offices and dormitory. They are four stories on a raised basement built of dark red brick with white limestone and terra cotta details. They combine Italian Renaissance massing and detail with Colonial Revival inspired features.

'}
Mulberry Street (Q1934308)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mulberry Street is a principal thoroughfare in Manhattan in New York City. It is historically associated with Italian-American culture and history, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was the heart of Manhattan's Little Italy.\n

"}
Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (Q6773401)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy, also known as Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB), MTA (Manhattan Talmudical Academy) or TMSTA, is an Orthodox Jewish day school (or yeshiva) and the boys' prep school of Yeshiva University (YU) in the Washington Heights neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is the brother school to the Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls.

"}
Martha Washington Hotel (Q6774600)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Redbury New York, formerly known as the Martha Washington Hotel is a historic hotel at 29 East 29th Street, between Madison Avenue and Park Avenue South in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built from 1901 to 1903, and was designed by Robert W. Gibson in the Renaissance Revival style for the Women's Hotel Company. It was originally a women's only hotel.\n

"}
Metropolitan Hotel (Q6825112)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metropolitan Hotel in Manhattan, New York City, opened September 1, 1852, and was demolished in 1895. It was built at a time of a "hotel boom" in response to the opening of the New York Crystal Palace exhibition of 1853.\n

'}
Metropolitan Park (Q6825180)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Metropolitan Park is a former baseball ground located in East Harlem, Manhattan, New York. The ground was the part-time home to the New York Metropolitans of the American Association in 1884.\n

'}
Matthew Marks Gallery (Q6790924)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nMatthew Marks is an art gallery located in the New York City neighborhood of Chelsea and the Los Angeles neighborhood of West Hollywood. Founded in 1991 by Matthew Marks, it specializes in modern and contemporary painting, sculpture, photography, installation art, film, and drawings and prints. The gallery has three exhibition spaces in New York City and two in Los Angeles.

'}
McBurney School (Q6800060)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

McBurney School was a college preparatory school in Manhattan run by the YMCA of Greater New York. Its name commemorates Robert Ross McBurney, a prominent New York YMCA leader during the late 19th century.\n

'}
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research (Q6749265)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research (renamed in 1981 from the International Center for Economic Policy Studies) is a conservative 501(c)(3) non-profit American think tank focused on domestic policy and urban affairs, established in New York City in 1977 by Antony Fisher and William J. Casey. The organization describes its mission as to "develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility". Its message is communicated through books, articles, interviews, speeches, op-eds, and through the institute\'s quarterly publication City Journal.\n

'}
Mas (Q6782218)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mas (farmhouse) (pronounced as either "mah" or "mahs") is a New American and French restaurant located at 39 Downing Street (between Bedford Street and Varick Street) in the West Village in Manhattan, in New York City. It was established in 2004.

'}
Maxine Elliott Theatre (Q6795966)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Maxine Elliott's Theatre was a Broadway theater located at 109 West 39th Street in Manhattan. Built in 1908, it was demolished in 1960. The theater was designed by architect Benjamin Marshall of the Chicago firm Marshall and Fox.\n

"}
McGowan's Pass (Q6801403)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

McGowan\'s Pass (sometimes spelled "McGown\'s") is a topographical feature of Central Park in New York City, just west of Fifth Avenue and north of 102nd Street. It has been incorporated into the park\'s East Drive since the early 1860s. A steep hill descending into a switchback road, it is a popular training route for competitive bicyclists and runners. \n

'}
Memorial to Victims of the Injustice of the Holocaust (Q6815573)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Memorial to Victims of the Injustice of the Holocaust in New York City is a sculpture by Harriet Feigenbaum, on the side of the Appellate Division Courthouse of New York State, at Madison Avenue and 25th Street in Manhattan, United States.\n

'}
Metropolitan Playhouse (Q6825188)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metropolitan Playhouse of New York is a resident producing theater in New York City\'s East Village. Founded in 1992, the theater is devoted to presenting plays that explore American culture and history, including seldom-produced, "lost" American plays and new plays about or derived from American history and literature. Included among its best known revivals are Abram Hill\'s On Strivers Row, Owen Davis\'s Pulitzer Prize winning Icebound, George L. Aiken\'s adaptation of Uncle Tom\'s Cabin, Jacob Gordin\'s The Jewish King Lear (in a translation by Ruth Gay), The Great Divide by William Vaughn Moody, The Drunkard by W. H. Smith, Inheritors by Susan Glaspell, The Melting Pot by Israel Zangwill, The City by Clyde Fitch, Metamora by John Augustus Stone, Sun-Up by Lula Vollmer, and The New York Idea by Langdon Mitchell, and numerous early one-act plays by Eugene O\'Neill. The company has also staged three \'Living Newspapers\' from the Federal Theater Project: Arthur Arent\'s Power in 2007, One-Third of a Nation in 2011, and Injunction Granted in 2015.\n

'}
Mikell's (Q6849430)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mikell's was a jazz club on the corner of 97th Street and Columbus Avenue, in New York City.\n

"}
Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment (Q6850786)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment is a graduate school at The New School within The Schools of Public Engagement that offers degrees in environmental policy and sustainability studies, nonprofit management, organizational change management, public policy and urban policy, as well as a PhD. program in public and urban policy and three graduate certificates.\n

'}
Michael Werner Gallery (Q6835292)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Galerie Michael Werner is a German art gallery. It was started in Cologne, in Nordrhein-Westfalen in western Germany, in 1969 by Michael Werner, who had taken over the Galerie Hake there.:505 Werner showed work by post-War German artists such as Georg Baselitz, Jörg Immendorff, A.R. Penck and Sigmar Polke.

'}
Chatham Theatre (Q5087695)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
For the other New York City theatre known by this name, see Chatham Garden Theatre.

The Chatham Theatre or Chatham Street Theatre was a playhouse on the southeast side of Chatham Street (now Park Row) in New York City. It was located at numbers 143-9, between Roosevelt and James streets, a few blocks south of the Bowery. At its opening in 1839, the Chatham was a neighborhood establishment, which featured big-name actors and drama. By the mid-1840s, it had become primarily a venue for blackface minstrel shows. Frank S. Chanfrau restored some of its grandeur in 1848.\n

'}
Cheetah (Q5089451)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cheetah was a nightclub located on Broadway at 53rd\xa0Street in Manhattan, New York City. The club opened on May 28, 1966, and closed in the 1970s. Robert Hilsky and Russell Hilsky were associated with the club.

'}
Chogye International Zen Center (Q5103855)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chogye International Zen Center is a Kwan Um School of Zen practice center founded by Seung Sahn in 1975, located in New York City. The center offers a daily practice regimen, as well as retreats and workshops. Wu Kwang is the guiding teacher and resident Zen Master, the abbot is Steven Cohen.Prebish, Charles S (1999). Luminous Passage: The Practice and Study of Buddhism in America. University of California Press. pp.\xa034. ISBN\xa00-520-21697-0.
Morreale, Don (1998). The Complete Guide to Buddhist America. Shambhala Publications. pp.\xa0171.

'}
Chung King Studios (Q5116315)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chung King Recording Studios, formerly known as Chung King House of Metal, was a New York City recording studio founded by John King with financial backing of the Etches brothers and engineer expertise of Steve Ett, which became a site of many classic punk and hip hop recordings. King started Secret Society Records in 1979 before building a studio on Centre Street in Chinatown—Chung King, and during early work with Def Jam Recordings, Rick Rubin dubbed the studio the Chung King House of Metal—and therefore changed the name of the company in 1986. Modern musicians and engineers had used Chung King Studios in many ways and the studio hosted world-famous artists such as Amy Winehouse, Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, and Jay Z.

'}
Church of St. Joseph in Greenwich Village (Q5117267)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Joseph in Greenwich Village is a Roman Catholic parish church located at 365 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) at the corner of Washington Place in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Constructed in 1833–1834, it is the oldest church in New York City specifically built to be a Roman Catholic sanctuary.

'}
Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy Houses (Q5117963)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy House at 406-412 East 14th Street between First Avenue and Avenue A in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City were built in 1894-96 by Grace Church, one of the most prominent Episcopal churches in the city at the time. The buildings were a free chapel – meaning there was no pew rent – called Grace Chapel and a connected Grace Hospital, which could serve 16 senior citizens and 10 children, and was physically connected to the chapel by a bridge, so that patients could be wheeled to services.

'}
Women's National Republican Club (Q11705349)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Women's National Republican Club is the oldest private club for Republican women in the United States, and was founded by Henrietta Wells Livermore in 1921.The club grew out of the earlier women's suffrage movement in NY which led to the Nineteenth Amendment. The club built its third and current home at 23 West 51st Street, New York, New York in 1934. That Neo-Georgian style building was built on the former site of Andrew Carnegie's home and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

"}
Snapple Theater Center (Q14475911)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Theater Center (known as The Snapple Theater Center until 2016) is a multi-theater entertainment complex located on the corner of 50th Street and Broadway in New York City.\n

'}
93rd Street (Q14706153)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

93rd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 86th Street. The next northbound stop was 99th Street.\n

'}
assassination of Meir Kahane (Q14706162)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Meir Kahane, an Israeli-American rabbi and politician, was assassinated on 5 November 1990 (18 Cheshvan 5751), shortly after 9:00\xa0p.m. at the New York Marriott East Side, a hotel in Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Christ Church Lutheran (Q5108813)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Christ Church Lutheran is an Evangelical Lutheran Church in America church located near Union Square in Manhattan, New York City at 123 East 15th Street at Irving Place, in the Seafarer and International House. The congregation was founded as the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Christ in 1868, and has had four premises in its history.\n

'}
Church of the Divine Unity (Q5117838)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of the Divine Unity was a former Unitarian and Universalist church located on the east side of Broadway between Prince and Spring Streets, SoHo (Manhattan). It was built c.1845 and likely transferred to American Unitarian Association after c. 1854. Subsequently, it was adaptively reused as an art gallery ("Düsseldorf Gallery"), then an office, and finally was demolished sometime before 1866.

'}
Church of the Incarnation, Roman Catholic (Q5117968)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
Not to be confused with the Church of the Incarnation, Episcopal (Manhattan) on Madison Avenue and 30th Street

The Church of the Incarnation is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 1290 St. Nicholas Avenue (Juan Pablo Duarte Blvd.) at the corner of 175th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue, Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City, New York. The church is known as "the St. Patrick\'s Cathedral of Washington Heights"

'}
Charles Egan Gallery (Q5077332)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Charles Egan Gallery opened at 63 East 57th Street (Manhattan) in about 1945, when Charles Egan was in his mid-30s. Egan\'s artists helped him fix up the gallery: "Isamu Noguchi did the lighting... Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline painted the walls."

'}
Vesey Street (Q1592975)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Vesey Street ( VEE-zee) is a street in New York City that runs east-west in Lower Manhattan. The street is named after Rev. William Vesey (1674-1746), the first rector of nearby Trinity Church.

'}
Chelsea Corners (Q5090063)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chelsea Corners was an apartment complex begun in 1931 at 15th Street and 16th Street, in Chelsea, Manhattan. It is currently a co-op. The first building was completed at 200 West 16th Street in May 1931. The development was never finished, but its completion was planned for fall 1931. The Great Depression caused it to remain unfinished.\n

'}
Church of the Holy Agony (Q5117875)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of the Holy Agony was a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 1834 Third Avenue and 101st Street, in the East Harlem section of Manhattan, New York City. The parish was established in 1930 as a mission of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal. The parish is staffed by the Vincentian Fathers.\n

'}
Church of the Messiah (Q5117991)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Second Congregational Church in New York, organized in 1825, was a Unitarian congregation which had three permanent homes in Manhattan, New York City, the second of which became a theater after they left it. In 1919 the congregation became non-denominational and changed its name to Community Church of New York. The same year its church, on 34th Street, was damaged by fire. Since 1948 the congregation has been located at 40 East 35th Street, in a sanctuary shared with the Metropolitan Synagogue of New York.

'}
Rivington Arms (Q7338883)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rivington Arms was an art gallery in New York City.\n

'}
Rogers Peet Building (Q7359329)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rogers Peet Building was a five-story structure which was built in City Hall Park, Manhattan, New York City, in 1863. It was home to the Rogers Peet clothing store until December 4, 1898. It belonged to the Emanuel Hoffman estate and was one of the historic buildings of New York City. The edifice, located at Broadway and Warren Street, burned entirely during a fire which accounted for more than $1 million in property losses. Today, the site is occupied by part of the Home Life Insurance Company Building.\n

'}
E. V. Haughwout Building (Q1589264)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The E.V. Haughwout Building is a five-story, 79-foot (24 m) tall, commercial loft building in the SoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, at the corner of Broome Street and Broadway. Built in 1857 to a design by John P. Gaynor, with cast-iron facades for two street-fronts provided by Daniel D. Badger's Architectural Iron Works, it originally housed Eder V. Haughwout's fashionable emporium, which sold imported cut glass and silverware as well as its own handpainted china and fine chandeliers, and which attracted many wealthy clients – including Mary Todd Lincoln, who had new official White House china painted here. It was also the location of the world's first successful passenger elevator.\n

"}
Lafayette Street (Q1592949)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lafayette Street is a major north-south street in New York City's Lower Manhattan. It originates at the intersection of Reade Street and Centre Street, one block north of Chambers Street. The one-way street then successively runs through Chinatown, Little Italy, NoLIta, and NoHo and finally, between East 9th and East 10th Streets, merges with Fourth Avenue. A buffered bike lane runs outside the left traffic lane. North of Spring Street, Lafayette Street is northbound (uptown)-only; south of Spring Street, Lafayette is southbound (downtown)-only.\n

"}
Chateau Moderne (Q5087539)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chateau Moderne was a Manhattan night club which was popular in the 1930s. It was located in a no longer extant building at 42 East 50th Street, between 5th and Madison Avenues. The establishment entered a not guilty plea to income tax evasion in Manhattan United States Federal Court on July 19, 1939.

'}
Church of the Assumption (Q5117809)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of the Assumption is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 427 West 49th Street in Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Church Street School for Music and Art (Q5116715)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Church Street School for Music and Art, located in Tribeca, New York, is the area's only non-profit school for the arts. The institution has served the downtown and outer community since 1990.\n

"}
R. C. Williams Warehouse (Q7273537)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The R.C. Williams Warehouse is a Modern Movement style building in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York City designed by architect Cass Gilbert. It is located on the west side of 10th Avenue between 25th and 26th Streets and was built for a wholesale grocery company, the R.C. Williams Company. The design is a smaller version of Gilbert's design for the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

"}
Rebecca School (Q7301904)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Rebecca School is a private day school in New York City that specializes in teaching children ages four to twenty-one who have a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The school was founded in 2006 and uses a special teaching method known as Floortime/DIR (Developmental, Individual-difference, Relationship-based) developed by Dr. Stanley Greenspan, a child psychiatrist and specialist in autism education who died in 2010. Dr. Greenspan's method was a change from the more traditional methods that sought to change behavior through conditioning using rewards and punishments. His method focuses on children's ability to build relationships. Rebecca School's space and facilities on East 30th Street were specially designed for the needs of autistic and special needs children, based on Dr. Greenspan's ideas. The school utilizes not only teachers who are trained to work with special needs students, but also social workers who work with the families of the students.

"}
Repertorio Español (Q7313980)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Repertorio Español was founded in 1968 by Producer Gilberto Zaldívar and Artistic Director René Buch to introduce the best of Latin American, Spanish, and Hispanic American theater to broad-ranging audiences in New York City and around the country. Robert Weber Federico joined the company two years later as Resident Designer and Associate Artistic Producer and is currently the organization’s Executive Director.\n

'}
Richmond Hill (Q7330865)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Richmond Hill was a colonial estate in Manhattan, New York City, that was built on a 26-acre (110,000\xa0m2) parcel of the "King\'s Farm" obtained on a 99-year lease in 1767 from Trinity Church by Major Abraham Mortier, paymaster of the British army in the colony. Part of the site is now the Charlton-King-Vandam Historic District of Manhattan\'s Hudson Square neighborhood.\n

'}
Robert K. Kraft Field at Lawrence A. Wien Stadium (Q7346228)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Robert K. Kraft Field at Lawrence A. Wien Stadium, officially known as Robert K. Kraft Field at Lawrence A. Wien Stadium at Baker Athletics Complex, is a stadium in the Inwood neighborhood at the northern tip of the island of Manhattan, New York City. Part of Columbia University's Baker Athletics Complex, it is primarily used for American football, lacrosse, and track and field events. The stadium opened in 1984 and holds 17,100 people.\n

"}
Rose Museum (Q7367872)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Rose Museum, located on the second floor of Manhattan's Carnegie Hall at 154 West 57th Street, is a small museum dedicated to the history of Carnegie Hall. The museum, which opened in 1991, was funded by the Susan and Elihu Rose Foundation and includes more than 2,500 feet of archives and more than a century of concert programs. The plan when the museum opened was to supplement its permanent collection with a series of rotating exhibits. The museum also focuses on the Hall's uncertain future following the growth of Lincoln Center and the sale of Carnegie Hall in the late 1950s leading to the campaign preservation spearheaded by Isaac Stern and New York City's purchase of the Hall in 1960 for a sum of $5 million as well as its being declared a National Historic Landmark in 1962.

"}
Ross Global Academy (Q7369359)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ross Global Academy Charter School, or RGA, was a public charter school located in Lower Manhattan. It opened in September 2006 with more than 160 students. It was closed in 2011 by New York City and state officials for various reasons, including poor performance.

'}
130 Liberty Street (Q1586672)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

5 World Trade Center (also referred to as 130 Liberty Street) is a planned skyscraper at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The site is across Liberty Street, to the south of the main 16-acre (6.5\xa0ha) World Trade Center site. As of June 2018, the project is on standby while the Port Authority explores a potential sale of the lot to a developer and looks for tenants to occupy the skyscraper. The proposed building shares its name with the original 5 World Trade Center, which was heavily damaged as a result of the collapse of the North Tower during the September 11 attacks and was later demolished. The Port Authority has no plans to construct a building at 130 Liberty Street, although it is open to future development of the site as office, retail, hotel, residential or some mix of those uses.

'}
Charles M. Schwab House (Q5080502)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Charles M. Schwab House (also called Riverside) was an extravagant, 75 room mansion located on Riverside Drive between West 73rd and West 74th Streets, on the Upper West Side in New York City. It was constructed for steel magnate Charles M. Schwab and was the grandest and most ambitious house ever built on the island of Manhattan. The home was considered by many to be the classic example of a "white elephant", as it was built on the "wrong" side of Central Park away from the more fashionable Upper East Side.

'}
Chatham Garden Theatre (Q5087648)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Chatham Garden Theatre or Chatham Theatre was a playhouse in the Chatham Gardens of New York City. It was located on the north side of Chatham Street on Park Row between Pearl and Duane streets in lower Manhattan. The grounds ran through to Augustus Street. The Chatham Garden Theatre was the first major competition to the high-class Park Theatre, though in its later years it sank to the bottom of New York's stratified theatrical order, below even the Bowery Theatre.\n

"}
Chatham Square (Q5087689)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chatham Square was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and one island platform that served trains of both the IRT Second Avenue Line and IRT Third Avenue Line. The upper level had three tracks and two island platforms that served trains of both lines going to and from City Hall. Second Avenue trains served the station until June 13, 1942, and City Hall Spur trains served the station until December 31, 1953. This station closed entirely on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
Chico Mendez Mural Garden (Q5096436)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Chico Mendez Mural Garden was a community garden located on the Lower East Side of New York City. Named after Brazilian environmentalist and activist Chico Mendes, the garden was demolished on December 31, 1997.\n

'}
Church of Our Lady of the Scapular of Mount Carmel (Q5116987)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of Our Lady of the Scapular of Mount Carmel was a former Roman Catholic parish church that was demolished. The church was located 341 East 28th Street between First and Second Avenues in the Kips Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The parish was established in 1889. The building is believed to have been erected that year, designed in the Country Gothic style. It was previously staffed by the Carmelite Fathers and was the original location of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, which had been established in 1941 and was moved to Middletown, New York in 1991.

'}
Reuben's Restaurant (Q7317397)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Reuben's Restaurant and Delicatessen was a landmark restaurant and deli in New York City.\n

"}
Rivington Street (Q7338894)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rivington Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line on the New York City Subway. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms while the upper level had one track that served the express trains. The next stop to the north was First Street. The next stop to the south was Grand Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
Guggenheim Museum SoHo (Q15032075)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Guggenheim Museum SoHo was a branch of the Guggenheim Museum designed by Arata Isozaki that was located at the corner of Broadway and Prince Street in Manhattan's SoHo neighborhood, New York City. The museum opened in 1992 and closed in 2001 after hosting exhibits that included Marc Chagall and the Jewish Theater, Paul Klee at the Guggenheim Museum, Robert Rauschenberg: A Retrospective, and Andy Warhol: The Last Supper, which served as a key part of the museum's permanent collection. The closing was initially hoped to be temporary, but the museum closed permanently in 2002.

"}
Universal Concepts Unlimited (Q15031991)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Universal Concepts Unlimited (UCU) was a pioneering art gallery in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York City that investigated the artistic merit of new technologies based on the emerging digital art scene. UCU existed between the years 2000 and 2006. It was owned and run by Wolf-Dieter Stoeffelmeier and Marian Ziola.\n

'}
Leo Baeck Institute New York (Q15242248)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) is a founding partner of the Center for Jewish History and a research library and archive in New York that contains the most significant collection of source material relating to the history of German-speaking Jewry, from its origins to the Holocaust, and continuing to the present day.

'}
Southbridge Towers (Q7569231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southbridge Towers is a large housing cooperative development located in the Civic Center neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City. The complex was built between 1961 and 1971 by Tishman Realty & Construction as a subsidized co-op under the Mitchell-Lama housing program. It is situated south of the entrance ramp to the Brooklyn Bridge between Pearl Street, Frankfort Street, Gold Street, and Fulton Street. Southbridge consists of four 27-story towers and five 6-story buildings, which collectively include 1,651 apartments with a total of 331,577 square feet (30,804.5\xa0m2) of floor area.

'}
William Ziegler House (Q14707802)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William Ziegler House was a mansion located on 2 East 63rd Street in New York City. It was constructed for William Ziegler.\n

'}
BiCE Ristorante (Q15032096)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

BiCE Ristorante (or known simply as BiCE) was an Italian restaurant located in New York City. Opening in 1987, the restaurant was popular with an upscale New York City clientele. It was described, soon after opening, by The New York Times as being "too chic, too crowded, too self-consciously European—yet everyone wants to visit." The restaurant almost closed in 2011 due to financial troubles. Crain\'s New York Business called BiCE an "institution". BiCE closed permanently in 2014.\n

'}
IDT Megabite Cafe (Q15227634)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

IDT Megabite Cafe (also known as IDT Mega Bite Cafe) is a cybercafe and sushi bar in New York City. It is considered to be the world's first kosher cybercafe.

"}
Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Center (Q7402270)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Saint Vincent Catholic Medical Centers (Saint Vincent\'s, or SVCMC) was a healthcare system, anchored by its flagship hospital, St. Vincent\'s Hospital Manhattan, locally referred to as "St. Vincent\'s". St. Vincent\'s was founded in 1849 and was a major teaching hospital in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It closed on April 30, 2010, under circumstances that triggered an investigation by the Manhattan District Attorney. Demolition began at the end of 2012 and was completed in early 2013. Other hospital buildings are being converted into luxury condos and a new luxury building, Greenwich Lane, has replaced the St. Vincent\'s building.\n

'}
Samuel Osgood House (Q7412321)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Samuel Osgood House (demolished in 1856), also known as the Walter Franklin House, was an eighteenth-century mansion at the northeast corner of what was Pearl and Cherry Streets (Today Pearl and Dover Streets) in what is now Civic Center, Manhattan, New York City. It served as the first Presidential Mansion, housing George Washington, his family, and household staff, from April 23, 1789, to February 23, 1790, during New York City's two-year term as the national capital.\n

"}
Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House (Q7421606)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House is a building that was built in 1908 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The Neo-Georgian townhouse was designed by Charles A. Platt for Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt in 1907. It originally held "two mirror-image residences with a single facade and entrance. Each first floor had its own front reception room with a welcoming fireplace. Rear parlors could be combined through sliding doors." The house was given to the Roosevelts by Franklin\'s mother as a wedding gift for them. The house was originally two homes and Franklin\'s mother had doors put in place so she could enter their part of the home whenever she wanted. \n\nThe house was used by Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt from its completion in 1908 to her death in 1941, and intermittently by Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt from construction to their sale of the house to Hunter College in 1943. After his mother\'s death in 1941, President Roosevelt and his wife placed the house up for sale and a non-profit consortium was organized to purchase the house on behalf of Hunter College.

'}
Sawkill (Q7428650)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Sawkill or Saw-kill (the Dutch place-name for Saw Mill Creek) was the largest hydrological network on Manhattan island prior to the founding of the Dutch colony of New Netherland in 1624. This 44,980-foot-long (13,710\xa0m) stream began "within four blocks of the Hudson River":

'}
Sheffield Farms Stable (Q7492664)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sheffield Farms Stable was a historic stable located in Manhattanville, New York, New York. Designed by Frank A. Rooke, it was a six-story, light colored brick building with terracotta ornament. It was originally built in 1903 as a two-story stable building for the Sheffield Farms dairy, then expanded to its present size in 1909. It housed horses used for the delivery of pasteurized milk until July 1938. It was sold in 1942, after which it housed a real estate company, insurance company, and warehouse.

'}
United Nations Slavery Memorial (Q14707548)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

United Nations Slavery Memorial, officially known as The Permanent Memorial at the United Nations in Honour of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, is an installation at the Headquarters of the United Nations in New York City intended as a permanent reminder of the long-lasting effects of slavery and the slave trade.

'}
Von Steuben Day (Q14707612)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Von Steuben Day is a holiday traditionally held on a weekend in mid-September (von Steuben was born September 17), celebrating the Prussian-born Baron Friedrich von Steuben, who arrived in the United States as a volunteer offering his services to General George Washington in the American Revolutionary War. Von Steuben is still regarded as one of the most important German Americans, as his training of the young American troops made victory against the British possible and thus his work helped in gaining independence for the United States of America. The day is generally considered the German-American event of the year; celebrations focus on parades in which participants march, dance, and play music.\n

'}
The Brentmore (Q15032061)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Brentmore at 88 Central Park West, on the Upper West Side of New York City, is an apartment building that faces the west side of Central Park. It is on the southwest corner of 69th Street.

'}
Schroeder Romero & Shredder (Q7432898)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nSchroeder Romero & Shredder is a contemporary art gallery located in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City. Gallerist Lisa Schroeder has professed a preference for conceptual and sociopolitical art.\n

'}
Sherman Creek Generating Station (Q7495153)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Sherman Creek Generating Station was a coal-fired power plant built by the United Electric Light and Power Company in New York City, on Manhattan Island at 201st Street and the Harlem River. The station supplied power to many customers, including the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad via the West Farms Substation.\n

'}
Silk Centre (Q7515170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Silk Centre was an area of business property, composed of buildings and lofts, which opened in Manhattan, in 1924. It was adjacent to a car-barn site, numerous clothing firms, and advertising agents located within a block or two of this corner. Harper & Brothers was also situated on East 33rd Street.

'}
Soundlab (Q7564869)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Soundlab was a collective of artists, both sound and visual, that started in the East Village, New York City around the mid 1990s. The founding members were Howard Goldkrand, Beth Coleman and Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky. The collective included many musicians and artists from the Illbient scene including DJ Olive, Lloop, Dj Wally, A.K. Atoms, Kit Krash, Acoustyk aka MegMan, Lucy Walker and Tim Sweet.\n

'}
Church of Our Lady of the Scapular-St. Stephen (Q5116985)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of Our Lady of the Scapular–St. Stephen is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 149 East 28th Street between Third and Lexington Avenues in the Rose Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was established in the 1980s when the parish of the Church of Our Lady of the Scapular of Mount Carmel was merged into the parish of the Church of St. Stephen the Martyr. In January 2007, it was announced by the Archdiocese of New York that the Church of the Sacred Hearts of Mary and Jesus, located at 307 East 33rd Street, was to be merged into Our Lady of the Scapular–St. Stephen, then, in November 2014, the Archdiocese announced that the Church of Our Lady of the Scapular–St. Stephen was one of 31 neighborhood parishes which would be merged into other parishes. Our Lady of the Scapular–St. Stephen was to be merged into the Church of Our Saviour at 59 Park Avenue.

'}
High School of Art and Design (Q12060065)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The High School of Art and Design is a Career and Technical Education high school in Manhattan, New York City. Founded in 1936 as the School of Industrial Art, the school moved to 1075 Second Avenue in 1960 and more recently, its Midtown Manhattan location on 56th Street, between Second and Third Avenues, in September 2012. High School of Art and Design is operated by the New York City Department of Education.\n

'}
West Street pedestrian bridges (Q14707762)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Street pedestrian bridges are pedestrian bridges that cross West Street to connect the neighborhoods of Tribeca and the Financial District with Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The bridges were built to provide alternatives to crossing the busy street. Prior to the September 11 attacks, there were three bridges at Chambers Street, Vesey Street and Liberty Street. The Vesey Street and Liberty Street bridges connected the former World Trade Center complex with the World Financial Center.\n

'}
Hunter Sportsplex (Q15032124)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hunter Sportsplex is a multi-purpose sports facility located in Manhattan, New York, within the campus of Hunter College of the City University of New York.\n

'}
United Nations Statistical Commission (Q15042419)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The United Nations Statistical Commission (StatCom) is a Functional Commission of the UN Economic and Social Council established in 1946. It oversees the work of the United Nations Economic and Social Council. Its 24 member states are elected by the Economic and Social Council on the basis of the following geographical distribution: African states (5), Asian States (4), Eastern European States (4), Latin American and Caribbean States (4), Western European and other States (7). Since July 1999 the Commission meets every year. As set forth by the Economic and Social Council, in the terms of reference, the Commission shall assist the Council:\n

'}
Audubon Park Historic District, New York City (Q15193977)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Audubon Park Historic District is located on five blocks in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, between West 155th Street and West 158th Street, and between Broadway and Edward M. Morgan Place on the east and Riverside Drive West on the west. It consists of 19 large apartment buildings and one duplex house, and abuts the Audubon Terrace Historic District on the southeast. It is named for naturalist John James Audubon, who purchased 20 acres of land there in 1841, at a time when the area was still mostly farms, woodland and the country estates of the rich. After his death, the estate was sold off in parcels for development by Audubon\'s widow, which is when it became known as "Audubon Park".

'}
Better Out Than In (Q15198756)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Better Out Than In was a residency undertaken by pseudonymous graffiti artist and political activist Banksy in New York City during October 2013. Banksy unveiled at least one work of art daily, documenting it on both a dedicated website and an Instagram account. The majority of the works were stencil graffiti and chiefly political, a distinctive characteristic of Banksy. Other pieces and multimedia exhibits toyed with dark humor and satire.\n

'}
Salon 94 (Q7405667)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nSalon 94 is an art gallery in New York City owned by Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn.\n

'}
Santos Party House (Q7420633)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Santos Party House was a New York City nightclub located at 96 Lafayette Street between Walker and White Streets in the TriBeCa neighborhood of downtown Manhattan. Originally named the "Lafayette Street Jungle Gym", Santos Party House was recognized as the "Best New Nightclub" by Paper magazine\'s Annual Nightlife Awards, and has also won awards for its parties, sound system, lighting, and dance floor.\n

'}
Schechter Day School Network (Q7431022)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Schechter Day School Network, formerly the Solomon Schechter Day School Association, located at 820 Second Avenue, New York, New York, is the organization of Jewish day schools that identify with Conservative Judaism. The network provides guidance and resources for its member schools in the United States and Canada.\n

'}
Scheffel Hall (Q7431076)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Scheffel Hall at 190 Third Avenue in the Gramercy Park neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1894–1895, and designed by Henry Adams Weber and Hubert Drosser, at a time when the area south of it was known as Kleindeutschland ("Little Germany") due to the large number of German immigrants who lived nearby. The building, which served as a beer hall and restaurant, was modeled after an early 17th-century building in Heidelberg Castle, the "Friedrichsbau", and was named after Joseph Viktor von Scheffel, a German poet and novelist. It later became known as Allaire\'s, a name still inscribed on the building. The building\'s style has been described as "German-American eclectic Renaissance Revival".

'}
Second Avenue Deli (Q7443041)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Second Avenue Deli (also known as 2nd Ave Deli) is a certified-kosher delicatessen in Manhattan, New York City. In December 2007, it relocated to 162 East 33rd Street (between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue) in Murray Hill. In August 2011, it opened a second branch at 1442 First Avenue (East 75th Street) on the Upper East Side. In November 2017, it opened a cocktail lounge called 2nd Floor above its Upper East Side branch.

'}
Shearwater (Q7492220)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Shearwater is an 81.5-foot (24.8\xa0m) wooden schooner docked in Lower Manhattan in New York City in the U.S. state of New York. The schooner was designed by Theodore Donald Wells and built by the Rice Brothers Corporation in East Boothbay, Maine in 1929. During World War II, it was requisitioned into the United States Coast Guard to patrol for German U-boats. The Shearwater completed a circumnavigation of the world in the early-1980s and later worked as a research laboratory for the University of Pennsylvania's Institute of Environmental Medicine. Docked about 200 yards (180\xa0m) west of the site of the World Trade Center, it is operated by Manhattan by Sail, which gives 90-minute-long tours of New York Harbor, and is licensed to carry 48\xa0passengers. The schooner was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

"}
Sheridan Square Playhouse (Q7494915)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Sheridan Square Playhouse was an Off-Broadway theatre in New York City that was active from 1958 through the early 1990s. Closed as a theatre in 1996, the theatre was located at 99 7th Avenue South in Greenwich Village.

'}
South Ferry Plaza (Q7567222)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The South Ferry Plaza, also called A Lighthouse At The Tip Of The Island, was a supertall skyscraper proposed in 1987 to rise right next to the East River on Manhattan Island in New York City. The building would have sat on top of the South Ferry terminal and tower 1,084\xa0ft (330\xa0m) above street level, with 60 stories of office space. It was designed by architect Fox & Fowle Architects and Leslie E. Robertson Associates. The architects designed the building for office use and the skyscraper incorporated recycled marble and steel with glass in its structure. The architectural plan had a glass dome that was supposed to be lit at night, which also contained an observation deck and three restaurants located inside the dome. In addition, the project called for the renovation of the South Ferry Terminal, including the train station so it can accommodate 100,000 people. The project would have doubled the size of Battery Park if it had proceeded, since the building included a plaza that was planned to tie in with Battery Park via a new promenade at the tip of Manhattan. However, the project was cancelled due to financial reasons.

'}
Rialto Theatre (1935-1998) (Q15032193)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Rialto Theatre was a movie palace in New York City located at 1481 Broadway, at the corner of 42nd Street, within the Broadway Theater District of Manhattan. \n

'}
Generator Sound Art (Q15221518)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Generator Sound Art is an experimental arts and culture organization based in New York City, co-owned by the sound artists 'Gen' Ken Montgomery and Scott Konzelmann. It focuses upon the work of dedicated Sound Artists, and is an umbrella organization that either facilitated or continues to facilitate the activities of the Generator gallery / exhibition space, the Generations Unlimited audio recording label, and a second, eponymous audio recording label. Generator as a physical gallery / exhibition space existed in the East Village and then in Chelsea from 1989–1992.\n

"}
Sasabune (Q7424960)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sasabune is a Japanese sushi restaurant located at 401 East 73rd Street (between First Avenue and York Avenue) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, in New York City.

'}
Schinasi House (Q7431328)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Schinasi House is a 12,000-square-foot (1,100\xa0m2), 35-room marble mansion on Riverside Drive in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1907 for Sephardic Jewish tobacco baron Morris Schinasi. The mansion was designed by Carnegie Hall architect William Tuthill and reportedly retains almost all of its historic detail, including a Prohibition-era trap door that once extended all the way to the river.

'}
Solomon Schechter High School of New York (Q7558739)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Solomon Schechter High School of New York was a coeducational Jewish high school located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The school, which was affiliated with the Conservative Movement of Judaism and a member of the Solomon Schechter Day School Association, merged in 2006 with the New Jersey-based Schechter Regional High School, to form the Metro Schechter Academy, which in turn closed permanently in 2007. SSHSNY was a laboratory school of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and provided students with a dual general and Judaic studies curriculum.\n

'}
Soup Kitchen International (Q7565045)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Original Soupman is a chain of soup restaurants originally run by Ali "Al" Yeganeh, modeled after Yeganeh\'s original restaurant Soup Kitchen International, which was a well-known soup restaurant at 259-A West 55th Street (between Broadway and 8th Avenue), in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Fort Washington (Q1438808)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fort Washington was a fortified position near the north end of Manhattan Island, at the island's highest point, within the modern-day neighborhood of Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City. The Fort Washington Site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

"}
Jane Kahan Gallery (Q6152428)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Jane Kahan Gallery is an art gallery located in New York City that specializes in modern art. The gallery is regarded for its collection of prints, monotypes, and multiples, including ceramics and works on paper by Pablo Picasso, and tapestries by artists such as Romare Bearden, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Sonia Delaunay, Roberto Sebastián Matta, and Fernand Léger. Established by art dealer and collector Jane Kahan in 1973 following graduation from Mount Holyoke College, the gallery initially operated as Kahan Esikoff Fine Arts prior to changing the name to Jane Kahan Gallery. The gallery maintains its original space on the Upper East Side and an exhibition space in Lower Manhattan.\n

'}
Janet Borden Inc. (Q6153216)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Janet Borden, Inc. is a contemporary art gallery located in New York City. The gallery specializes in contemporary photography, representing Robert H. Cumming, Jan Groover, Martin Parr, John Pfahl and others.\n

'}
Jewish Theological Seminary library fire (Q6189969)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jewish Theological Seminary library fire was discovered on Monday, April 18, 1966, at 10:15 AM when smoke was seen pouring from one of the small upper windows of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America library tower at Broadway and 122nd Street in New York City.\n

'}
The Lambs (Q9086916)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lambs, Inc. (aka The Lambs Club) is a social club in New York City for actors, songwriters, and others involved in the theatre. It is America\'s oldest theatrical organization. "The Lambs" is a registered trademark of The Lambs, Inc.; and the club has been commonly referred to as The Lambs Club and The Lambs Theater since 1874.

'}
Grolier Club (Q5174002)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grolier Club is a private club and society of bibliophiles in New York City. Founded in January 1884, it is the oldest existing bibliophilic club in North America. The club is named after Jean Grolier de Servières, Viscount d\'Aguisy, Treasurer General of France, whose library was famous; his motto, "Io. Grolierii et amicorum" [of or belonging to Jean Grolier and his friends], suggested his generosity in sharing books. The Club\'s stated objective is "the literary study of the arts pertaining to the production of books, including the occasional publication of books designed to illustrate, promote and encourage these arts; and the acquisition, furnishing and maintenance of a suitable club building for the safekeeping of its property, wherein meetings, lectures and exhibitions shall take place from time to time\xa0..."

'}
James Striar School of General Jewish Studies (Q6143759)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The James Striar School of General Jewish Studies, informally known as the Mechinah Program, is a comprehensive program in Jewish studies for students seeking to improve and further their basic skills and knowledge of Jewish studies. JSS is the only school in the country designed for college-age students who wish to pursue Jewish studies on either beginning or intermediate level while taking a regular college program simultaneously on the same campus. The program teaches the fundamentals of Jewish scholarship and heritage through a unique curriculum which consists of courses in Hebrew language, Bible, Jewish History, Talmud, and Jewish Philosophy, Laws and Customs.

'}
New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture (Q9049779)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Whitney Museum of American Art original building is a collection of three 1838 rowhouses located at 8–12 West 8th Street between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. In 1907, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney established the Whitney Studio Gallery at 8 West 8th Street adjacent to her own MacDougal Alley studio. This, and the later Whitney Studio Club at 147 West 4th Street, were intended to provide young artists with places to meet and exhibit their works.

'}
Irving Place Theatre (Q6139943)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Irving Place Theatre was located at the southwest corner of Irving Place and East 15th Street in the Union Square neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1888, it served as a German language theatre, a Yiddish theatre, a burlesque house, a union meeting hall, a legitimate theatre and a movie theatre. It was demolished in 1984.

'}
Varick Street (Q1495179)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Varick Street runs north-south primarily in the Hudson Square district of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Varick Street's northern terminus is in the West Village, where it is a continuation of Seventh Avenue South south of Clarkson Street. It continues downtown through Hudson Square and TriBeCa until it reaches Leonard Street, where it merges with West Broadway. Motor traffic is one-way southbound. Major east-west streets crossed include Houston Street and Canal Street. Approaching Broome Street, the two rightmost lanes of Varick Street are reserved for traffic entering the Holland Tunnel, where backups often occur at rush hour.\n

"}
Jarmulowsky Bank Building (Q6160383)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jarmulowsky Bank Building is a 12-story building formerly housing the Jarmulowsky Bank on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Located at Canal Street and Orchard Street, the Jarmulowsky Bank Building was built by architects Rouse & Goldstone in 1912, in Beaux-Arts style. The building is faced with limestone at its lower section and architectural terracotta on its higher section.\n

'}
Jefferson School of Social Science (Q6175579)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jefferson School of Social Science was an adult education institution of the Communist Party USA located in New York City. The so-called "Jeff School" was launched in 1944 as a successor to the party\'s New York Workers School, albeit skewed more towards community outreach and education rather than the training of party functionaries and activists, as had been the primary mission of its predecessor. Peaking in size in 1947 and 1948 with an attendance of about 5,000, the Jefferson School was embroiled in controversy during the McCarthy period including a 1954 legal battle with the Subversive Activities Control Board over the school\'s refusal to register as a so-called "Communist-controlled organization."\n

'}
Kemble Building (Q6386884)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Kemble Building was an eight story edifice located at 15 - 25 Whitehall Street between Bridge Street and Stone Street (Manhattan). It stood opposite the Custom House in Manhattan, New York. Owned by the Ogden Goelet Estate, the structure adjoined the seven story Produce Exchange Building. At first employed as a cotton warehouse, it was used for office space beginning in 1882. Prior to the Kemble Building's erection, the site was occupied by the business of Hendrick Willemsen, a baker and bread inspector.

"}
Jay Gould House (Q6166659)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jay Gould House was a mansion located at 857 Fifth Avenue at East 67th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was constructed for Jay Gould in the French Neo-Gothic style, and given by Gould to his son George Jay Gould in 1868. The younger Gould tore the mansion down in 1906, and had the George J. Gould House built in its place.

'}
Jerome Mansion (Q6182827)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Jerome Mansion was a mansion located on the corner of East 26th Street and Madison Avenue, across from Madison Square Park in the modern neighborhood of NoMad in Manhattan, New York City. It was the home of financier Leonard Jerome, one of the city's richest and most influential men in the middle- to late-19th century. It was built from 1859 to 1865, and demolished in 1906.

"}
Joseph Raphael De Lamar House (Q6286489)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Joseph Raphael De Lamar House is a mansion located at 233 Madison Avenue at the corner of 37th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1902-05 and was designed by C. P. H. Gilbert in the Beaux-Arts style. The De Lamar Mansion marked a stark departure from Gilbert's traditional style of French Gothic architecture and was instead robustly Beaux-Arts, heavy with rusticated stonework, balconies and a colossal mansard roof. The mansion is the largest in Murray Hill and one of the most spectacular in the city; the interiors are as lavish as the exterior.

"}
John Street Theatre (Q6259426)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

John Street Theatre, situated at 15–21 John Street, sometimes called "The Birthplace of American Theatre," was the first permanent theatre in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York. It opened on December 7, 1767, and was operated for several decades by the American Company. It closed on January 13, 1798.\n

'}
Ratner's (Q6317076)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Ratner's was a famous Jewish kosher dairy (milkhik) restaurant on the Lower East Side of New York City. Since it did not serve meat in deference to the kosher rule about not mixing milk and meat products, it was often regarded as a complement to Katz's Deli.

"}
WDVB-CD (Q10392789)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WDVB-CD, virtual channel 23 (UHF digital channel 22), is a low-powered, Class A Hillsong Channel owned-and-operated television station licensed to Edison, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. Owned by the Trinity Broadcasting Network, it is sister to Jersey City, New Jersey-licensed, TBN owned-and-operated station WTBY-TV (channel 54). The two stations share studios on Union Square in Manhattan and transmitter facilities atop the Empire State Building.\n

'}
B-25 Empire State Building crash (Q1434082)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Empire State Building B-25 crash was a 1945 aircraft accident in which a B-25 Mitchell bomber, piloted in thick fog over New York City, crashed into the Empire State Building. The accident did not compromise the building's structural integrity, but it did cause fourteen deaths (three crewmen and eleven people in the building) and damage estimated at US$1\xa0million (equivalent to about $14M in 2019).

"}
General Theological Seminary (Q1501676)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church (GTS) is a seminary of the Episcopal Church in New York. Founded in 1817, GTS is the oldest seminary of the Episcopal Church and a leading center of theological education in the Anglican Communion. The seminary was chartered by an act of the Episcopal Church's General Convention and its name was chosen to reflect its founders vision that it be a seminary to serve the whole Church. Throughout its history, GTS has occupied a mediating position between the broad church tradition and Anglo-Catholicism and its faculty generally reflect the moderate-to-liberal consensus on moral and theological issues espoused by the Episcopal Church.\n

"}
James Speyer House (Q6143443)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The James Speyer House was a mansion located at 1058 Fifth Avenue, on the southeast corner of 87th Street, in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was constructed for James Speyer, a New York City banker. It was a reticent classicizing block of three storeys and a set-back attic storey over a sunk basement lit by a light well; it had five bays on the avenue, where the upper two floors were linked by a colossal order of pilasters, and seven bays on the side street.

'}
Jordan L. Mott House (Q6276682)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jordan L. Mott House was a mansion located on 2122 Fifth Avenue, near 130th Street in the Harlem area of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Julia Richman Education Complex (Q6306684)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Julia Richman Education Complex (JREC) is an educational multiplex located in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Named after the district superintendent of schools, Julia Richman, it houses six autonomous small schools for approximately 1,800 Pre-K through 12th grade students in the former building of Julia Richman High School, a comprehensive high school that operated until 1995. The schools are operated by the New York City Department of Education.\n

'}
Julia Richman High School (Q6306686)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\n

'}
1936 NFL Championship Game (Q10334980)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1936 NFL Championship Game was the fourth championship game played in the National Football League (NFL). It took place on December 13 at Polo Grounds in New York City, making it the second NFL title game held on a neutral field.

'}
e-flux (Q10478728)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

e-flux is a publishing platform and archive, artist project, curatorial platform, and enterprise founded in 1998. The news digest, events, exhibitions, schools, journal, books, and art projects produced and/or disseminated by e-flux describe strains of critical discourse surrounding contemporary art, culture, and theory internationally. Its monthly publication, e-flux journal, has produced essays commissioned since 2008 about cultural, political, and structural paradigms that inform contemporary artistic production.\n

'}
Stuyvesant Square (Q1478163)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Stuyvesant Square is the name of both a park and its surrounding neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The park is located between 15th Street, 17th Street, Rutherford Place, and Nathan D. Perlman Place (formerly Livingston Place). Second Avenue divides the park into two halves, east and west, and each half is surrounded by the original cast-iron fence.

'}
Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS (Q4972429)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS (BC/EFA) is an American nonprofit organization that raises funds for AIDS-related causes across the United States, headquartered in New York City. It is the theatre community's response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. By drawing upon the talents, resources and generosity of the American theatre community, BC/EFA has raised over $300 million for critically needed services for people with AIDS, HIV, and other critical illnesses since its founding in 1988. The organization awards annual grants to over 450 AIDS and family service organizations across all 50 states, Puerto Rico & Washington D.C., and is the single largest financial supporter of the social service programs of The Actors Fund.

"}
Brooks and Hewitt Halls (Q4975066)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brooks and Hewitt Halls are historic dormitory buildings located on the campus of Barnard College in Morningside Heights, New York, New York. Brooks Hall was designed by Charles A. Rich (1854 – 1943) and built in 1906–1907. It is a seven and one half story, red Harvard brick building on a granite foundation with limestone and terra cotta trim. It features a sloping Spanish tile roof with hip-roof dormer windows. Hewitt Hall, named for Abram S. Hewitt, was designed by McKim, Mead & White and built in 1926–1927. It is a seven-story, red Harvard brick building with a sloping copper clad roof.

'}
Bush Terminal Company Building (Q5001420)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Bush Terminal Company Building was a loft structure located on the southwestern Brooklyn, New York waterfront, which was built in the spring of 1911. Its construction coincided with an improvement in the industrial region south of the 39th Street ferry, between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. The property on which the edifice was erected was purchased in part from the New York Dock Company for $30,000,000. The building's completion was part of a plan long contemplated by the company's president Irving T. Bush.

"}
Jason McCoy Inc (Q6163075)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Jason McCoy Inc is a contemporary art gallery established in 1982. The gallery represents an international group of contemporary artists in painting, drawing, photography, video, sculpture, and installation.\n

'}
Jewish Theater of New York (Q6189963)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jewish Theater of New York is a theatre company founded in 1994, with the production of One Hundred Gates by playwright/director Tuvia Tenenbom. \n

'}
John Henry Hammond House (Q6238816)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The John Henry Hammond House is a mansion located on 9 East 91st Street on the Upper East Side in New York City. Since 1994, the Consulate-General of Russia in New York City has been located there. \n

'}
Madison Square Garden (Q9026714)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Madison Square Garden (1890–1926) was an indoor arena in New York City, the second by that name, and the second and last to be located at 26th Street and Madison Avenue in Manhattan. Opened in 1890 at the cost of about $500,000, it replaced the first Madison Square Garden, and hosted numerous events, including boxing matches, orchestral performances, light operas and romantic comedies, the annual French Ball, both the Barnum and the Ringling circuses, and the 1924 Democratic National Convention, which nominated John W. Davis after 103 ballots. The building closed in 1925, and was replaced by the third Madison Square Garden at Eighth Avenue and 50th Street, which was the first to be located away from Madison Square.\n

'}
Sports Museum of America (Q7579760)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Sports Museum of America (SmA) was the United States' first national sports museum dedicated to the history and cultural significance of sports in America. It opened in May 2008 and closed less than nine months later, in February 2009.\n

"}
St. Gabriel's Church (Q7588059)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Gabriel is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, which was located at 310 East 37th Street in Manhattan, New York City.

'}
St. George Academy (Q7588186)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. George Academy is a private, Ukrainian Catholic high school in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It is located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of NY and the Stamford Diocese.\n

'}
St. Mary's Church, 69th Street (Q7590146)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Former Church of St. Mary is a former Roman Catholic parish church. Located at 202 East 69th Street in Manhattan, New York City, the parish was established in 1895; the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York closed it in 1999. \n

'}
St. Matthew's Church (Q7590595)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Matthew is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 215 West 67th Street in Manhattan, New York City. The parish was canonically established in 1902 and suppressed in 1959.\n

'}
Cristo Rey New York High School (Q5186452)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cristo Rey New York High School is a college preparatory, Catholic high school located in East Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, and a member of the Cristo Rey Network of schools. The school follows a unique Corporate Work Study Model, which allows students to spend one day per week interning with multinational corporations such as McKinsey, Pfizer, American Express, and JPMorgan Chase. Since its opening in 2004, Cristo Rey New York has produced 943 alumni who have gone on to attend elite colleges and universities throughout the world. According to its mission statement, the school\'s ultimate goal is "that our students will graduate from college and become professionals for others, transforming the world for the good of their families and society."

'}
Croton Aqueduct Gate House (Q5188979)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Croton Aqueduct Gate House is located in Manhattanville, Manhattan, New York City, New York. The building was built in 1884 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 22, 1983. After being decommissioned in 1984, the below-grade valve chambers were filled and the building sat empty for nearly two decades. Between 2004 and 2006, architects oversaw an adaptive reuse project converting the gate house into theater space for Harlem Stage/Aaron Davis Hall.

'}
Danceteria (Q5215426)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Danceteria was a four-floor nightclub located in New York City, which operated from 1979 until 1986 (and in the Hamptons until 1995). Throughout its history, the club had seven different locations, three in NYC and four in the Hamptons. The second, most famously at 30 West 21st Street in Manhattan, served as the location for the disco scene in the film Desperately Seeking Susan.\n

'}
Daniel LeRoy House (Q5217891)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Daniel LeRoy House is located at 20 St. Marks Place in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The Greek Revival building was built in 1832 as part of a development by Thomas E. Davis of 3½-story brick houses which spanned both sides of the street. The Daniel LeRoy house is one of the three surviving houses of this development, the other two being 25 St. Marks Place and the Hamilton-Holly House at 4 St. Marks Place. It has a marble entrance ornamented with vermiculated blocks. LeRoy was an in-law of Peter Stuyvesant, and a South Street merchant, who lived in the house with his wife Elizabeth Fish, of the eminent Fish family.\n

'}
Delta Psi, Alpha Chapter building (Q5254721)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Delta Psi, Alpha Chapter is located in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The building was built in 1898 west of Columbia University, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 26, 1996.\n

'}
Demos (Q5256354)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Demos is a liberal think tank based in the United States. The group, which was founded in 2000, has a stated mission to "power the movement for a just, inclusive, multiracial democracy."

'}
St. Boniface's Church (Q7587324)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Boniface is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 882 Second Avenue and 47th Street in Manhattan in New York City. The parish was established in 1868 and suppressed in 1950. Its records are now housed at the Church of the Holy Family.\n

'}
Dactyl Foundation (Q5207771)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nDactyl Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit arts organization in New York City founded by New York-based artist Neil Grayson and novelist/philosopher of science V.N. Alexander.\n

'}
Dauphin Hotel (Q5228071)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Dauphin Hotel was an establishment located on the west block front of Broadway between 66th Street and 67th Street. In 1958, the ballroom of the hotel was behind Julia Murphy's Bar. The Dauphin Hotel was demolished as part of the excavation for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. By 1964, the site was taken by the Empire Mutual Insurance Group building. This edifice also occupied the space where the Marie Antoinette Hotel previously stood.\n

"}
De La Salle Institute (Q5244529)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The De La Salle Institute was a Catholic Church school for boys and girls which operated in Manhattan in New York City beginning in the 19th century. From 1902 it was located at 106 West 59th Street, running through to 107 West 58th Street. It fronted 59th Street for 53.5 feet (16.3\xa0m) and faced Central Park. It had a depth of 200 feet (61\xa0m), with 53 feet (16\xa0m) on West 58th Street, and 71 feet (22\xa0m) west on Sixth Avenue. In August 1912 the De La Salle Institute adjoined the German Club on West 59th Street and the Hotel Savilla on West 58th Street.

'}
Dos Blockos (Q5299137)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dos Blockos was a squat situated on East 9th Street in Manhattan, New York City. In active use as a squat from 1992–1999, the six-story building housed as many as 60 people at its peak. The squatters were evicted in 1999 so that the building could be converted into a commercial apartment building.

'}
Spring Street (Q7580682)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Spring Street is a street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which runs west–east, through the neighborhoods of Hudson Square, SoHo, and Nolita. It runs parallel to and between Dominick, Broome, and Kenmare Streets (to the south), and Vandam and Prince Streets (to the north). The street's addresses begin from the Bowery and run ascending to Spring Street's end at West Street, which runs along the Hudson River.

"}
St. Agnes Boys High School (Q7586706)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Saint Agnes Boys High School was a small, all-boys, private Catholic high school on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It was run by the Marist Brothers in conjunction with the Archdiocese of New York. The mascot of St. Agnes was the stag.\n

'}
St. Alphonsus Ligouri's Church (Q7586800)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Church of St. Alphonsus Liguori was a Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 308 West Broadway in SoHo, Manhattan, New York City. It was established as a mission of Most Holy Redeemer in 1847, as a church to serve German-speaking Catholics. The church was at 10 Thompson Street (between Canal and Grand Streets), and the cornerstone of the church was laid by New York's Archbishop John Hughes on September 8, 1847. It remained a mission of Most Holy Redeemer until 1866, when it was elevated to parish status. The church was staffed by the Redemptorist Fathers, and its first pastor was Rev. F. Nicholas Jaeckel.\n

"}
St. Clare's Church (Q7587599)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Clare is a former parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, at 436-438 West 36th Street in Manhattan, New York City. \n

'}
St. Frances Cabrini Shrine (Q7587922)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Frances Xavier Cabrini Shrine is located at 701 Fort Washington Avenue between Fort Tryon Park and West 190th Street, with a facade on Cabrini Boulevard, in the Hudson Heights neighborhood of Washington Heights in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It is dedicated to Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (Mother Cabrini, 1850–1917), who in 1946 became the first American citizen to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church.

'}
St. George Coast Guard Station (Q7588194)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. George Coast Guard Station, or the Staten Island Coast Guard Station, located adjacent to the Staten Island Ferry St. George Terminal, is a complex of 22 historic buildings and was best known for the invention and manufacturing of lighthouse equipment. The Office Building and U.S. Light-House Depot Complex, designed by Alfred B. Mullet and completed in 1865, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and comprise an official New York City Landmark.\n

'}
St. John the Evangelist's Church (Q7588980)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. John the Evangelist is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 355 East 55th Street at First Avenue, Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Coogan's Bluff (Q5166847)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Coogan's Bluff is a promontory near the western shore of the Harlem River in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City. Its boundaries extend approximately from 155th Street and the Macombs Dam Bridge viaduct to 160th Street, between Edgecombe Avenue and the river. A deep escarpment descends 175 feet from Edgecombe Avenue to the river, creating a sheltered area between the bluff and river known as Coogan's Hollow. For 73 years, the hollow was home to the Polo Grounds sports stadium.\n

"}
Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis (Q5170581)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis is a multiple sclerosis research and treatment center in New York City.\n

'}
Cutler School (Q5196882)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cutler School of New York was a primary through college preparatory boys\' school initially located at 713 6th Ave., between 23rd and 24th Street, only a few blocks from the Roosevelt home in Manhattan, New York City, New York. Classes were originally held on the second floor above Burns Oyster and Chop House. The school was established in October 1876 by Arthur Hamilton Cutler. (A.B., Harvard 1870; Ph.D., Princeton 1885). The school\'s founder tutored Theodore Roosevelt, his brother, Elliott Roosevelt, his sister, Corinne Roosevelt, and his future wife, Edith Carow. According to the New York Times, Theodore Roosevelt was the first graduate of the school, although Roosevelt\'s autobiography merely refers to Cutler as his "tutor" for three years, from 1873 until he entered Harvard in 1876.

'}
D&D Studios (Q5203012)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

D&D Studios was a hip hop recording studio located in New York City, New York on the west side of 37th street. Artists that had recorded music at the studios included Jay-Z, Foxy Brown, The Notorious B.I.G., Jaz-O, Nas, Gang Starr, Jeru the Damaja, KRS-One, Violadores del Verso, Big L and Black Moon, among others. \n

'}
Dewey Arch (Q5268170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dewey Arch was a triumphal arch that stood from 1899 to 1900 at Madison Square in Manhattan, New York. It was erected for a parade in honor of Admiral George Dewey celebrating his victory at the Battle of Manila Bay in the Philippines in 1898.

'}
Dillon's Reprise Room (Q5276910)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dillon\'s Reprise Room, is a cabaret, located on West 54th Street in Manhattan\'s Theater District. Over the years, Dillons has been home to successful musical runs of "Our Sinatra," "The Water Coolers," and most recently "Boobs! The Musical," as well as some of cabaret\'s top performers.\n

'}
St. Agnes Chapel (Q7586712)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Agnes Chapel was an Upper West Side Episcopal "plant chapel" of Trinity Church (New York City), one of many. It was located at 121-147 West 91st Street, between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues. It was at first reused by its parish school and then demolished for a gymnasium in the 1940s.

'}
Schermerhorn Row Block (Q7431201)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Schermerhorn Row Block, located at #2 through #18 Fulton Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, was constructed in 1811–12 in the Federal style, and is now part of the South Street Seaport. Each of the individual houses were designated New York City Landmarks in 1968, and the block was collectively added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.\n

'}
The New School for Drama (Q14707455)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

School of Drama at The New School is a multidisciplinary training program for theater arts, located at 151 Bank Street, and 55 West 13th Street New York City part of The New School's College of Performing Arts.\n

"}
St. Francis Hospital of The Sisters Of The Poor Of St. Francis (Q7587973)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Francis Hospital is a former Catholic hospital which operated in New York City during the 19th and 20th centuries.\n

'}
St. Leo's Church (Q7589514)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Leo was a Roman Catholic parish church closed under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 11 East 28th Street, between Fifth and Madison Avenues in Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Continental Baths (Q5165255)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Continental Baths was a gay bathhouse in the basement of The Ansonia Hotel in New York City, which was opened in 1968 by Steve Ostrow. It was advertised as reminiscent of "the glory of ancient Rome". The documentary film Continental by Malcolm Ingram covers the height of the club\'s popularity through the early 1970s.

'}
Croton Distributing Reservoir (Q5188981)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Croton Distributing Reservoir, also known as the Murray Hill Reservoir, was an above-ground reservoir at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Covering 4-acre (16,000\xa0m2) and holding 20\xa0million US gallons (76,000\xa0m3), it supplied the city with drinking water during the 19th century. Its massive 50-foot-high (15\xa0m) granite walls, which presented a vaguely Egyptian-style facade, were 25 feet (7.6\xa0m) thick. Atop the walls was a public promenade offering panoramic views; Edgar Allan Poe enjoyed walking there.

'}
Cafe Rouge (Q5017109)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Café Rouge was the main restaurant in New York's Hotel Pennsylvania. It now operates as a multi-purpose venue, known as Station 32.\n

"}
Desbrosses Street (Q5263661)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Desbrosses Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had three tracks, one island platform and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It opened on November 23, 1873 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was Franklin Street, while the next southbound express stop was Warren Street. The next northbound stop was Houston Street, while the next northbound express stop was Christopher Street. The station was located one block east of the Desbrosses Street Ferry's slip which provided connections to the railroad terminals in at Exchange Place and Pavonia.\n

"}
Dinacharya Institute (Q5277881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Dinacharya Institute is a college specializing in the field of Ayurveda. The Institute was founded by Dr. Bhaswati Bhattacharya in 2007 to train practitioners in Ayurvedic medicine and promote the Ayurvedic community in New York City.

'}
Division Street (Q5284469)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Division Street is a one-way street in the Two Bridges district of Lower Manhattan. It runs in a northeasterly direction with westbound traffic and passes beneath the Manhattan Bridge. It begins at the intersection of Canal Street and Ludlow Street and runs westward to Bowery. It is mostly residential.\n

'}
Education in Harlem (Q5341036)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Education in and around the neighborhood of Harlem, in Manhattan, New York City, is provided in schools and institutions of higher education, both public and private. For many decades, Harlem has had a lower quality of public education than wealthier sections of the city. It is mostly lower-income. But also check out the Harlem Children's Zone

"}
Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School (Q5341475)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School is a New York City Public Alternative High School located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Known for many years simply as "West Side High," it was renamed in honor of the school\'s longtime principal following his unexpected death in 2001.\n

'}
Edward S. Harkness House (Q5345168)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edward S. Harkness House, located at 1 East 75th Street and Fifth Avenue, is a mansion in the Upper East Side of New York City. It was constructed between 1907 and 1908 for Edward Harkness by James Gamble Rogers, a principal of the firm Hale & Rogers.

'}
New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (Q7013701)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, Inc. ("New York Lawyers" or "NYLPI" [nil-pee]) is a non-profit civil rights law firm located in New York City, specializing in the areas of disability rights, access to health care and environmental justice.\n

'}
Ninth Street (Q7039237)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ninth Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It opened on August 26, 1878 and had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track with two side platforms over the lower level local tracks which served express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
Numero 28 (Q7069674)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Numero 28 is an Italian restaurant chain, headquartered New York City, with outlets in Austin and Miami Beach.\n

'}
Nyack College (Q7070780)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Nyack College ( (listen)) is a private Christian college affiliated with the Christian and Missionary Alliance and located in New York City, New York. Enrolling just over 1,000 students, the school is organized in three academic divisions, including the Alliance Theological Seminary, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Graduate and Professional Programs. Nyack offers both on-campus and online courses as part of its undergraduate, graduate, and seminary programs.\n

'}
OK Harris Gallery (Q7072631)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The OK Harris Gallery was an art gallery located at 383 West Broadway in SoHo, New York City. The gallery closed in 2014. Founded by longtime art dealer Ivan Karp after leaving the Leo Castelli gallery in 1969 where he had worked as gallery co-director for nearly 10 years. Karp opened his own gallery called the OK Harris Gallery in SoHo (which at the time was one of the first galleries in the newest gallery district in New York City).\n

'}
Drisha Institute (Q5307804)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Drisha Institute for Jewish Education is a center for advanced Jewish learning located on the Upper West Side of New York City. Though initially founded to promote advanced scholarship for women, it has since expanded to offer an array of text-based learning opportunities for men and women of all ages. Its stated mission is to provide students with the opportunity to encounter texts in an intellectually rigorous and inclusive manner.\n

'}
Dyckman Street (Q5318531)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dyckman Street (sometimes called West 200th Street; DIKE-man) is a street in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is commonly considered to be a crosstown street because it runs from the Hudson River to the Harlem River and intersects Broadway. However, in its true geographical orientation, Dyckman Street runs roughly from north-northwest to south-southeast, and the majority of the street that lies southeast of Broadway runs closer to a north-south direction than east-west.\n

'}
Engineering Societies' Building and Engineers' Club (Q5377858)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Engineering Societies' Building and Engineers' Club is located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building was built in 1907 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 30, 2007.\n

"}
New York City Police Foundation (Q7013277)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York City Police Foundation was established in 1971 by business and civic leaders as an independent, non-profit organization to strengthen the services of the New York City Police Department and to improve public safety in New York City.

'}
New York City Police Riot (Q7013279)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York City Police Riot of 1857, known at the time as the Great Police Riot, was a conflict which occurred in front of New York City Hall between the recently dissolved New York Municipal Police and the newly formed Metropolitan Police on June 16, 1857. Arising over New York City Mayor Fernando Wood's appointment of Charles Devlin over Daniel Conover for the position of city street commissioner, amid rumors that Devlin purchased the office for $50,000 from Wood, Municipal police battled Metropolitan officers attempting to arrest Mayor Wood.\n

"}
New York Coliseum (Q7013358)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Coliseum was a convention center that stood at Columbus Circle in Manhattan, New York City, from 1956 to 2000. It was designed by architects Leon and Lionel Levy in a modified International Style, and included both a low building with exhibition space and a 26-story office block. The project also included the construction of a housing development directly behind the complex.\n

'}
New York Hospital (Q7013596)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Hospital, also known as Old New York Hospital or City Hospital, was founded in 1771 with a charter from King George III, and is the second oldest hospital in Manhattan, New York City, and the third oldest in the United States. It was originally located on Broadway between Duane Street and Anthony Street (now Worth Street). In 1998 it merged with Presbyterian Hospital to form NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital.\n

'}
O'Neill Building (Q7071907)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The O'Neill Building is a landmarked former department store, located at 655-671 Sixth Avenue between West 20th and 21st Streets in the Flatiron District neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The building was originally Hugh O'Neill's Dry Goods Store, and was designed by Mortimer C. Merritt in the neo-Grec style. It was built to four stories in two stages between 1887 and 1890, to allow the existing O'Neill store to continue operating during construction, with the addition of a fifth floor in 1895, created by raising the pediment. The gilded corner domes of this cast-iron-fronted building were restored c.2000.

"}
Drowning Girl (Q5308687)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Drowning Girl (also known as Secret Hearts or I Don't Care! I'd Rather Sink) is a 1963 painting in oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas by Roy Lichtenstein. The painting is considered among Lichtenstein's most significant works, perhaps on a par with his acclaimed 1963 diptych Whaam!. One of the most representative paintings of the pop art movement, Drowning Girl was acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in 1971. \n

"}
Edison Theatre (Q5338430)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edison Theatre was a Broadway theatre located in the Hotel Edison at 240 West 47th Street in Midtown Manhattan. \n

'}
Edmond J. Safra Synagogue (Q5338881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edmond J. Safra Synagogue (now known as Congregation Beit Edmond) is an Orthodox Sephardic synagogue located on East 63rd Street off of Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York.\n

'}
Eighth Avenue (Q5349091)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eighth Avenue was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It was built in 1881 by the Manhattan Railway Company as part of an effort to connect the northern end of the Sixth Avenue Line to the Ninth Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms, and was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line. As a result, it became the last station on the Sixth Avenue Line before merging at a sharp curve with the Ninth Avenue Line. On September 11, 1905, 12 people were killed and 42 injured when a train jumped over the rails at the curve on 53rd Street between the Ninth Avenue 50th Street and 59th Street stations. In 1932, the Independent Subway System built the 50th Street Station three blocks to the south on the Eighth Avenue Subway with an additional lower level in 1933, thus rendering the elevated station and line obsolete. It closed on December 4, 1938. The next southbound stop was 50th Street. The next northbound stop was 59th Street.\n

'}
Eighth Street (Q5349122)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eighth Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line, located at the intersection of Eighth Street and First Avenue. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and the upper level had one track that served express trains. The next stop to the north was 14th Street. The next stop to the south was First Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
Eighth Street (Q5349124)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eighth Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had two tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line and opened on June 5, 1878. It closed on December 4, 1938. The next southbound stop was Bleecker Street. The next northbound stop was 14th Street.\n

'}
New York Amsterdam News Building (Q7013013)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York Amsterdam News Building is a historic rowhouse at 2293 Seventh Avenue in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is historically significant as the publishing home of the New York Amsterdam News between 1916 and 1938. During this period, the newspaper became one of the nation's most influential publications covering African-American issues. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. The Amsterdam News now publishes out of a building at 2340 Frederick Douglass Boulevard.\n

"}
New York Blood Center (Q7013074)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Blood Center (NYBC) is a community, nonprofit blood bank based in New York City. Established in 1964 by Dr. Aaron Kellner, NYBC supplies blood to approximately 200 hospitals in the Northeast United States.

'}
New York City Municipal Archives (Q7013243)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York City Municipal Archives (NYCMA) was founded in 1950 and is a division of the New York City Department of Records and Information Services. The Municipal Archives preserves and makes accessible records created by city government (including the mayor's office, city agencies, the City Council, the Comptroller, borough presidents and the Public Advocate). The collections include manuscripts, sound recordings, film and tape footage, maps, blueprints, photographs and digital media.

"}
New York School of Applied Design for Women (Q7013959)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York School of Applied Design for Women, established in 1892, was an early design school for women in New York City. The New York School of Applied Design building was built in 1908 and is now a landmarked building.\n

'}
New York Surrogate's Court (Q7014750)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Surrogate's Court of the State of New York handles all probate and estate proceedings in the New York State Unified Court System. All wills are probated in this court and all estates of people who die without a will are handled in this court. Unclaimed property of the deceased without wills is handled by the Judge of this court. It also handles adoptions.\n

"}
New York Vauxhall Gardens (Q7014832)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden and theater in New York City. It was named for the Vauxhall Gardens of London. Though the venue passed through a long list of owners, and suffered buyouts, closings, relocations, and re-openings, it lasted until the mid-19th century.

'}
Ninth Avenue derailment (Q7039190)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Ninth Avenue derailment, on the Ninth Avenue Elevated in Manhattan on September 11, 1905, was the worst accident on the New York City elevated railways, resulting in 13 deaths and 48 serious injuries.

'}
Nippon Club (Q7039616)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Nippon Club of New York City is a private social club in New York City founded in 1905 by Jōkichi Takamine for Japanese Americans and Japanese nationals.

'}
North Presbyterian Church (Q7056415)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The congregation of North Presbyterian Church, at 525 West 155th Street in Manhattan, New York City, is a combination of three former congregations: North Presbyterian Church (founded in 1847), Washington Heights Presbyterian Church (founded in 1859 and merged with North Church in 1905), and St. Nicholas Avenue Presbyterian Church (founded in 1891 as Lenox Presbyterian Church and merged with North Church in 1927).\n

'}
East 10th Street Historic District (Q5327608)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East 10th Street Historic District is a small historic district located in the Alphabet City area of the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It includes all 26 buildings, numbered 293 to 345, on East 10th Street between Avenue A and Avenue B, across from Tompkins Square Park. The district was designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on January 17, 2012.\n

'}
East Side Hebrew Institute (Q5329366)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East Side Hebrew Institute was a traditional Jewish day school, in the East Village/Alphabet City area of Manhattan, New York City. It was "once one of the major institutions of the Jewish East Side".

'}
East Village Radio (Q5329620)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

East Village Radio (EVR) is an Internet radio station which broadcasts from a storefront studio in the East Village of Manhattan, in New York City. The station shut down on May 23, 2014 and relaunched in conjunction with Dash Radio, June 3, 2015.

'}
Edna McConnell Clark Foundation (Q5340078)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edna McConnell Clark Foundation (also McConnell Clark Foundation, Clark Foundation, or EMCF) is a New York-based institution that currently focuses on providing opportunities for low-income youth (ages 9–24) in the United States. The Foundation makes large, long-term investments, frequently in partnership with other funders, in programs with proven outcomes and growth potential to meet the urgent needs of disadvantaged young people. \nThe foundation previously worked in criminal justice reform,\nsystematic school reform,tropical disease research, and child protection.\n

'}
Shakespeare in the Park (Q7013975)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Shakespeare in the Park (or Free Shakespeare in the Park) is a theatrical program that stages productions of Shakespearean plays at the Delacorte Theater, an open-air theater in New York City's Central Park. The theater and the productions are managed by The Public Theater and tickets are distributed free of charge on the day of the performance. Originally branded as the New York Shakespeare Festival (NYSF) under the direction of Joseph Papp, the institution was renamed in 2002 as part of a larger reorganization by the Public Theater.

"}
North Moore Street (Q7056143)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

N. Moore Street is a moderately trafficked street in TriBeCa, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs roughly east–west between West Broadway and West Street. Automotive traffic is westbound only.\n

'}
Nutter's Battery (Q7070572)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Nutter's Battery was an 1814 earth-and-wood fortification within what is now Central Park, Manhattan, New York City. The battery was located in the North Woods of Central Park, near Harlem Meer. A 1905 history of the area says that it was on the line of Sixth Avenue (Lenox Avenue), between 109th and 110th Streets. Its name came from Valentine Nutter, who owned the surrounding property.

"}
New York Zendo Shobo-Ji (Q7014881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Zendo Shobo-Ji, or Temple of True Dharma, is a Rinzai zen practice facility located in the upper East Side of Manhattan, New York, in the United States. It is operated by the Zen Studies Society. Founded on September 15, 1968 by Zen master Soen Nakagawa Roshi and Eido Tai Shimano Roshi, the building was converted from a garage, formerly a carriage house. Eido Tai Shimano Roshi, now deceased, was the founding abbot. He was succeeded on January 1, 2011, by the current abbot Roko Sherry Chayat Roshi.\n

'}
North American Federation of Temple Youth (Q7053774)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

NFTY: The Reform Jewish Youth Movement (formerly known as the North American Federation for Temple Youth, often referred to simply as NFTY, commonly pronounced "nifty") is the organized youth movement of Reform Judaism in North America. Funded and supported by the Union for Reform Judaism (URJ), NFTY exists to supplement and support Reform youth groups at the synagogue level. About 750 local youth groups affiliate themselves with the organization, comprising over 8,500 youth members.\n

'}
Notre Dame School (Q7063473)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Notre Dame School of Manhattan is a private, Catholic secondary school for girls in New York City, New York. It is located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.\n

'}
Cabrini Boulevard (Q5015842)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cabrini Boulevard spans the Manhattan neighborhood of Hudson Heights, running from West 177th Street in the south, near the George Washington Bridge, to Fort Tryon Park in the north, along an escarpment of Manhattan schist overlooking the Henry Hudson Parkway and the Hudson River. It is the westernmost city street in the neighborhood except for a one block loop formed by Chittenden Avenue, West 187th Street and West 186th Street.\n

'}
Center for Urban Science and Progress (Q5059910)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (commonly referred to as CUSP) is a degree-granting technology and research institute, that is located in Downtown Brooklyn, New York. It is a graduate school of New York University focusing on urban informatics. It opened in September 2013, and is located in NYU's 370 Jay St. building in Downtown Brooklyn.

"}
Chambers Fine Art (Q5069646)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nChambers Fine Art is an art gallery based in New York City and Beijing that specializes in Chinese contemporary art. Opened in New York in 2000 by Christophe Mao. Notable Chinese artists who had their first solo show in the United States at Chambers include: Lu Shengzhong, Shi Jinsong, Hong Hao, Qiu Zhijie, Hong Lei, and Chi Peng. \n

'}
Byron Gallery (Q5004361)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Byron Gallery was an art gallery founded in 1961 by Charles Byron and was located on Madison Avenue, New York, New York in the United States. Byron Gallery exhibited primarily Surrealist masters, emerging contemporary painters and sculptors, and the occasional Old Masters and ancient art exhibit. The gallery closed in 1971.

'}
CRG Gallery (Q5013878)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nCRG Gallery was an art gallery on New York City's Lower East Side, located at 195 Chrystie St. CRG was founded in 1990 by Carla Chammas, Richard Desroche, and Glenn McMillan.

"}
Canterbury Hall, New York City (Q5033656)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Canterbury Hall was an edifice located at 663 Broadway in the 19th century. It was used for entertainment and political meetings. It was a three-story building where bawdy concerts took place. The building had a front of 40 feet and a depth of 125 feet.\n

'}
Capitol Theatre (Q5035943)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Capitol Theatre was a movie palace located at 1645 Broadway, just north of Times Square in New York City, across from the Winter Garden Theatre. Designed by theater architect Thomas W. Lamb, the Capitol seated 4,000 and opened October 24, 1919. After 1924 the flagship theatre of the Loews Theatres chain, the Capitol was known as the premiere site of many Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) films. The Capitol was also noted for presenting live musical revues and many jazz and swing bands on its stage.\n

'}
Bykert Gallery (Q5004105)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bykert Gallery was a contemporary art gallery in New York City between 1966 and 1975, run by Klaus Kertess (1940 - 2016) and Jeff Byers who had been classmates at Yale College, class of 1958. The gallery originally was located at 15 West West 57th Street in Manhattan, (in the same space as the defunct Green Gallery that closed in 1965); it later moved to East 81st Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues. Among the artists who were represented at Bykert are Brice Marden, Chuck Close, Ralph Humphrey, David Novros and Dorothea Rockburne. Artists who showed there with solo exhibitions or in group shows include Jared Bark, Bill Bollinger, Robert Duran, Richard Van Buren, Alan Saret, Michael Goldberg, Ronnie Landfield, Gary Stephan, Deborah Remington, Bob Neuwirth, Paul Mogensen, Judy Rifka, Arleen Schloss, Alan Uglow, Barry Le Va, Thornton Willis, David Novros and Joe Zucker. \n

'}
Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle (Q5040274)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle is one of the special collections housed within The New York Public Library's Stephen A. Schwarzman building. One of the world's leading repositories for the study of English Romanticism, its holdings consist of some 25,000 books, manuscripts, letters, and other objects, chiefly from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Its curator is Dr. Elizabeth Campbell Denlinger, and its assistant curator is Charles Cuykendall Carter.

"}
Center for Book Arts (Q5059528)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Center for Book Arts in New York City is the first organization of its kind in the United States dedicated to contemporary interpretations of the book as an art object while preserving traditional practices of the art of the book.

'}
Centre Market Place (Q5062285)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Centre Market Place is a one block long street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, bordering Mulberry Street to the east, Grand Street to the south, Broome Street to the north, and Centre Street to the west. Centre Market Place was originally an extension of Orange Street (now Baxter Street, which starts at Grand Street, where Centre Market Place ends), before being formally renamed Centre Market Place in April 1837, after Centre Market, which was west of the street. At one time, the street was at the top of a high hill. Currently, local residents consider Centre Market Place to be part of the NoLIta neighborhood.\nAt the southern end of the street, on the corner of Grand Street, is Onieal\'s restaurant, which features a cavernous wine cellar that once served as a speakeasy during Prohibition. Gentlemen of means would walk through the front of the Police Building, perhaps make a contribution to the "widows and orphan fund" and then walk through the cellar corridor connecting the two buildings.

'}
Chamber of Commerce Building (Q5069532)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Chamber of Commerce Building is located on 65 Liberty Street between Nassau Street and Broadway in the Financial District in Manhattan, New York City. The building's architect was James Barnes Baker who designed the building with a Beaux-Arts style. The building is about four stories tall built with Vermont marble and includes a terrace and a mansard roof. The first floor of the building contains the Great Hall where the walls of the hall are filled with portraits of important individuals from American history. Some of the portraits include John Cruger, the first president of the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York, Alexander Hamilton, Ulysses S. Grant and many others.\n

"}
Chapel of Free Grace (Q5073064)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The former Chapel of Free Grace was a former mission chapel built in 1859 by St. George's Episcopal Church. Located at 406 East 19th Street in Manhattan, New York City, it was a gable-fronted steeply pitched masonry Gothic Revival church with a gable rose window. The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Christ (founded 1868) purchased the church building in 1882. The 19th Street building remained the Lutheran congregation's home until it was demolished in 1948 during the development of Stuyvesant Town by Metropolitan Life Insurance.

"}
Mannes College The New School for Music (Q1519151)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mannes School of Music is a music conservatory in The New School, a private research university in New York City. In the fall of 2015, Mannes moved from its previous location on Manhattan's Upper West Side to join the rest of the New School campus in Arnhold Hall at 55 W. 13th Street.

"}
Potter Building (Q1540660)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Potter Building is a building in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The building occupies a full block along Beekman Street with the addresses 38 Park Row to its west and 145 Nassau Street to its east. It was designed by Norris G. Starkweather in a combination of the Queen Anne and neo-Grec styles, as an iron-framed structure.\n

'}
Stable Gallery (Q1511776)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Stable Gallery, originally located on West 58th Street in New York City, was founded in 1953 by Eleanor Ward. The Stable Gallery hosted early solo New York exhibitions for artists including Robert Indiana and Andy Warhol.\n

'}
Café des Artistes (Q5017283)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Café des Artistes was a fine restaurant at One West 67th Street in Manhattan and was owned by George Lang. He closed the restaurant for vacation at the beginning of August 2009 and, while away, then 85-year-old Lang decided to keep it closed permanently. He announced the closure on August 28, 2009. His wife, Jenifer Lang, had been the managing director of the restaurant since 1990.

'}
Casino Theatre (Q5048879)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Casino Theatre was a Broadway theatre located at 1404 Broadway and West 39th Street in New York City. Built in 1882, it was a leading presenter of mostly musicals and operettas until it closed in 1930.

'}
Centre Street (Q5062314)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Centre Street runs north–south in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Centre Street runs from Park Row, through Chinatown, and continues north to Spring Street, where it merges with Lafayette Street. North of Reade Street, Centre Street is northbound-only (south of Reade Street, to the Brooklyn Bridge, Centre Street is two-way).\n

'}
C. Ledyard Blair House (Q5006661)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The C. Ledyard Blair House was a mansion located on 2 East 70th Street in New York City. It was constructed for C. Ledyard Blair.\n

'}
Campus of New York University (Q5028704)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The urban campus of New York University (NYU) is located in Manhattan, and is around Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village, and also is in MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn. NYU is one of the top three largest landowners in New York City.

'}
East River Greenway (Q5036759)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East River Greenway (also called the East River Esplanade) is an approximately 9.44-mile-long (15.19\xa0km) foreshoreway for walking or cycling on the east side of the island of Manhattan on the East River. It is part of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway. The largest portions are operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. It is separated from motor traffic, and many sections also separate pedestrians from cyclists. The greenway is parallel to the Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive for a majority of its length.\n

'}
Casey Kaplan (Q5048527)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nCasey Kaplan is a contemporary art gallery in New York City, in the United States.\n

'}
Cathedral High School (Q5052242)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cathedral High School is an all-girls, private, Roman Catholic high school in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, New York, United States. It is located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.\n

'}
Center for Jewish History (Q5059727)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Center for Jewish History is a partnership of five Jewish history, scholarship, and art organizations in New York City: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute New York, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Together, housed in one location, the partners have separate governing bodies and finances, but collocate resources. The partners' collections make up the biggest repository of Jewish history in the United States. The Center for Jewish History serves as a centralized place of scholarly research, events, exhibitions, and performances. Located within the Center are the Lillian Goldman Reading Room, Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute and a Collection Management & Conservation Wing. The Center for Jewish History is also an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution.\n

"}
Central Park Carousel (Q5061605)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Central Park Carousel, officially the Michael Friedsam Memorial Carousel, is a vintage carousel located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City, at the southern end of the park, near East 65th Street. It is the fourth carousel on the site where it is located.\n

'}
Central Park Hospital (Q5061608)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Central Park Hospital (officially the U.S. General Hospital, Central Park) was a military hospital that operated in New York City during the American Civil War, from 1862 to 1865. It occupied the former grounds of Mount St. Vincent's Academy near 102nd St and East Drive in Central Park, just west of Fifth Avenue and atop the Revolutionary War site of McGowan's Pass. In medical and military records it is usually referred to as the United States General Hospital, Central Park; and sometimes elsewhere as St. Joseph's Military Hospital (as it was named by Sisters of Charity, who built the complex and provided nursing staff).\n

"}
WNYW (Q1540364)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNYW, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 27), is the East Coast flagship station of the Fox television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with Secaucus, New Jersey-licensed MyNetworkTV flagship WWOR-TV (channel 9). The two stations share studios at the Fox Television Center on East 67th Street in Manhattan's Lenox Hill neighborhood; WNYW's transmitter is located at One World Trade Center.\n

"}
Caravaggio (Q5037759)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Caravaggio is an Italian restaurant located at 23 East 74th Street (between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue) on the Upper East Side in Manhattan, in New York City. It is around the corner from the Met Breuer.

'}
Carnegie Hill Tower (Q5043912)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Carnegie Hill Tower is a 32-story condominium building located at 40 East 94th Street in New York City.

'}
Cedar Hill (Q5056746)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cedar Hill is an east-facing slope in Central Park, Manhattan, New York City. The hill is home to many red cedars that form a line of clumps on its crest. Low outcroppings of rock in the mowed turf were grooved and scarred by the last glacial period. \n

'}
Cedar Street Presbyterian Church (Q5056900)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Second Presbyterian Church, also called the Scotch Presbyterian Church, built a sanctuary on the south side of Cedar Street, between Broadway and Nassau Street, in 1768. In 1837, the congregation moved to Grand Street. Today their sanctuary is located in a 16-story apartment building at 360 Central Park West.

'}
Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization (Q5059728)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization at Yeshiva University's Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law organizes conferences, publishes texts, and supports travel and research by graduate students and senior scholars in the fields of Jewish law, legal and political theory, and ethics.\n

"}
Center on Organizational Innovation (Q5060015)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Center on Organizational Innovation (COI) is a research center at Columbia University\'s Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy. The center, established in 2000 and directed by sociologist David Stark, promotes research in the areas of organizational studies, science and technology studies and economic sociology, with an emphasis on innovation and reflexivity.[1]

'}
Center Theatre (Q5059357)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Center Theatre was a theater located at 1230 Sixth Avenue, the southeast corner of West 49th Street in Rockefeller Center in New York City. Seating 3,500, it was originally designed as a movie palace in 1932 and later achieved fame as a showcase for live musical ice-skating spectacles. It was demolished in 1954, the only building in the original Rockefeller Center complex to have been torn down.

'}
Greenwich Village townhouse explosion (Q11094162)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Greenwich Village townhouse explosion occurred on March 6, 1970, in New York, New York, United States. Members of the Weather Underground (Weathermen), an American leftist paramilitary group, were making bombs in the basement of 18 West 11th Street in the Greenwich Village neighborhood, when one of them exploded. The resulting series of three blasts completely destroyed the four-story townhouse and severely damaged those adjacent to it, including the then home of actor Dustin Hoffman and theater critic Mel Gussow. Three Weathermen—Ted Gold, Diana Oughton and Terry Robbins—were killed in the blast, while two survivors, Kathy Boudin and Cathy Wilkerson, were helped out of the wreckage and subsequently fled.

'}
Chelsea Recreation Center (Q14706223)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Chelsea Recreation Center is a community center and athletic facility operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation in Chelsea, Manhattan. At 56,500 square feet (5,250\xa0m2), the building is one of the largest neighborhood recreation centers in New York City, containing a 25-yard six lane pool, volleyball court, basketball court, fitness rooms, dance studios, game rooms, and a computer resource center. The center hosts a wide range of community-oriented classes and events, many of which are free to youth and older adults.

'}
Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts (Q14706263)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, commonly referred to as Lang, is the seminar-style, undergraduate, liberal arts college of The New School. It is located on-campus in Greenwich Village in New York City on West 11th Street off 6th Avenue.

'}
Jones Street (Q14706709)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Jones Street is a street located in Greenwich Village in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs from Bleecker Street and West 4th Street. Jones Street is often confused with Great Jones Street in NoHo, located a little more than a half-mile to the east.\n

'}
Manhattan Day School (Q14706887)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Day School, often referred to as MDS, is a co-educational Modern Orthodox Jewish yeshiva elementary school located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was founded in 1943 as Yeshivat Ohr Torah Community School. MDS is dedicated to the academic, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and social development of each child. Manhattan Day School consists of an Early Childhood (Two year olds - Kindergarten), Lower School (1st - 5th grade) and Middle School (6th - 8th grade). The school is led by Ms. Raizi Chechik.\n

'}
New York City Police Department School Safety Division (Q14707078)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York City Police Department School Safety Division is the law enforcement agency for New York City Department of Education schools. The agency is a division of the New York City Police Department Community Affairs Bureau, and is one of the largest school-based law enforcement agencies in New York City and the United States with approximately 5,000 school safety agents and 200 police officers.\n

'}
Success Academy Charter Schools (Q14707388)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Success Academy Charter Schools, originally Harlem Success Academy, is a charter school operator in New York City. Eva Moskowitz, a former city council member for the Upper East Side, is its founder and CEO. According to the New York Post, Success Academy had 17,700 applicants for 3,288 available seats, which resulted in a wait list of more than 14,000 families for the 2018-2019 school year. It has 47 schools in the New York area and 17,000 students. Two documentary films, The Lottery and Waiting for "Superman", record the intense desire of parents to enroll their children in Success Academy and charter schools like Success Academy.

'}
Houses at 208–218 East 78th Street (Q1619768)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The houses at 208–218 East 78th Street in Manhattan, New York, United States, are a group of six attached brick rowhouses built during the early 1860s, on the south side of the street between Second and Third Avenues. They are the remnant of 15 built along that street as affordable housing when the Upper East Side was just beginning to be developed.\n

'}
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church (Manhattan) (Q12060470)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of the Holy Trinity is an Episcopal parish church located at 316 East 88th Street between First and Second Avenues in the Yorkville neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
New York Women's House of Detention (Q12811135)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York Women's House of Detention was a women's prison in Manhattan, New York City which existed from 1932 to 1974.\n

"}
Marketfield Street (Q13616699)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Marketfield Street is a short one-way, one-block-long alleyway in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The street begins as a southern branch of Beaver Street, then veers east and north, ending at Broad Street. Alternative past names include Exchange Street, Field Street, Fieldmarket Street, Oblique Road, and Petticoat Lane.

'}
10th Avenue (Q14706133)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

10th Avenue is a proposed station, first planned as part of the 7 Subway Extension for the IRT Flushing Line (7 and <7>\u200b trains) of the New York City Subway. It would be located at 10th Avenue and 41st Street and have two tracks and two side platforms if built. Under the original 2007 plan, there would be one street-level entrance for each direction, and no crossovers or crossunders to allow free transfer between directions. The station could be completed if funding became available to build it. Various development proposals since 2009 have included completion of the station.\n

'}
998 Fifth Avenue (Q14706154)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

998 Fifth Avenue is a luxury cooperative on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City located on Fifth Avenue at the northeast corner of East 81st Street.\n

'}
James B. Duke House (Q14706613)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The James B. Duke House is a mansion located at 1 East 78th Street, on the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The house is one of the great extant mansions from "Millionaire\'s Row". It was built for James Buchanan Duke, who was one of the founding partners of American Tobacco Company and the owner of Duke Power. The building has housed the New York University Institute of Fine Arts since 1952.\n

'}
Magic Towne House (Q14706862)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Magic Towne House was a well-known magic show spot on three floors at 1026 Third Avenue, north of 60th Street, New York City, in the 1970s and 1980s. It was a venue for adults in the cabaret as well as having a children's theater for patrons of all ages to see and enjoy magic.\n

"}
New York Biltmore Hotel (Q14707071)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Biltmore Hotel was a luxury hotel in New York City that opened in 1913. It was one of three palatial hotels built as part of the Terminal City development. The others were the Commodore Hotel (currently Grand Hyatt New York), and the Roosevelt Hotel, which is still in operation.\n

'}
New York College of Podiatric Medicine (Q14707079)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York College of Podiatric Medicine (NYCPM) is a private podiatric college in New York City. It is the oldest and largest podiatric medical school in the United States.\n

'}
The Embers (NYC Club) (Q14707433)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Embers was a 1950s and 1960s-era New York City restaurant and nightclub formerly located at 161 East 54th Street between 3rd and Lexington Avenues. It was opened in late 1951 by former jazz musician Ralph Watkins, who had also been involved with clubs such as Bop City and Royal Roost, and featured many notable jazz acts over the years, including Marian McPartland, Joe Bushkin, George Shearing, Jonah Jones, Red Norvo, George Barnes (musician) and Carl Kress, and the Erroll Garner Trio.\n

'}
Old Broadway Synagogue (Q12064722)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Old Broadway Synagogue is an Orthodox Jewish synagogue in the Manhattanville neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City incorporated in 1911 under the name Chevra Talmud Torah Anshei Marovi, by an immigrant named Morris Schiff. Schiff was a Polish immigrant who lived in the Harlem area, an area with a high Jewish population at the time. The building is listed individually on the National Register of Historic Places.\n

'}
Church Street (Q12306358)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Church Street is a short, but heavily travelled, north-south street in Lower Manhattan in New York City. Its southern end is at Trinity Place, of which it is a continuation, and its northern end is at Canal Street.\n

'}
1000 Park Avenue (Q13423105)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

1000 Park Avenue is an apartment building on the Upper East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located at the northwest corner of the intersection of Park Avenue and East 84th Street.\n

'}
The Gaslight Cafe (Q13511772)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gaslight Cafe was a coffeehouse in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York. Also known as The Village Gaslight, it opened in 1958 and became notable as a venue for folk music and other musical acts. It closed in 1971.

'}
Cortlandt Street (Q14627379)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cortlandt Street is located in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It has varied in length over time, but it currently runs east to west for the one block from Broadway to Church Street, then continues an additional block as the non-vehicular Cortlandt Way from Church to Greenwich Street. At its eastern end, the street continues as Maiden Lane.\n

'}
Dey Street (Q14623578)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dey Street is a short street in Lower Manhattan, in New York City. It passes the west side of the World Trade Center site and the World Trade Center Transportation Hub. It runs for one block between Church Street and Broadway. It originally ran to West Street, but the western reaches were demolished to make way for the World Trade Center in the late 1960s. It now extends to Greenwich Street. 15 Dey Street is the site of the first transcontinental telephone call.\n

'}
155th Street (Q14706137)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

155th Street is a crosstown street separating the Harlem and Washington Heights neighborhoods, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is the northernmost of the 155 crosstown streets mapped out in the Commissioner\'s Plan of 1811 that established the numbered street grid in Manhattan. The street consists of a "high portion" which is a major artery through the area, as well as a lesser-used "low portion".\n

'}
Armory on the Hudson (Q14706161)
{'lang': , 'extract': "
  • From a merge: This is a redirect from a page that was merged into another page. This redirect was kept in order to preserve this page's edit history after its content was merged into the target page's content. Please do not remove the tag that generates this text (unless the need to recreate content on this page has been demonstrated) nor delete this page.\n
    • For redirects with substantive page histories that did not result from page merges use {{R with history}} instead.
    • \n
  • \n
"}
Harding Building (Q14706311)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harding Building was an edifice located at 147 - 151 West 35th Street in Manhattan, New York. Six stories tall, it was 66.8 by 100 feet and stood opposite the R.H. Macy & Company building. It adjoined the northeast corner of 7th Avenue (Manhattan). Formerly the Hotel Sturtevant, it had been owned by Edwin Gould and associates until May 1910.\nIt was remodeled by Maurice and Wolf Forman in 1921 and made into a business building. The Harding Building was purchased by new owners in July 1923. They bought the building for investment purposes.

'}
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (Q14706536)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP) is the research arm of the social sciences at Columbia University, formerly known as the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Center for the Social Sciences. ISERP works to produce pioneering social science research and to shape public policy by integrating knowledge and methods across the social scientific disciplines. ISERP organizes an active intellectual community at Columbia University through its Faculty Fellows program, research centers, projects, and training initiatives.\n

'}
WQHT (Q1630673)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WQHT (97.1 FM, "Hot 97") is a commercial radio station in New York City. Owned by Mediaco Holding and operated by Emmis Communications under a shared services agreement, it broadcasts an urban contemporary format.\n

'}
White Columns (Q12072840)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

White Columns is New York City’s oldest alternative non-profit space. White Columns is known as a showcase for up-and-coming artists, and is primarily devoted to emerging artists who are not affiliated with galleries. All work submitted is looked at by the director. Some of the artists receive studio visits and some of those artists are exhibited. White Columns maintained a slide registry of emerging artists, which is now an online curated artist registry.\n

'}
54 Below (Q14706150)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Feinstein's/54 Below is a cabaret and restaurant in New York City owned by Broadway producers Steve Baruch, Richard Frankel, Marc Routh and Tom Viertel. It has hosted shows by such performers as Patti LuPone, Ben Vereen, Marilyn Maye and Barbara Cook. It is located in the basement of Studio 54.\n

"}
Saint Nicholas Avenue (Q1593583)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St. Nicholas Avenue is a major street that runs obliquely north-south through several blocks between 111th and 193rd Streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The route, which follows a course that is much older than the grid pattern of the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, passes through the neighborhoods of Harlem, Hamilton Heights, and Washington Heights. It is believed to follow the course of an old Indian trail that became an important road in the 17th century between the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam and the British New England Colonies. In the post colonial era, it became the western end of the Boston Post Road. The road became a street when row housing was being built in Harlem during its rapid urban expansion following the end of the American Civil War.\n

"}
World Trade Center site (Q1692282)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The World Trade Center site, formerly referred to as "Ground Zero" or "the Pile" immediately after the September 11 attacks, is a 14.6-acre (5.9\xa0ha) area in Lower Manhattan in New York City. The site is bounded by Vesey Street to the north, the West Side Highway to the west, Liberty Street to the south, and Church Street to the east. The Port Authority owns the site\'s land (except for 7 World Trade Center). The previous World Trade Center complex stood on the site until it was destroyed in the September 11 attacks.\n

'}
74th Street (Manhattan) (Q12052613)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\n74th Street is an east–west street carrying pedestrian traffic and eastbound automotive/bicycle traffic in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs through the Upper East Side neighborhood (in ZIP code 10021, where it is known as East 74th Street) and the Upper West Side neighborhood (in ZIP code 10023, where it is known as West 74th Street), on both sides of Central Park.\n

'}
New York Theological Seminary (Q13428369)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York Theological Seminary (NYTS) is a private non-denominational Christian seminary in New York City. It was founded in 1900 as the Bible Teacher's College.\n

"}
Weehawken Street (Q13443365)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Weehawken Street is a short street located in New York City's West Village, in the borough of Manhattan, one block from and parallel to West and Washington Streets, running between Christopher Street and West 10th Street.\n

"}
Astor House (Q14706163)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Astor House was the first luxury hotel in New York City. Located on the corner of Broadway and Vesey Street in what is now Tribeca, Lower Manhattan, it opened in 1836 and soon became the best known hotel in America.\n

'}
WBAI (Q1651267)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WBAI (99.5 MHz), is a non-commercial, listener-supported radio station licensed to New York City. Its programming is a mixture of progressive political news, talk and opinion from a left-leaning, liberal or progressive viewpoint, and music programming featuring a variety of music genres. The station is owned by the Pacifica Foundation with studios located at 388 Atlantic Ave. in Brooklyn and transmitter located at 4 Times Square.\n

'}
Latin Quarter (Q11983435)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Latin Quarter (also known as The LQ) is a nightclub in New York City. The club which originally opened in 1942 featured big-name acts. In recent years it has been a focus of hip hop, reggaeton and salsa music. Its history is similar to that of its competitor the Copacabana.\n

'}
Claremont Riding Academy (Q12055062)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Claremont Riding Academy, originally Claremont Stables, 175 West 89th Street, between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues on Manhattan's Upper West Side, was designed by Frank A. Rooke and built in 1892. Closed in 2007, Claremont was the oldest continuously operated equestrian stable in New York City and the last public stable in Manhattan. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and designated a New York City Landmark in 1990. Since 2010, it has belonged to the Stephen Gaynor School.\n

"}
Maiden Lane (Q13422110)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Maiden Lane is an east–west street in the Financial District of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Its eastern end is at South Street, near the South Street Seaport, and its western end is at Broadway near the World Trade Center site, where it becomes Cortlandt Street.\n

'}
State Street (Q13461917)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

State Street is a short street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. It runs from west Whitehall Street as a continuation of Water Street, then turns north at Battery Park to become its eastern border. Passing Pearl and Bridge Streets, it terminates at the northeast corner of the park, at Bowling Green, where the roadway continues north as Broadway and west as Battery Place. \n

'}
34th Street Ferry (Q14706146)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

34th Street Ferry was a station on the 34th Street Shuttle that branched off of the IRT Third Avenue Line. The elevated spur operated from July 1, 1880, to July 14, 1930. Located on the east side of First Avenue, the station had two tracks and one island platform. It served the 34th Street Ferry Terminal, which provided connecting services to the Long Island Rail Road's passenger terminal in Long Island City.\n

"}
Cafe Wha? (Q2258008)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cafe Wha? is a club at the corner of MacDougal Street and Minetta Lane in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The club has presented numerous musicians and comedians. Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix who was recruited here by his manager Chas Chandler, Andre Alves, Bruce Springsteen, The Velvet Underground, Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys, Kool & the Gang, Peter, Paul and Mary, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, Joan Rivers, Bill Cosby, Richard Pryor, and many others all began their careers at the Wha?

'}
Pfaff's beer cellar (Q7179760)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Pfaff's was a drinking establishment in Manhattan, New York City, known for its literary and artistic clientele.\n

"}
Pier 11/Wall Street (Q7191690)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Pier 11/Wall Street is a pier providing slips to ferries and excursion boats on the East River in the Port of New York and New Jersey. It is located east of South Street and FDR Drive just south of Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The ferry terminal has five landings (A, B, C, D, E), each with two berths, and is used by four privately owned companies. Within walking distance, public transportation includes the New York City Subway's 1\u200b, N, \u200bR, and \u200bW trains at South Ferry – Whitehall Street and 2 and \u200b3 trains at Wall Street; the M55, M15, M15 SBS, M20 New York City Bus routes, and the Staten Island Ferry at the Whitehall Terminal.

"}
Place Matters (Q7200224)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Place Matters project was created to promote the conservation of the places that are culturally or historically significant to New York City. The significance of these places can arise from their contribution to the historical record, from memories involving them, or traditions that were started at them and can be important on an individual or a community level. Place Matters works to recognize all types of significance and their roles in telling a complete history of the city.

'}
Postmasters (Q7234367)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nPostmasters is a contemporary art gallery located in Manhattan's Tribeca neighborhood, owned and directed by Magda Sawon and Tamas Banovich.\n

"}
Prudence Building (Q7252953)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Prudence Building, or Prudence Bonds Building, was a fourteen-story edifice at the southeast corner of Madison Avenue and 43rd Street, in Manhattan, in the U.S. state of New York. It was the headquarters of the Prudence Bonds Corporation, opening in October 1923. Stores on the street level were leased to\naffluent shops. The banking floor was a close likeness of the Bankers Trust Company building at the southeast corner of Fifth Avenue\nand 42nd Street. The Bank of Manhattan was accorded a 21-year lease and moved its headquarters from 40 Wall Street. \n

'}
Paris Theater (Q7756121)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Paris Theater is a 571-seat single-screen movie theater, located in Manhattan in New York City. It often showed art films and foreign films in their original languages. Upon the 2016 closure of the Ziegfeld, the Paris became Manhattan's sole-surviving single-screen cinema. Since November 2019, it has been operated by Netflix.\n

"}
The Real World: Back to New York (Q7759663)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Real World: Back to New York is the tenth season of MTV's reality television series The Real World, which focuses on a group of diverse strangers living together for several months in a different city each season, as cameras follow their lives and interpersonal relationships. It is the second season of The Real World to be filmed in the Mid-Atlantic States region of the United States, specifically in New York after The Real World: New York.\n

"}
The Real World: New York (Q7759671)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Real World (retrospectively referred to as The Real World: New York, to distinguish it from subsequent installments of the series) is the first season of MTV's reality television series The Real World, which focuses on a group of diverse strangers living together for several months as cameras follow their lives and interpersonal relationships. It was created by producers Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray.\n

"}
The Wilbraham (Q7774824)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wilbraham at 282–284 Fifth Avenue or 1 West 30th Street, in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1888–90 as a bachelor apartment hotel. Its "bachelor flats" each consisted of a bedroom and parlor, with bathroom but no kitchen; the communal dining room was on the eighth floor. The building\'s refined and "extraordinarily well detailed" design in commercial Romanesque revival style – which owed much to the Richardsonian Romanesque developed by H.H. Richardson – was the work of the partners David and John Jardine. The Real Estate Record and Guide in 1890 called it "quite an imposing piece of architecture".

'}
Theatre Genesis (Q7777376)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Theatre Genesis was an off-off-Broadway theater founded in 1964 by Ralph Cook. Located in the historic St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery in the East Village of Manhattan, it produced the work of new American playwrights, including Lanford Wilson, Murray Mednick, Leonard Melfi, Walter Hadler, and Sam Shepard. Theatre Genesis is often credited as one of the original off-off-Broadway theaters, along with Joe Cino's Caffe Cino, Ellen Stewart's La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club, and Judson Poets Theatre.\n

"}
Tibor de Nagy Gallery (Q7800521)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Tibor de Nagy Gallery is an art gallery in New York City. It was involved in the discovery of many of the Second Generation Abstract Expressionist Movement’s artists and also representational artists of the era including Nell Blaine, Grace Hartigan, Alfred Leslie, Helen Frankenthaler, Jane Freilicher, Paul Georges, Red Grooms, Ian Hornak, Kenneth Noland, Fairfield Porter and Larry Rivers.\n

'}
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (Q7829354)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) is a private, non-profit, American osteopathic medical school with a main campus in the neighborhood of Central Harlem in New York City, New York and an additional campus located in Middletown, New York, 60 miles from New York City in the Hudson Valley. TouroCOM is a division of Touro College and University System.

'}
Toy Center (Q7830506)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Toy Center, also known as the International Toy Center, is a complex of buildings in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, that for many years was a hub for toy manufacturers and distributors in the United States. It consists of two buildings located between 23rd Street and 25th Street across from Madison Square, where Fifth Avenue and Broadway cross. The American International Toy Fair, the industry's major annual trade show, is held annually in February at both the Toy Center and the Javits Center on 34th Street.\n

"}
Professional Performing Arts School (Q7248009)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Professional Performing Arts School, colloquially known as PPAS, is a public school in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, New York City.\n

"}
The Turin (Q7770727)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Turin is a residential luxury apartment building in New York City built in 1909. It is located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan at 333 Central Park West. The Turin is of Italian Renaissance style. The luxury co-op offers many amenities to its residents, including a 24-hour doorman, fitness center, children's playroom, storage room, and bike room.\n

"}
Throwback (Q7798531)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Throwback (1/3) is a public artwork by American artist Tony Smith, located in the Marsh & McLennan Companies (MMC) Plaza at 1166 Avenue of the Americas in New York City, New York.\n

'}
Thurgood Marshall College Fund (Q7799283)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) is an American non-profit organization that supports and represents nearly 300,000 students attending its 47 member-schools that include public historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), medical schools, and law schools. It is named for the U.S. Supreme Court's first African-American Justice, Thurgood Marshall. Its major partners include McDonald's and several others.

"}
Tilted Arc (Q7803022)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tilted Arc was a controversial public art installation by Richard Serra, displayed in Foley Federal Plaza in Manhattan from 1981 to 1989. The art work consisted of a 120-foot-long, 12-foot-high solid, unfinished plate of rust-covered COR-TEN steel. Advocates characterized it as an important work by a well-known artist that transformed the space and advanced the concept of sculpture, whereas critics focused on its perceived ugliness and saw it as ruining the site. Following an acrimonious public debate, the sculpture was removed in 1989 as the result of a Federal lawsuit and has never been publicly displayed since, in accordance with the artist's wishes.\n

"}
Tompkins Square Park Riot (Q7820367)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Tompkins Square Park riot occurred on August 6–7, 1988 in Tompkins Square Park, located in the East Village and Alphabet City neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as squatters and punks," had largely taken over the park. The East Village and Alphabet City communities were divided about what, if anything, should be done about it. The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, recommended, and the New York City Parks Department adopted, a 1 a.m. curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control. On July 31, a protest rally against the curfew saw several clashes between protesters and police.

'}
Tompkins Square Riot (Q7820368)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Tompkins Square Park riot occurred on January 13, 1874, at Tompkins Square Park in what is now the East Village and Alphabet City neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City. The riot started after the New York City Police Department clashed with a demonstration involving thousands of unemployed civilians.

'}
Society of Illustrators (Q2296922)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Society of Illustrators is a professional society based in New York City. It was founded in 1901 to promote the art of illustration and, since 1959, has held an annual exhibition.\n

'}
Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music (Q7184606)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music is a music school that focuses on Jewish music. It is part of Yeshiva University and its Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary in New York City. Classes are held in the Schottenstein Center on Yeshiva University's Wilf Campus in Manhattan. Courses include nusah hatefilah (prayer chant), cantillation (biblical chant), voice, piano, music theory, history of Jewish music and liturgy, safrut (Hebrew calligraphy), and Sephardic hazzanut (cantorial). \n

"}
Playwrights Horizons Theater School (Q7203566)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Playwrights Horizons Theater School is a studio in the Tisch School of the Arts Undergraduate Department of Drama. Its members are inspired by the synergy that comes in telling stories from every possible angle and diverse perspective. Playwrights champions the philosophy that every performer should write, every writer should direct, every director should design, every designer should perform and, of course, everyone should be on crew. Accordingly, the school invites established and emerging artists to collaborate and create contemporary work for, of, and by its students. Playwrights maintains that the investigation of many methods leads to innovations that invite an exciting and promising future for its students — and for the future of the American theater.\n

'}
Public School 157 (Q7257551)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

P.S. 157 is a historic school building located at 327 St. Nicholas Avenue between West 126th and West 127th Streets in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built from 1896 to 1899 and was designed by C. B. J. Snyder in the Renaissance Revival style. It ceased being a school in 1975, and was converted to rental apartments in 1993.\n

'}
Postcrypt Coffeehouse (Q7234131)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Postcrypt Coffeehouse is an all-acoustic music venue in the basement of St. Paul's Chapel at Columbia University in New York City, run completely by students. Founded in 1964, Postcrypt has hosted many up-and-coming folk musicians, including Jeff Buckley, Dar Williams, Shawn Colvin, and Ani DiFranco, David Bromberg . Additionally, Suzanne Vega, a graduate of Barnard College, returns to Postcrypt each Spring to play one secret concert. The young folk singer Anthony da Costa performs there regularly, and Mary Lee Kortes, of the band Mary Lee's Corvette, has played there along with her husband, the guitarist and producer Eric Ambel. Postcrypt is one of the few free, all volunteer-run venues in New York. Its size is also notable: according to the fire code, it can legally only host 35 people at a time, giving the venue a very intimate feel, and making it possible to have music without any sort of amplification.\n

"}
Promotion Marketing Association, Inc. (Q7249874)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Promotion Marketing Association (PMA) is an advocacy group and trade association for the promotion and integrated marketing sector.\n

'}
Quaker Meeting-house (Q7268557)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Quaker Meeting-house on Hester and Elizabeth Streets, Manhattan, New York was a former meetinghouse for the Religious Society of Friends, built in 1818. Recorded in 1876 by the New York Express that it “has for a long time been the office of the New York Gas Light Company,” now Consolidated Edison. It was presumed demolished.

'}
The St. Regis Hotel (Q2322983)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Regis New York is a historic luxury hotel that opened in 1904. It is located at 2 East 55th Street in Manhattan, New York City, between Madison Avenue and Fifth Avenue. The hotel holds Forbes five-star and AAA five-diamond ratings.\n

'}
Percy Rivington Pyne House (Q7167544)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Percy R. Pyne House (also known as the Percy Rivington Pyne House and Percy & Maud H. Pyne House) is a neo-Federal townhouse at 680 Park Avenue, located at the corner of Park Avenue and 68th Street in Manhattan.\n

'}
Performing Garage (Q7168286)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Performing Garage is an Off-Off-Broadway theater in SoHo, New York City. Established in 1968, it is the permanent home of the experimental theater company originally named The Performance Group (under Richard Schechner) that morphed in 1980 into The Wooster Group (under Elizabeth LeCompte), and their primary performance venue.\n

'}
Philippine Center (Q7185000)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Philippine Center is an agency of the Philippine Government in New York City and San Francisco in the United States. The New York City structure houses the offices of the Philippine Mission to the United Nations, the Philippine Consulate General, the Philippine Department of Trade and Industry, and the Philippine Department of Tourism. The Philippine Center Management (PCMB) manages the building and its properties. It is committed to "nurture, promote, and propagate Philippine culture, encourage foreign tourists to visit the Philippines, expand foreign markets of Philippine products, and enhance the image of the Philippines."\n

'}
Plane Space (Q7201008)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Plane Space was a contemporary art gallery located in the Greenwich Village district of Manhattan. The gallery featured mixed media work by emerging to mid-career artists in the U.S. and abroad.\n

'}
Plato's Retreat (Q7202411)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Plato's Retreat was a swingers' club in Manhattan, New York City, United States, operating from 1977 until 1985 and catering to heterosexual couples and bisexual women.\n

"}
Pomander Walk (Q7227208)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pomander Walk is a cooperative apartment complex in Manhattan, New York City, located on the Upper West Side between Broadway and West End Avenue. The complex consists of 27 buildings. Four buildings face West 94th Street, and another seven face West 95th Street, including one with a return facade on West End Avenue. The "Walk" itself, consisting of two rows of eight buildings facing each other across a narrow courtyard, runs through the middle of the block between 94th and 95th, with a locked gate at each end. Each building originally had one apartment on each floor. In recent years, some buildings have been reconfigured to serve as single-family homes.\n

'}
Power Memorial Academy (Q7236369)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Power Memorial Academy (PMA) was an all-boys Catholic high school in New York City that operated from 1931 through 1984. It was a basketball powerhouse, producing several NBA players including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Len Elmore, Mario Elie, Chris Mullin, as well as NBA referee Dick Bavetta and a record 71-game winning streak. Its 1964 basketball team was named "The #1 High School Team of The Century".\n

'}
Prince Hall Masonic Temple (Q7244047)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Prince Hall Masonic Temple in Harlem, Manhattan in New York City, is a meeting place for Prince Hall freemasons.\n

'}
Princess Theatre (Q7244847)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Princess Theatre was a joint venture between the Shubert Brothers, producer Ray Comstock, theatrical agent Elisabeth Marbury and actor-director Holbrook Blinn. Built on a narrow slice of land located at 104–106 West 39th Street, just off Sixth Avenue in New York City, and seating just 299 people, it was one of the smallest Broadway theatres when it opened in early 1913. The architect was William A. Swasey, who designed the Winter Garden Theatre two years earlier.

'}
Provincetown Playhouse (Q7252605)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Provincetown Playhouse is a historic theatre at 133 MacDougal Street between West 3rd and West 4th Streets in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is named for the Provincetown Players, who converted the former stable and wine-bottling plant into a theater in 1918. The original Players included George Cram Cook, Susan Glaspell, Eugene O\'Neill, John Reed, Louise Bryant, Floyd Dell, Ida Rauh, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Djuna Barnes. Paul Robeson performed at the theatre, and E. E. Cummings had his play "Him" performed in the building. Ann Harding, Bette Davis, Claudette Colbert made their New York stage debuts in the facility.

'}
Philosophy Hall (Q7186216)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Philosophy Hall is a building on the campus of Columbia University in New York City. It houses the English, Philosophy, and French departments, along with the university's writing center, part of its registrar's office, and the student lounge of its Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. It is one of the original buildings designed for the university's Morningside Heights campus by McKim, Mead, and White, built in the Italian Renaissance Revival style and completed in 1910. Philosophy Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Historic Landmark as the site of the invention of FM radio by Edwin Armstrong in the early 1930s.\n

"}
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Q1950740)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) is a private graduate medical school in Manhattan, New York City. Chartered by Mount Sinai Hospital in 1963, it is the academic teaching arm of the Mount Sinai Health System, which manages eight hospital campuses in the New York metropolitan area. Ranking 18th in the country for biomedical research, it leads the country in neuroscience research funding from the National Institutes of Health (#1), receiving $31.2 million in 2018. It attracted $348.5 million in total NIH funding in 2018.

'}
New York Mini 10K (Q1983094)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Mini 10K is an annual 10-kilometer road running competition for women that takes place in Central Park, New York City, in the United States. The race has been organised by New York Road Runners since 1972. The competition has both an elite-level race and a fun run, both of which accounted for a total of 5189 finishers in 2010.

'}
Minetta Creek (Q6864566)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Minetta Creek was one of the largest natural watercourses in Manhattan, New York City, United States. Minetta Creek was fed from two tributaries, one originating at Fifth Avenue and 21st Street, and the other originating at Sixth Avenue and 16th Street. They joined near Fifth Avenue and 11th Street then took a southwesterly course. Minetta Creek\'s name is thought to have originated from either the Native American term "Manette", meaning "Devil\'s Water", or the Dutch word "Minnetje", meaning "the little one".\n

'}
Mott Street (Q6918632)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mott Street (Chinese: 勿街; Jyutping: Mat6gaai1) is a narrow but busy thoroughfare that runs in a north–south direction in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is regarded as Chinatown\'s unofficial "Main Street". Mott Street runs from Bleecker Street in the north to Chatham Square in the south. It is a one-way street with southbound-running vehicular traffic only.\n

'}
Moving Picture Institute (Q6927081)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Moving Picture Institute (MPI) is an American non-profit organization and film production company founded in 2005 by human rights advocate Thor Halvorssen. Its current president is Rob Pfaltzgraff.\n

'}
NBA Store (Q6952699)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The NBA Store is a chain of officially licensed retailers which sell merchandise for the National Basketball Association (NBA). The most prominent of these stores is located in the United States on Fifth Avenue and 45th Street, Manhattan, New York. There are seven other locations outside the United States: one in Milan, Italy, two in Beijing, China, one in Taipei, Taiwan, and three in the Metro Manila; the newest store in Cebu City, Philippines.\n

'}
National Audubon Society v. Superior Court (Q6970831)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

National Audubon Society v. Superior Court (Supreme Court of California, 1983, 33 Cal.3d 419) was a key case in California highlighting the conflict between the public trust doctrine and appropriative water rights. The Public Trust Doctrine is based on the principle that certain resources (such as navigable waters) are too valuable to be privately owned and must remain available for public use. In National Audubon Society v. Superior Court, the court held that the public trust doctrine restricts the amount of water that can be withdrawn from navigable waterways. The basis for the Public Trust Doctrine goes back to Roman law. Under Roman law, the air, the rivers, the sea and the seashore were incapable of private ownership; they were dedicated to the use of the public. In essence, the public trust doctrine establishes the role of the state as having trustee environmental duties owed to the public that are subsequently enforceable by the public. There is judicial recognition of this, dictating that certain rights of the public are key to individual common law rights (such as state recognition of the public right or trust for waterways and coastal zones). Judicial recognition of the public trust doctrine has been established for tidelands and non-navigable waterways, submerged land (such as lake beds) and the waters above them, and preservation of a public interest (such as recreation, swimming, access, and sport fishing).

'}
National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership (Q6973872)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership (CLAL) is a leadership training institute, think tank, and resource center. It is an inter-disciplinary and inter-denominational movement, in which rabbis from all of the major Jewish denominations in North America are participants. The organization is described by The Jewish Daily Forward as a "think-tank dedicated to questions of Jewish identity and religious practice...in its quest to expand the boundaries of Jewish communal life".

'}
Polish Veterans of World War II (United States) (Q15980160)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Polish Combatants' Association (pl. Stowarzyszenie Polskich Kombatantów w Stanach Zjednoczonych, SPK), organized in 1952, formally founded a year later, and terminated in 2012, was a Polish-American association for veterans of the Polish Armed Forces in the West during World War II. It was a member of the World Federation of Polish Combatants Association, an umbrella organization that included similar associations from other countries. The Association's President Janusz Krzyżanowski currently serves as the chairman of its liquidation committee, working to create a scholarly source of information about the SPK.\n

"}
Bonds International Casino (Q16255127)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bond International Casino (sometimes called "Bond\'s") was a nightclub and music venue located on the east side of Broadway between 44th and 45th Streets near Times Square, New York City.\n

'}
45 Broad Street (Q1967780)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

45 Broad Street is a 68-story, 1,115-foot (340-meter) supertall residential skyscraper being constructed in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The building will become Lower Manhattan's tallest residential tower. Excavation started in 2017, but as of 2020, construction is on hold.\n

"}
Phillips Beth Israel School of Nursing (Q7185877)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Phillips School of Nursing at Mount Sinai Beth Israel (PSON) is the school of nursing at the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City.\n

'}
The School at Columbia University (Q7762527)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The School at Columbia University is a private K-8 school affiliated with Columbia University. Students are drawn equally from the Morningside Heights, Manhattan/Upper West Side/Harlem community and from the faculty and staff of the university. Currently there are three divisions: Primary (K-2), Intermediate (3-5) and Middle (6-8). Each division has its own Division Head and there is one Head of School. It is located at 110th Street and Broadway in the New York City borough of Manhattan.\n

'}
Mitchell Square Park (Q6881404)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mitchel Square Park is a small urban park in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is a two part, triangle shaped park formed by the intersection of Saint Nicholas Avenue, Broadway and 167th Street.\n

'}
220 Central Park South (Q15781036)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

220 Central Park South is a residential skyscraper along Central Park South in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, designed by the firm Robert A.M. Stern Architects with interiors by Thierry Despont. The tower has 70 floors and 116 units. The tower is the 17th tallest building in New York City, and neighbors the Central Park Tower, which will be the second tallest building in the city upon completion.

'}
A&P Warehouse (Q16821050)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (A&P) Warehouse, located at 67 Vestry Street, is a historic building in the Tribeca section of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Originally a storage building, it was later converted to residential use and has since been historically linked to the New York City arts scene.

'}
1934 NFL Championship Game (Q1960120)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1934 National Football League Championship Game, also known as the Sneakers Game, was the second scheduled National Football League (NFL) championship game. Played at the Polo Grounds in New York City on December 9, it was the first title game for the newly created Ed Thorp Memorial Trophy. With a remarkable fourth quarter, the New York Giants defeated the Chicago Bears 30–13.

'}
2010 Times Square car bombing attempt (Q1973105)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On May 1, 2010, a terrorist attack was attempted in Times Square in Manhattan, New York. Two street vendors alerted NYPD after they spotted smoke coming from a vehicle, and a car bomb was discovered. The bomb had been ignited, but failed to explode, and was disarmed before it caused any casualties. Two days later, federal agents arrested Faisal Shahzad, a 30-year-old Pakistan-born resident of Bridgeport, Connecticut, who had become a U.S. citizen in April 2009. He was arrested after he had boarded Emirates Flight 202 to Dubai at John F. Kennedy International Airport. He admitted attempting the car bombing and said that he had trained at a Pakistani terrorist training camp, according to U.S. officials.

'}
2014 East Harlem gas explosion (Q15930212)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 2014 East Harlem gas explosion occurred at 9:31\xa0a.m. on March 12, 2014, in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The explosion leveled two apartment buildings located just north of 116th Street at 1644 and 1646 Park Avenue, killing eight people, injuring at least 70 others, and displacing 100 families. City officials initially pointed to a gas leak as the cause of the blast. In June 2015, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) blamed the explosion on failures by Consolidated Edison and the city.

'}
1944 NFL Championship Game (Q16202444)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1944 National Football League Championship Game was the 12th National Football League (NFL) title game. The game was played on December 17 at the Polo Grounds in New York City, and the attendance was 46,016. The game featured the Green Bay Packers (8–2), champions of the Western Division versus the Eastern Division champion New York Giants (8–1–1).

'}
Old Grapevine (Q16238124)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Grapevine was a tavern in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City at the corner of Sixth Avenue and 11th Street. The tavern was located in a three-story roadhouse built in the 18th century and was originally called the Hawthorne. It was later named after a grapevine that grew on one of its walls. It was a hangout for artists, actors, businessmen, lawyers, Confederate spies, and Union officers. The high concentration of Civil War Soldiers made it an ideal place to hear (or plant) military gossip, leading some to believe the phrase "heard it through the grapevine" originated here.

'}
Sawyer Memorial Universalist Church (Q16258341)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sawyer Memorial Universalist Church was a historic church in Harlem, New York.

'}
Tribute in Light (Q2001578)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Tribute in Light is an art installation of 88 vertical searchlights placed six blocks south of the World Trade Center on top of the Battery Parking Garage in New York City which create two columns of light to represent the Twin Towers in remembrance of the September 11 attacks. Tribute in Light began initially as a temporary commemoration of the attacks in early 2002 but became an annual commemoration, currently produced on September 11 by the Municipal Art Society of New York.

'}
Bignou Gallery (Q15619234)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bignou Gallery was a New York City gallery located in Midtown Manhattan. It was a branch of the Bignou Gallery in Paris. The Bignou Gallery exhibited works by major European and American artists including Paul Gauguin, Georges Gimel, Henri Matisse, Jean Lurçat, and Amedeo Modigliani.

'}
Duffy's Hill (Q16209891)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Duffy\'s Hill is a hill located on Lexington Avenue between 102nd and 103rd Streets in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was named for Michael James Duffy, a Tammany Hall Alderman who spent $250,000 to build 26 rowhouses on the south side of 101st Street between Lexington and Park Avenues in 1894. He continued building between Third Avenue and Lexington Avenue up to 104th Street, a section of the city sometimes known at the time as "Duffyville".

'}
Nick's (Q16238096)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Nick's (Nick's Tavern) is a tavern and jazz club located at the northwest corner of 10th Street and 7th Avenue in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan, New York City, which was at its peak in the 1940s and 1950s.\n

"}
San Remo Cafe (Q16238285)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The San Remo Cafe was a bar at 93 MacDougal Street at the corner of Bleecker Street in the New York City neighborhood of Greenwich Village. It was a hangout for Bohemians and writers such as James Agee, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Miles Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Billy Name, Frank O'Hara, Jack Kerouac, Jackson Pollock, William Styron, Dylan Thomas, Gore Vidal, Judith Malina and many others. It opened in 1925 closed in 1967.

"}
The Market NYC (Q16238444)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Market NYC is a designer and vintage goods flea market with outlets in several location in New York City. The market has two locations: one at 290 Mulberry Street in Nolita, Manhattan and another at 218 Bedford Avenue in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn.

'}
Braddock Hotel (Q16255373)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Braddock Hotel was a hotel at the corner of 126th Street and 8th Avenue in New York City, near the Apollo Theater. The hotel bar was popular with black jazz musicians, and Dizzy Gillespie, Billy Eckstine, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Dinah Washington performed here. Before he joined the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X (then known as Malcolm Little) often spent time at the hotel's bar.

"}
Giuseppe Garibaldi (Q16579812)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

An outdoor bronze sculpture of Giuseppe Garibaldi, one of the leaders of Italian unification, is installed in Washington Square Park in Manhattan, New York.\n

'}
Squadron A Armory (Q7581904)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Squadron A Armory is a former United States Army armory and was the home base of Squadron A. It took up the whole block between Madison Avenue and Park Avenue, between 94th and 95th Street. It was therefore also known as the Madison Avenue Armory. A surviving part of the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Madison Avenue Facade of the Squadron A Armory and is a New York City landmark.\n

'}
St. Ann's Church (Q7586960)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Ann’s Church was the name of a former Roman Catholic parish church at 110-120 East 12th Street between Fourth and Third Avenues in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
St. Elizabeth's Church (Q7587835)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Church of St. Elizabeth is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at West 187th Street at Wadsworth Avenue in Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City. The parish was established in 1869, originally located on 187th Street at Broadway from 1869 to 1929.

'}
St. Emeric's Church (Q7587879)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Church of St. Emeric was a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at Avenue D, between 12th Street and 13th Street, Manhattan, New York City. The address is 740 East 13th Street. When restoration was completed on St. Brigid's on Avenue B in 2013, the Church of St. Emeric was closed and the parishes merged to form the parish of St. Brigid-St. Emeric.

"}
St. Jean Baptiste High School (Q7588535)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Jean Baptiste High School is an all-female, private, Roman Catholic high school located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is administered by the Congregation of Notre Dame of Montreal and located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.

'}
Grand Central Palace (Q14706295)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grand Central Palace was an exhibition hall in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The name refers to two structures, both located on Lexington Avenue near Grand Central Terminal.\n

'}
St. Mark the Evangelist's Church (Q7589991)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Mark the Evangelist is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at West 138th Street, near Lenox Avenue in northern Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The address is 59-61 West 138th Street and 195 East Lenox Avenue. The parish was established in 1907 and has been staffed by the Holy Ghost Fathers since 1912. The Rev. Charles J. Plunkett, pastor, had a brick church built in 1914 to designs by Nicholas Serracino of 1170 Broadway for $12,000.

'}
St. Mary Magdalen's Church (Q7590496)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of St. Mary Magdalen is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, in Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
133rd Street (Q16149970)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

133rd Street is a street in Manhattan and the Bronx, New York City. In Harlem, Manhattan, it begins at Riverside Drive on its western side and crosses Broadway, Amsterdam Avenue, and ends at Convent Avenue, before resuming on the eastern side, crossing Seventh Avenue, and ending at Lenox Avenue. In Port Morris in the Bronx, it runs from Bruckner Boulevard/St. Ann\'s Place to Locust Avenue. The block between Seventh Avenue and Lenox Avenues was once a thriving night spot, known as "Swing Street", with numerous cabarets, jazz clubs, and speakeasies. The street is described in modern times as "a quiet stretch of brownstones and tenement-style apartment houses, the kind of block that typifies this section of central Harlem".

'}
Bernard Museum of Judaica (Q16254382)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Bernard Museum of Judaica, formally the Herbert & Eileen Bernard Museum of Judaica is part of Temple Emanu-El on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The museum consists of three galleries. The first two galleries are often used for temporary exhibitions. The third gallery is the permanent collection which contains items of Judaica and Temple memorabilia. Some of the museum's more than 1,000 objects date back to the 14th century. Not limited to items from Emanu-El's history, the collection also includes items from the histories of Temple Emanu-El, Temple Beth-El (merged with Temple Emanu-el in 1927), Ansche Chesed and Adas Jeshurun who merged to form Beth-El in 1974.

"}
Masonic Hall (Q16237969)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Masonic Hall in New York City is the headquarters of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York. The building was constructed to replace a previous Masonic Hall (built in 1875 and designed by Napoleon LeBrun), that stood on the same site.\n

'}
The World Trade Center Tapestry (Q16726206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The World Trade Center Tapestry was a large tapestry by Joan Miró and Josep Royo. It was displayed in the lobby of 2 World Trade Center (the South Tower) in New York City from 1974 until it was destroyed in 2001 by the collapse of the World Trade Center.\n

'}
New York Crystal Palace (Q1983045)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Crystal Palace was an exhibition building constructed for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in New York City in 1853, which was under the presidency of the mayor Jacob Aaron Westervelt. The building stood in Reservoir Square.\n

'}
St. James Elementary School (Q7588465)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St. James School was a Catholic elementary school located at 37 St. James Place in New York City across James Street from St. James' Church (New York City). It is located in Lower Manhattan, in close proximity to Chinatown, One Police Plaza, the Brooklyn Bridge and City Hall.\n

"}
Thomas J. Watson Library (Q15961559)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Thomas J. Watson Library is the main research library of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA), and supports the research activities of the museum staff, as well as outside researchers.\n

'}
C24 Gallery (Q16256012)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nC24 Gallery is a contemporary art gallery founded in 2011 by Emre & Maide Kurttepeli, Mel Dogan and located in Chelsea, New York City that focuses on presenting exhibitions from both local and international artists. In addition to an ambitious exhibition program, which includes collaborations with renowned curators, C24 Gallery regularly hosts artist talks and lectures, and produces catalogues and artist books. Each year the gallery participates in major art fairs all around the world.\n

'}
Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery (Q16334452)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery is an art gallery in New York City that was involved in the New York art market of the 1980s and 1990s.\n

'}
Anna Wintour Costume Center (Q16729216)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Anna Wintour Costume Center is a wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art that houses the collection of the Costume Institute. The center is named after Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief of Vogue, artistic director of Condé Nast, and chair of the museum\'s annual Met Gala (often called the "Met Ball") since 1995. It was endowed by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch. As of August 2017, the curator is Andrew Bolton.

'}
Printed Matter, Inc (Q15619211)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Printed Matter, Inc. is an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit grant-supported bookstore, artist organization, and arts space which publishes and distributes artists' books. It is currently located at 231 11th Avenue in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City. \n

"}
Léman Manhattan Preparatory School (Q6710972)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Léman Manhattan Preparatory School is a private school located in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The school serves students from early childhood (age 16 months) through 12th grade at two campuses in Lower Manhattan. Founded as Claremont Preparatory School in 2005, it was renamed in 2011.

'}
Loyola School (Q6694600)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Loyola School is an independent Jesuit high school on the Upper East Side of New York City, founded in 1900 by the Society of Jesus. Originally a Roman Catholic boys school, Loyola became coeducational in 1973, becoming the only Jesuit co-ed college preparatory high school in the Tri-State Region. With a student enrollment of two hundred, the average class size of fifteen students promotes personal attention and individual participation. Loyola education fosters lifelong learning and aims to produce graduates who are academically excellent, open to growth, religious, loving, and committed to doing justice in service to others. The school is located two city blocks east of Central Park and Museum Mile on 83rd Street and Park Avenue in Manhattan. St. Ignatius Church is in the same complex and is used for various school functions. The church is listed as a NYC landmark and the complex is listed as a National Historic Place. St. Ignatius Loyola School is an elementary school that also shares the complex but there is no official link between the schools.\n

'}
Luxor Hotel (Q6706426)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Luxor Hotel in New York City was built by the D.P.R. Construction Company and opened in February 1925. The establishment is located at 121-127 West 46th Street in Manhattan. Built for $1,250,000, the structure has eighty-four guest rooms with a large bath establishment. The baths operated in connection with the hotel dormitories.

'}
Lyceum Theatre (Q6707253)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lyceum Theatre was a theatre in New York City located on Fourth Avenue, now Park Avenue South, between 23rd and 24th Streets in Manhattan. It was built in 1885 and operated until 1902, when it was torn down to make way for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower. It was replaced by a new Lyceum Theatre on 45th Street. For most of its existence, the theatre was home to Daniel Frohman’s Lyceum Theatre Stock Company, which presented many important plays and actors of the day.\n

'}
MacDougal Street (Q6721850)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

MacDougal Street is a one-way street in the Greenwich Village and SoHo neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City. The street is bounded on the south by Prince Street and on the north by West 8th Street; its numbering begins in the south. Between Waverly Place and West 3rd Street it carries the name Washington Square West and the numbering scheme changes, running north to south, beginning with #29 Washington Square West at Waverly Place and ending at #37 at West 3rd Street. Traffic on the street runs southbound (downtown).\n

'}
Madison Square Garden (Q6728098)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Madison Square Garden (MSG III) was an indoor arena in New York City, the third bearing that name. It was built in 1925 and closed in 1968, and was located on the west side of Eighth Avenue between 49th and 50th Streets in Manhattan, on the site of the city's trolley-car barns. It was the first Garden that was not located near Madison Square. MSG III was the home of the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League and the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association, and also hosted numerous boxing matches, the Millrose Games, concerts, and other events.\n

"}
Madison Square North Historic District (Q6728100)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Madison Square North Historic District is in Manhattan, New York City, and was created on June 26, 2001 by the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission.

"}
Madison Square Theatre (Q6728106)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Madison Square Theatre was a Broadway theatre in Manhattan, on the south side of 24th Street between Sixth Avenue and Broadway (which intersects Fifth Avenue near that point.) It was built in 1863, operated as a theater from 1865 to 1908, and demolished in 1908 to make way for an office building. The Madison Square Theatre was the scene of important developments in stage technology, theatre design, and theatrical tour management. For about half its history it had other names including the Fifth Avenue Theatre, Daly’s Fifth Avenue Theatre, Hoyt’s Madison Square Theatre, and Hoyt’s Theatre.\n

'}
MLB Fan Cave (Q6716538)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The MLB Fan Cave was a building on 4th Street and Broadway in New York, designed by Paul DiMeo, where baseball fans, selected by Major League Baseball as part of its Dreamjob program, were tasked with watching every baseball game in the entire year. According to Major League Baseball,

'}
Manhattan Avenue (Q6749229)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Avenue may refer to:

'}
Ludlow Street Jail (Q6698871)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Ludlow Street Jail was New York City's Federal prison, located on Ludlow Street and Broome Street in Manhattan. Some prisoners, such as soldiers, were held there temporarily awaiting extradition to other jurisdictions, but most of the inmates were debtors imprisoned by their creditors. Seward Park Campus now sits on the site of the jail.

"}
Luna Lounge (Q6703534)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Luna Lounge was a bar at 171 Ludlow Street, on the west side of Ludlow Street on Manhattan\'s Lower East Side. Opened in 1995 by Dianne Galliano and Robert Sacher, it was a popular venue for local bands and stand-up comics (the rock band Interpol played there early on and last returned in 2003 to perform a secret show under the name "Cuddleworthy"). A much-loved foosball table was located by the entrance; a game cost $1 in quarters. \n

'}
Lusardi's (Q6705024)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lusardi's is a Northern Italian restaurant located at 1494 Second Avenue (between East 77th and East 78th Streets) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, in New York City.\n

"}
Madison Square Presbyterian Church, New York City (Q6728103)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Madison Square Presbyterian Church was a Presbyterian church in Manhattan, New York City, located on Madison Square Park at the southeast corner of East 24th Street and Madison Avenue. Construction on the church began in 1853 and was completed in 1854. It was designed by Richard M. Upjohn, the son of noted architect Richard Upjohn, in the Gothic Revival architectural style. The congregation's original building was acquired by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company and was demolished in 1909 to make way for the 48-story Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower. In exchange, the church received a 75 feet (23\xa0m) by 150 feet (46\xa0m) plot of land across 24th Street that became the site for Stanford White's Madison Square Presbyterian Church.\n

"}
Manhattan Avenue-West 120th-123rd Streets Historic District (Q6749230)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Avenue–West 120th–123rd Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem in New York City. It consists of 113 contributing residential rowhouses built between 1886 and 1896. The buildings are three story brownstone and brick rowhouses over raised basements in the Queen Anne, Romanesque, and Neo-Grec styles.

'}
United States Post Office Madison Square Station (Q6728105)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The United States Post Office Madison Square Station is a historic post office building located at 149 East 23rd Street between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City. In spite of the building's name, it is not located on Madison Square but about five blocks east (approximately 1/4 mile) along 23rd Street. The building runs through the block to East 24th Street, where there are loading docks and another much smaller and less formal public entrance.\n

"}
Livingston Library (Q6659659)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Livingston Library in New York City is one of relatively few large libraries of Freemasonry materials.\n

'}
MSR Studios (Q6717894)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

MSR Studios was a photography and movie producing company recording facility in New York City. MSR Studios was located just outside Times Square at 168 West 48th street, between 6th and 7th avenues. Originating from the merger of Sound on Sound and Right Track Recording, the studio was first known as Legacy Studios.\n

'}
National Committee on American Foreign Policy (Q14707049)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Committee on American Foreign Policy (NCAFP) is an American nonprofit, nonpartisan activist organization dedicated to the resolution of conflicts that threaten United States interests.\n

'}
New York City Lab School for Collaborative Studies (Q14707075)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York City Lab School for Collaborative Studies is a secondary school in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It serves students in grades 6–12 and was described as one of the best schools in Manhattan in 2010 by the New York Post and CUNY. The school is a part of the New York City Department of Education.\n

'}
Old Christ Church Lutheran (New York City) (Q14707133)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Old Christ Church Lutheran (Old Hollandaise Lutheran Church) was a former Lutheran congregation in North America, located in Washington Heights in Manhattan, New York City, founded in 1750 after breaking off from Trinity Lutheran Church. The two congregations reunited in 1784 as The United German Lutheran Churches in New York City, but still referred to as Christ and old Trinity. The two united congregations began sharing the St. Matthew's Church structure in 1822 while keeping separate names. This continued until the name ceased in 1838 and the congregation was just called the Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Matthew. The present New York Lutheran church of the same name, Christ Church was founded much later after the Old Christ Church name was no longer used.\n

"}
Lower East Side I Infill (Q6693463)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lower East Side I Infill, or Lower East Side Infill #1, is a public housing development built and maintained by the New York City Housing Authority on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

'}
LowLine (Q6692796)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Lowline, formerly known as the Delancey Underground, was a park under construction that would have been the world's first underground park in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It was located under the eastbound roadway of Delancey Street on the Lower East Side, in the former Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal adjacent to the Essex Street station (J, M, and Z\u200b trains). \n

"}
George J. Gould House (Q14706283)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The George Gould House was a mansion located at 857 Fifth Avenue on the northeast corner of 67th Street in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was designed by architect Horace Trumbauer of Philadelphia and constructed in 1906 for George Jay Gould I in the French style, replacing the earlier Jay Gould House. Gould's house was designed both to complement and outshine the existing Isaac Stern House that had been erected next door, at 858 Fifth Avenue: under cornices of the same height the Gould house comprised but three floors to the Stern house's modestly-scaled four.\n

"}
Henry Phipps House (Q14706345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Henry Phipps House was a mansion located on 1063 Fifth Avenue in the Upper East Side in Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
MacDougall Hospital (Q14706857)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

MacDougall Hospital was a U.S. Army military hospital located at Fort Schuyler in New York City before and during the American Civil War.\n

'}
Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse (Q14706946)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse was an 11-story structure built on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, in 1925. It fronted seventy-four feet on Amsterdam Avenue between 82nd Avenue and 83rd Street. Continuing in its rear for one hundred feet, the edifice possessed an L fronting twenty-five feet on West 83rd Street. Aside from warehouse space, the Metropolitan Fireproof Warehouse contained exhibit, sales rooms, and other facilities.

'}
Special Music School (Q14707317)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Special Music School (SMS, PS 859) is a K-12 public school that teaches music as a core subject on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The school is run as a public/private partnership between the New York City Department of Education and Kaufman Music Center, a not-for-profit, multi-arts organization. The Department of Education funds the academic portion of the students' education, while the music program is funded by private donations through Kaufman Music Center.

"}
Lubin School of Business (Q6695324)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Joseph I. Lubin School of Business is the business school of Pace University. The school was established in 1906 as the Pace School of Accountancy to prepare men and women for the CPA exam, and was named after Joseph I. Lubin, an alumnus and benefactor of the school, in 1981. The school is located at Pace University's campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York.\n

"}
Maccarone Inc (Q6722886)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nMaccarone is a contemporary art gallery in the West Village neighborhood of New York City.

'}
Madison Street (Q6728110)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Madison Street is a two-way thoroughfare in the Lower East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan that begins under the Brooklyn Bridge entrance ramp and ends at Grand Street. It is roughly sixteen large city blocks long. Due to security measures implemented after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, public access to the part of the street before St. James Place is restricted. The character of Madison Street changes from block to block. There are housing projects east of Pike Street. Between Catherine Street and Pike Street the street is residential, dominated by mostly tenements. The street is considered one of the southern boundaries of Chinatown.

'}
Casa 74 (Q14706213)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Casa 74, also known as 255 East 74th Street, is a 30-story, 87-apartment condominium building. It is situated at the corner of Second Avenue and East 74th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Pike's Opera House (Q14707189)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pike\'s Opera House, later renamed the Grand Opera House, was a theater in New York City on the northwest corner of 8th Avenue and 23rd Street, in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan. It was constructed in 1868, at a cost of a million dollars (equivalent to about 19.2\xa0million US dollars in 2019), for distiller and entrepreneur Samuel N. Pike (1822–1872) of Cincinnati. The building survived in altered form until 1960 as an RKO movie theater, after which it was replaced by part of Penn South, an urban renewal housing development.:599

'}
Harlem Academy (Q14706313)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Not to be confused with Harlem Academy School in Tampa, Florida\n

'}
Hunter College Elementary School (Q14706474)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hunter College Elementary School is a New York City elementary school for select students who reside in New York City, located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Administered by Hunter College, a senior college of the City University of New York or CUNY, it is claimed that admission standards are higher than Ivy League colleges.

"}
Invisible-Exports (Q14706539)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Invisible-Exports is a contemporary art gallery located in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York. It is co-owned and directed by Risa Needleman and Benjamin Tischer and recognized for housing provocative and controversial exhibitions. The gallery represents a small roster of influential avant-garde artists, including iconic artist Genesis P-Orridge. The gallery is part of a network of galleries in the LES, referred to as a "gallery district."\n

'}
Le Petit Senegal (Q14706778)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Le Petit Sénégal, or Little Senegal, is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It has been called Le Petit Senegal by the West African immigrant community and Little Senegal by some people from outside the neighborhood.\n

'}
Sloane House YMCA (Q14707305)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Sloane House YMCA, also known as William Sloane House YMCA, at 356 West 34th Street in Manhattan was the largest residential YMCA building in the nation.

'}
Little Fuzhou (Q6650120)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Little Fuzhou (Chinese: 小福州; pinyin: Xiǎo Fúzhōu; Foochow Romanized: Siēu-hók-ciŭ), or Fuzhou Town (Chinese: 福州埠; pinyin: Fúzhōu Bù; Foochow Romanized: Hók-ciŭ-pú), is a neighborhood in the Two Bridges and Lower East Side areas of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Starting in the 1980s and especially in the 1990s, the neighborhood became a prime destination for immigrants from Fuzhou, Fujian, China. Manhattan\'s Little Fuzhou is centered on East Broadway. However, since the 2000s, Chinatown in the neighborhood of Sunset Park became New York City\'s new primary destination for the Fuzhou immigrants, surpassing the original enclave in Manhattan.

'}
Lloyd Sealy Library (Q6662727)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lloyd George Sealy Library is the campus library at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York (CUNY). Located in Haaren Hall, the library specializes in criminal justice-related materials.\n

'}
BravinLee programs (Q14706196)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

BravinLee programs is a contemporary art gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City. The gallery's programs support the exhibition of works on paper, artist books, public art projects, and artist-designed hand-knotted rugs.\n

"}
Gunther Building (Q14706305)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gunther Building was a seven-story commercial edifice in Manhattan located at 391 - 393 Fifth Avenue, between 36th Street and 37th Street. It occupied a plot 41.8 feet (12.7\xa0m) on Fifth Avenue by 111.8 feet (34.1\xa0m) in depth. Built in 1909, the establishment conformed in architecture, appointments,\nand construction with the Tiffany and Company Building, which adjoined it. The latter structure was designed by Stanford White and was constructed by Tiffany & Company in 1903,\nat the corner of the block on 37th Street.

'}
Harold Pratt House (Q14706316)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Harold Pratt House is a mansion located on 58 East 68th Street and Park Avenue in the Upper East Side of New York City. It serves as headquarters for the Council on Foreign Relations. \nThe house was constructed for Harold I. Pratt in the years 1919–1920. The Council on Foreign Relations moved to Pratt House in April 1945 after it was donated to the CFR by his widow Harriet Barnes Pratt the previous year.\nThe house is available for receptions and other functions.

'}
Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature (Q14706350)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature, a special collection within the New York Public Library, is one of the major collection of rare books, first editions, and manuscripts in English and American literature. It was donated by Albert Berg and his brother Henry and formally endowed in 1941.

'}
Mars 2112 (Q14706909)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mars 2112 (pronounced "Mars twenty-one twelve") was one of many tourist-targeted restaurants in the Times Square district of New York City, based on future space travel and accommodations. At 33,000\xa0sq\xa0ft (3,100\xa0m2), it was the largest such themed restaurant when it opened in November 1998. \nBusinessmen and founders Paschal M. Phelan and Simon Deith claimed at its opening, "It\'s the fusion of fun and good food and fantasy."

'}
Our Lady of Vilnius Church (New York City) (Q14707148)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Our Lady of Vilnius Church was a Roman Catholic parish church located at 568-570 Broome Street, in Hudson Square, Manhattan, New York City, east of the entrance to the Holland Tunnel but predating it. It was built in 1910 as the national parish church of the Lithuanian Catholic community. Despite a landmarks preservation debate, the church was demolished in May 2015.\n

'}
Government House (Q14706294)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Government House was a mansion at the foot of Broadway, south of Bowling Green, on the site previously occupied by Fort George in Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1790 by the state of New York, it was intended to be the executive mansion for President George Washington, but he never occupied it. Before it was completed, the federal government moved temporarily to Philadelphia; then permanently to Washington, D.C. It then became the state governor’s residence and was used by George Clinton and John Jay. Later it was leased to John Avery and was known as the Elysian Boarding House. After the passage of the Customs Administration Act in 1799, it was converted into the Custom House in New York. Parts of the building were later leased to the American Academy of Arts, who then offered space to the New-York Historical Society in 1809. In 1813, the property was sold to the city. In 1815, the land was sold to the public and the building demolished.\n

'}
Baudouine Building (Q16839169)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Baudouine Building is a historic building located at 1181-1183 Broadway at the corner of West 28th Street in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built from 1895-96 as an office tower with street level store, replacing a hotel that had previously stood on the site, and was designed by Alfred Zucker in the Classical Revival style.\n

'}
Fez (Q16838258)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Fez under Time Cafe, known as the Fez, was a nightclub and restaurant on Lafayette Street and Great Jones Street in New York City's NoHo District. The club closed in February 2005. It hosted numerous musicians and comedians, including Rufus Wainwright, Stella, Richard Barone, Carly Simon and Jeff Buckley.

"}
The Cable Building (Q16901520)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cable Building is located at 611 Broadway at the northwest corner with Houston Street in NoHo and Greenwich Village, in Manhattan, New York City. Since it spans a block, the Cable Building also has addresses of 2-18 West Houston Street and 178-188 Mercer Street.\n

'}
Muscota Marsh (Q16895552)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Muscota Marsh is a one-acre public park in the Inwood section of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, on the shore of Spuyten Duyvil Creek, a section of the Harlem River. It is adjacent to the much larger Inwood Hill Park and Columbia University's Baker Athletics Complex. The park is notable for its views and for its ecological conservation features.

"}
Medicare Rights Center (Q16933026)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Medicare Rights Center (Medicare Rights) was founded in June 1989 as the Medicare Beneficiaries Defense Fund (MBDF) by Diane Archer. One of the first actions of the fledgling organization involved a lawsuit brought against the federal government on the grounds that the Medicare Explanation of Benefits (EOB) failed to mention limits on what a doctor may charge for a service or what a beneficiary must pay. The judge in the lawsuit noted that the EOB is "gobbledygook." This same year, the National Consumer Helpline was born, run by one staff member (MBDF founder, Diane Archer) and one volunteer. \n

'}
1928 Times Square derailment (Q16970981)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

During the evening rush hour on August 24, 1928, an express subway train derailed immediately after leaving the Times Square station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line. Sixteen people were killed at the scene, two died later, and about 100 were injured. It remains the second-deadliest accident on the New York City Subway system, after the Malbone Street Wreck.\n

'}
Arcadia Contemporary (Q16961855)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Arcadia Contemporary is a contemporary art gallery in Los Angeles.\n

'}
DODGEgallery (Q16962125)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

DODGEgallery was an American contemporary art gallery on the Lower East Side of New York City. It was established in 2010 and closed in 2014.

'}
Stux Gallery (Q16985117)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Stux Gallery is a contemporary fine art dealership located on 520 West End Avenue in New York on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Artists represented/exhibited by the gallery have included Doug and Mike Starn, Vik Muniz, Andres Serrano, Dennis Oppenheim, Elaine Sturtevant, Inka Essenhigh, and Orlan.\n

'}
Netherland-America Foundation (Q2112673)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Netherland-America Foundation also known as ”the NAF” is an American 501(c)(3), non-profit organization based in New York City with eight NAF Chapters in the United States and one NAF Chapter in the Netherlands. The mission of the Foundation is the support of exchange between the countries in education, performing and visual arts, sciences, business, and public policy. \n

'}
New York Feminist Art Institute (Q16864464)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Feminist Art Institute (NYFAI) was founded in 1979 (to 1990) by women artists, educators and professionals. NYFAI offered workshops and classes, held performances and exhibitions and special events that contributed to the political and cultural import of the women\'s movement at the time. The women\'s art school focused on self-development and discovery as well as art. Nancy Azara introduced "visual diaries" to artists to draw and paint images that arose from consciousness-raising classes and their personal lives. In the first half of the 1980s the school was named the Women\'s Center for Learning and it expanded its artistic and academic programs. Ceres Gallery was opened in 1985 after the school moved to TriBeCa and, like the school, it catered to women artists. NYFAI participated in protests to increase women\'s art shown at the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art and other museums. It held exhibitions and workshops and provided rental and studio space for women artists. Unable to secure sufficient funding to continue its operations, NYFAI closed in 1990. Ceres Gallery moved to SoHo and then to Chelsea and remained a gallery for women\'s art. However, a group continues to meet called (RE)PRESENT, a series of intergenerational dialogues at a NYC gallery to encourage discussion across generations about contemporary issues for women in the arts. It is open to all.\n

'}
1991 Union Square derailment (Q16972144)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 1991 Union Square derailment occurred shortly after midnight on August 28, 1991, a 4 Lexington Avenue Express train on the New York City Subway's IRT Lexington Avenue Line derailed as it was about to enter 14th Street–Union Square, killing five people. It was the worst accident on the subway system since the 1928 Times Square derailment. The motorman was found at fault for intoxication and excessive speed, and served time in prison for manslaughter.\n

"}
Creative Capital (Q16952589)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Creative Capital is a New York City-based national nonprofit that provides awards and advisory services to artists in 34 different disciplines, including visual art, performing arts, moving image and literature. Artists receive the Awards through an open application process.\n

'}
Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing (Q16892556)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing (HBSON) is the nursing school of Hunter College, a public university that is a constituent organization of the City University of New York (CUNY). It is located on the Brookdale Campus, at East 25th Street and 1st Avenue in Kips Bay, near Bellevue Hospital. The school is the flagship nursing program for CUNY.

'}
Innovation Diploma Plus High School (Q16892674)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Innovation Diploma Plus High School is located on 145 West 84th Street within the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It is also one of the four schools that are located in the Louis D. Brandeis High School Campus.

'}
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School (ballet) (Q16892782)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School at American Ballet Theatre (ABT/JKO School) is the associate school of American Ballet Theatre located at 890 Broadway, within the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City. The school comprises a children\'s division for ages 4 to 12, a pre-professional division for ages 12 to 18, and the preparatory program "Studio Company" for ages 16 to 20. It was established in 2004 and named in honor of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis who served on ABT\'s Board of Trustees as honorary chairman emerita for many years prior to her death. Besides its parent company, graduates of JKO have found employment in various companies, such as National Ballet of Canada, The Royal Ballet, Joffrey Ballet and Dutch National Ballet.

'}
Pleasant Avenue (Q16932984)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pleasant Avenue is a north-south street in the East Harlem neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It begins at E. 114th Street and ends at E. 120th Street. \nThe street was the northernmost section of Avenue A, which stretched from Alphabet City northward, and was added to the grid wherever space allowed between First Avenue and the East River. This stretch was renamed "Pleasant Avenue" in 1879. Unlike York Avenue, however, the addresses on Pleasant Avenue are not continuous with that on Avenue A (which would be in the 2000-series if they were continuous).\n

'}
The Colony (restaurant) (Q16901506)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
For the restaurant in London, see Colony (restaurant)

The Colony was a restaurant in New York City known as a meeting place of café society. It was founded in 1919 by Joseph L. Pani, who later sold it to an employee. It closed in 1971.\n

'}
Track 61 (Q16985712)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Track 61 is a storage track abutting a private railroad platform on the Metro-North Railroad in Manhattan, New York City. It is located beneath the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel, within an underground storage yard northeast of Grand Central Terminal. The platform is part of the Grand Central Terminal complex.\n

'}
Little Red School House (Q6651525)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School, also referred to as LREI, is a school in Manhattan, New York City. It was founded by Elisabeth Irwin in 1921 as the Little Red School House, and is regarded as the city's first progressive school. Created as a joint public-private educational experiment, the school tested principles of progressive education that had been advocated since the turn of the 20th century by John Dewey. The founders postulated that the lessons of progressive education could be applied successfully in the crowded, ethnically diverse public schools of the nation's largest city.\n

"}
Treadwell Farm Historic District (Q16901959)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Treadwell Farm Historic District is a small historic district located on parts of East 61st and East 62nd Street between Second and Third Avenues, in the Upper East Side neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City.\n

'}
100 Eleventh Avenue (Q16823802)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

100 Eleventh Avenue is a 23-story residential tower at the intersection of 19th Street and Eleventh Avenue (the West Side Highway) in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, New York. The building is described as "a vision machine" by the architect Jean Nouvel. It has one of the most technologically advanced curtain wall systems in New York City, but also refers to West Chelsea masonry industrial architectural traditions.

'}
Jefferson Market Prison (Q16892863)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The original jailhouse at this site was built alongside a police court and volunteer firehouse in the 1833 Jefferson food market, named for the former president. The jail was torn down in 1873.

'}
Yancey Richardson Gallery (Q16903953)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Founded in 1995, the Yancey Richardson Gallery is a dealer of fine art photography, based in New York City and founded by Yancey Richardson. Formerly housed in the 560 Broadway building in Soho, the gallery moved to New York's Chelsea art district (525 W 22nd) in 2000.

"}
Delegation of the European Union to the United Nations (Q16968907)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Delegation of the European Union to the United Nations represents the European Union in the United Nations, working in coordination with the diplomatic and consular missions of all the EU Member States.

'}
Friends of Oaxacan Folk Art (Q16993833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Friends of Oaxacan Folk Art is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the traditional handcrafts and folk art of the Mexican state of Oaxaca, especially to encourage young artisans to continue family and regional traditions.

'}
Russian Orthodox Church in the USA (Q2072813)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Russian Orthodox Church in the USA is the name of the group of parishes of the Russian Orthodox Church in America that are under the canonical authority of the Patriarch of Moscow. They were previously known as the Russian Exarchate of North America before autocephaly was granted to the Orthodox Church in America (OCA) in 1970. \n

'}
Electric Circus (Q5357333)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Electric Circus was a nightclub and discotheque located at 19-25 St. Marks Place between Second and Third Avenues in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, from 1967 to September 1971. The club was created by Jerry Brandt, Stanton J. Freeman and their partners and designed by Chermayeff & Geismar. With its invitation (from one of its press releases) to "play games, dress as you like, dance, sit, think, tune in and turn on," and its mix of light shows, music, circus performers and experimental theater, the Electric Circus embodied the wild and creative side of 1960s club culture.\n

'}
Elizabeth Street (Q5363575)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Elizabeth Street is a street in Manhattan, New York City, which runs north-south parallel to and west of the Bowery. The street is a popular shopping strip in Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood.

"}
Alzheimer's Foundation of America (Q16868916)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) is an American nonprofit organization based in New York City whose mission is to provide support, services and education to individuals, families and caregivers affected by Alzheimer's disease and related dementias nationwide, and fund research for better treatment and a cure. AFA unites more than 2,800 member organizations from coast-to-coast that are dedicated to meeting the educational, social, emotional and practical needs of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related illnesses, and their caregivers and families. Member organizations include grassroots Alzheimer's agencies, senior centers, adult daycare center, home healthcare agencies, long-term care residences, research facilities, and other dementia-related groups. AFA holds Charity Navigator's highest rating of 4 stars.

"}
Institute for Sustainable Communication (Q16847772)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Institute for Sustainable Communication, (ISC), was founded in 2003 and is a non-profit organization that is devoted to sustainability through the printing, digital media and advertising industries. These fields are known together as Graphic Communication. ISC has developed three programs to assist in broadening the use of sustainable business methods: fellowship and mentoring, research and consulting, and education and outreach.

'}
Caucasus (Q2081939)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Caucasus Egg is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made by Michael Perkhin under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1893. The egg was made for Alexander III of Russia, who presented it to his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna. \n

'}
Dyer Avenue (Q5318555)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Dyer Avenue is a short, north-south thoroughfare in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City, located between Ninth Avenue and Tenth Avenue. It is primarily used by traffic exiting the Lincoln Tunnel. Dyer Avenue runs between 30th Street and 42nd Street but functions as three distinct sections due to its connections with the south and center tubes of the Lincoln Tunnel. The southernmost section, between 30th and 31st Streets, leads to and from the Lincoln Tunnel Expressway. Dyre Avenue also exists between 34th and 36th Streets, and between 40th and 42nd Streets; both sections lead directly from the tunnel, but the 34th-36th Streets section also contains a roadway leading to the tunnel. The avenue is owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

"}
East 17th Street/Irving Place Historic District (Q5327618)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East 17th Street/Irving Place Historic District is a small historic district located primarily on East 17th Street between Union Square East and Irving Place in the Union Square neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on June 30, 1988, and encompasses nine mid-19th century rowhouses and apartment buildings on the south side of East 17th Street, from number 104 to number 122, plus one additional building at 47 Irving Place just south of 17th Street.

'}
East Side Middle School (Q5329374)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
  • \n
'}
East Village/Lower East Side Historic District (Q5329613)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East Village/Lower East Side Historic District in Lower Manhattan, New York City was created by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on October 9, 2012. It encompasses 330 buildings, mostly in the East Village neighborhood, primarily along Second Avenue between East 2nd and 6th Streets, and along the side streets. Some of the buildings are located in a second area between First Avenue and Avenue A along East 6th and 7th Streets. The district is based on the one which had been proposed by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, with only minor changes, and is the result of a two-year effort to protect the area.

'}
Edward J. Berwind House (Q5343618)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edward J. Berwind House is a mansion located on 2 East 64th Street and Fifth Avenue in the Upper East Side in New York City.\n

'}
Edward Mooney House (Q5344502)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Edward Mooney House located at 18 Bowery at the corner of Pell Street in the Chinatown neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City was built between 1785 and 1789 for wealthy butcher Edward Mooney on land he purchased after it was confiscated from British Loyalist James De Lancey.

'}
Elaine's (Q5353153)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Elaine's was a bar and restaurant in New York City that existed from 1963 to 2011. It was frequented by many celebrities, especially actors and authors. It was established and owned by, and named after, Elaine Kaufman, who was indelibly associated with the restaurant; Elaine's shut down several months after Kaufman died.

"}
Seneca Village (Q2103252)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Seneca Village was a 19th-century settlement of mostly African American landowners in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, within present-day Central Park. The settlement was located on about 5 acres (2.0\xa0ha) near the Upper West Side neighborhood, approximately bounded by 82nd and 89th Streets and Seventh and Eighth Avenues, had they been constructed.\n

'}
2006 New York City plane crash (Q2114686)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On October 11, 2006, a Cirrus SR20 aircraft crashed into the Belaire Apartments in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, at about 2:42\xa0p.m. EDT (18:42 UTC). The aircraft struck the north side of the building causing a fire in several apartments, which was extinguished within two hours.

'}
Duke Ellington Circle (Q5312765)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Duke Ellington Circle is a traffic circle located at the northeast corner of Central Park at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and 110th Street in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The traffic circle is named for the jazz musician Duke Ellington.\n

'}
East 80th Street Houses (Q5327628)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The East 80th Street Houses are a group of four attached rowhouses on that street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. They are built of brick with various stone trims in different versions of the Colonial Revival architectural style.\n

'}
East Campus (Q5327990)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

East Campus is a prominent building on the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University in New York City, located along Morningside Drive between 117th and 118th Streets. One of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood, it serves primarily as a residence hall for Columbia undergraduates, although it also contains a small hotel, the university's Center for Career Education, its Facilities Management office, and the Heyman Center for the Humanities. East Campus, a $28.7 million facility, was designed by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects and built in 1979-1982.\n

"}
Edwynn Houk Gallery (Q5346969)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nEdwynn Houk Gallery is a photography gallery specializing in masters of twentieth-century photography with an emphasis on the 1920s and 1930s as well as contemporary photography. Houk founded the gallery in 1980. Today, Houk Gallery has locations at 745 Fifth Avenue in New York City.

'}
Gate Theatre (Q5527001)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gate Theatre was an Off-Broadway theatre in New York City that was active during the 1950s through 1970s. Located at 162 Second Avenue in the East Village, the theatre was founded in 1957 by Lily Turner. It closed in the early 1970s.\n

'}
Gertle's Bake Shop (Q5553246)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Gertel's Bakery was a kosher bake shop on New York's Lower East Side. Located at 53 Hester Street, Gertel's Bakery operated from 1914 until the retail store closed on June 21, 2007. It merged with Delancey Bakery and its successor operates as Gertel's Uptown, 101 Steuben Street, Brooklyn, NY, providing wholesale business only.

"}
Gotham Comedy Club (Q5587807)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Gotham Comedy Club is a venue for stand-up comedy in New York City. The comedy club is located on 208 West 23rd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues in Chelsea.\n

'}
Media Development Investment Fund (Q17103456)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Media Development Investment Fund (MDIF), formerly Media Development Loan Fund, is a New York-registered non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and mission-driven investment fund that provides low-cost financing to independent news and information businesses in challenging environments, mostly in countries with a history of media oppression. As one of the United States-based groups involved in direct media development, it specializes in impact investing and provides affordable debt, equity and quasi-equity financing to help journalists build sustainable businesses around professional, responsible, quality journalism.

'}
Women's Prison Association (Q17019921)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Women's Prison Association (WPA), founded 1845, is the oldest advocacy group for women in the United States. The organization has historically focused on New York City and New York State issues. Since 2004 it has developed the Institute on Women & Criminal Justice, to focus a national conversation on women and criminal justice.

"}
Garden Theatre (Q5522338)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Garden Theatre was a major theatre on Madison Avenue and 27th Street in New York City, New York. The theatre opened on September 27, 1890, and closed in 1925. Part of the second Madison Square Garden complex, the theatre presented Broadway plays for two decades and then, as high-end theatres moved uptown to the Times Square area, became a facility for German and Yiddish theatre, motion pictures, lectures, and meetings of trade and political groups.\n

'}
Tontine Coffee House (Q7821697)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Tontine Coffee House was a coffeehouse in Manhattan, New York City, established in early 1793. Situated at 82 Wall Street, on the north-west corner of Water Street, it was built by a group of stockbrokers to serve as a meeting place for trade and correspondence. It was organized as a tontine, a type of investment plan, and funded by the sale of 203 shares of £200 each. The May 17, 1792, creation of the Buttonwood Agreement, which bound its signatories to trade only with each other, effectively gave rise to a new organization of tradespeople.

'}
Fourteenth Ward Industrial School (Q5475953)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Fourteenth Ward Industrial School is located at 256-258 Mott Street between Prince and Houston Streets in the Nolita neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built for the Children's Aid Society in 1888–89, with funds provided by John Jacob Astor III, and was designed by the firm of Vaux & Radford in the Victorian Gothic style. The Society built a number of schools for indigent children at the time. It was later known as the Astor Memorial School.

"}
Foxy Production (Q5477333)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nFoxy Production is a New York contemporary art gallery founded by Michael Gillespie and John Thomson.

'}
Franklin Square (Q5491845)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Franklin Square was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line in New York City. It was built by the New York Elevated Railroad in 1878 over the aforementioned square, had two tracks and one island platform, and was the northernmost station on the line that shared both Second Avenue and Third Avenue trains. The next stop to the north was Chatham Square. The next stop to the south was Fulton Street. The station closed on December 22, 1950.

'}
Franklin Square (Q5491846)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Franklin Square was a square in Manhattan on the intersection of Pearl, Dover and Cherry Streets. The elevated Manhattan Railway, built in 1877–1878, ran over Franklin Square, and a station was built there. On its west side were the buildings of Harper's Publishing House. The station and square were demolished in 1950, replaced with the Franklin Square Bridge, part of the Manhattan access to the Brooklyn Bridge. At the same time, the block of Cherry Street nearest the square was razed and replaced with the Alfred E. Smith Houses.\n

"}
French Institute Alliance Française (Q5501796)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) is a 501(c)(3) not–for–profit organization incorporated in the State of New York. Its mission is to enhance the knowledge and appreciation of French and Francophone culture, to increase the knowledge of the French language, and to encourage interaction among French, Francophone, and American people through programs in education and the arts.\n

'}
Gay Street (Q5528649)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Gay Street is a short, angled street that marks off one block of Greenwich Village in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street\'s name does not refer to the LGBT character of Greenwich Village, or to any other LGBT issues. Rather, the name may come from a family named Gay who owned land or lived there in colonial times: a newspaper of May 11, 1775 contains a classified ad where an "R. Gay", living in the Bowery, offers a gelding for sale.

'}
German Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Mark (Q5551093)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

German Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Mark is a historic church and synagogue building at 323 East 6th Street between First and Second Avenues in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The Renaissance Revival style church was built in 1847 by the Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Matthew which first rented it to St. Mark's and subsequently sold it to them in 1857. Much of the church membership was killed in the 1904 General Slocum disaster, and the congregation never recovered.

"}
Glad tidings tabernacle (Q5566199)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Glad Tidings Tabernacle is a church located at located at 2207 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between West 130th and 131st Street in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It has served New York City since 1907 with a focus on different cultures and diversity.\n

'}
The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music (Q7753740)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

School of Jazz and Contemporary Music at The New School is the second conservatory of The New School university. It is located on West 13th Street in New York City's Greenwich Village neighborhood. It was known as The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music before it was rebranded as School of Jazz and Contemporary Music and becoming part of College of Performing Arts at The New School in 2016.\n

"}
The New Actors Workshop (Q7753473)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New Actors Workshop was a two-year acting conservatory in New York City founded by Master Teachers Mike Nichols, George Morrison and Paul Sills in 1988. The school offered a unique, dual-track curriculum combining Stanislavski-based technique with Viola Spolin Theater Games. The workshop stopped accepting students in 2010.\n

'}
The Plumm (Q7757540)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Plumm was a nightclub that opened on April 28, 2006, near the Meatpacking District of Manhattan. It was co-owned by Noel Ashman, Chris Noth, Samantha Ronson, Joey McIntyre, Damon Dash, Jesse Bradford, Simon Rex, and Rodney Afshari among others.

'}
The Saint (Q7762051)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Saint was an American gay superclub, located in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It operated from 1980 to 1988.

'}
The New School for General Studies (Q7753738)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Schools of Public Engagement at The New School is one of five academic divisions that compose The New School, a private university located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. It includes, the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students, Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment founded in 1964, School of Media Studies, Creative Writing Program, the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs, and School of Languages.\n

"}
Times Square Hotel (Q7806559)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Times Square Hotel is located in New York, New York. The building was built in 1922 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 4, 1995.\n

'}
Theatre Comique (Q7777360)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Theatre Comique, formerly Wood's Minstrel Hall, was a venue on Broadway in Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1862, replacing a synagogue on the site.

"}
Tribeca Grill (Q7840381)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tribeca Grill is a New American restaurant located at 375 Greenwich Street (at Franklin Street) in Tribeca, Manhattan, in New York City, co-owned by Robert De Niro and Drew Nieporent. Celebrity investors include Bill Murray, Sean Penn, Christopher Walken, Ed Harris, and Lou Diamond Phillips, among others. It opened in 1990. The Executive Chef is Brenton Lee. The large mahogany bar in the center of the restaurant is from the former Maxwell's Plum restaurant.\n

"}
Fulton-Nassau Historic District (Q5508399)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n

'}
FusionArts Museum (Q5510244)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

FusionArts Museum(s), first founded at 57 Stanton Street on Manhattan\'s Lower East Side are a series of curated exhibition spaces dedicated to the exhibition and archiving of "fusion art". The museum was and remains at its successive locations a not-for-profit gallery operated by Converging Arts Media Organization, a not-for-profit arts organization which promotes emerging American and international fusion artists. Though the initial space in Manhattan was converted into a commercial art gallery in 2012 and is currently not operating as a Fusionarts museum, other spaces in Prague, Czech, Republic and Easton, Pennsylvania are.\n

'}
Gaiety Theatre (Q5517010)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gaiety Theatre was a Broadway theatre at 1547 Broadway in New York City from 1909 until 1982, when it was torn down.\n

'}
Gallatin Bank Building (Q5518882)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gallatin Bank Building was constructed in 1887 on a plot at 34 Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. It was enlarged from an original plot bought at 36 Wall Street when the bank was organized in 1829. The purchase price was $12,000. Originally called National Bank, the name was later changed to Gallatin because of its association with the family of Albert Gallatin. The architects were Cady, Berg & See. \n

'}
George Washington Hotel (Q5545985)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The George Washington Hotel is a hotel and boarding house located at 23 Lexington Avenue (between 23rd Street and 24th Street) in Gramercy Park, Manhattan, New York City. Located adjacent to the Baruch College and School of Visual Arts campuses, the hotel was opened in 1928. At different times it has been used both as a brothel and as a boot-legging house during Prohibition. \n

'}
Gilda's Club (Q5561499)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Gilda's Club is a community organization for people with cancer, their families and friends. Local chapters provide meeting places where those who have cancer, their families, and friends can join with others to build emotional and social support as a supplement to medical care. Free of charge and nonprofit, Gilda's Club chapters offer support and networking groups, lectures, workshops and social events in a nonresidential, homelike setting. The club was named in honor of original Saturday Night Live cast member, Gilda Radner, who died of ovarian cancer in 1989. \n

"}
The Scene (Q7762468)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Scene was a nightclub on West 46th Street, Manhattan, New York City operated by Steve Paul between 1964 and 1970. It was notable for historic performances by The Doors and Jimi Hendrix, among many others.\n

'}
Third Street Music School Settlement (Q7784968)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Founded in New York City in 1894, Third Street Music School is the longest-running community music school in the United States and traces its roots to the late 19th-century settlement house movement. As part of the settlement movement in which young university graduates "settled" in poor, immigrant communities to improve the quality of life, Third Street originally employed live-in social workers and offered baths to children along with music lessons. It was the unique inspiration of Third Street founder Emilie Wagner to make high quality music instruction the centerpiece of a community settlement house that also provided social services to the immigrant population of the Lower East Side.\n

'}
Tiffany and Company Building (Q7801275)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Tiffany and Company Building is a historic commercial building at 401 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan, New York City, New York. Completed in 1905, it was built for Tiffany and Company, whose headquarters it served as until 1940. Designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead, and White, its design is inspired by the Palazzo Grimani di San Luca in Venice, Italy. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1978 for its association with Tiffany, one of the world's leading jewelry firms.

"}
Triad Theater (Q7839895)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Triad Theatre, formerly known as Palsson's Supper Club, Steve McGraw's, and Stage 72, is a cabaret-style performing arts venue located on West 72nd Street on New York's Upper West Side. The theatre has been the original home to some of the longest running Off-Broadway shows including Forever Plaid, Forbidden Broadway, Spamilton, and Secrets Every Smart Traveler Should Know.\n

"}
Gavin Brown's Enterprise (Q5528081)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nGavin Brown's enterprise is an art gallery with venues in New York City and Rome owned by Gavin Brown.\n

"}
Girl Scout Museum and Archives (Q5564417)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Girl Scout Museum and Archives is part of the Girl Scout National Historic Preservation Center at the Girl Scouts headquarters located at 420 Fifth Avenue in New York City. It was founded in 1987 to promote and preserve scouting history and its collection dates back to 1912 when the Girl Scouts were founded. The museum holds more than 60,000 photos, 7,000 publications, 650 uniforms and an a/v collection dating back to 1918.\n

'}
Gorman Park (Q5586633)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Gorman Park is a 1.89-acre (0.76\xa0ha) park in Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City. It is bounded by Broadway on the west and Wadsworth Terrace on the east and stretches from 188th to 190th Streets. The land rises more than a hundred feet in a steep incline from Broadway to Wadsworth Terrace. The park features a path that winds upward among trees. \n

'}
The Paterno (Q7756319)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Paterno is a Manhattan apartment building located at 116th Street and Riverside Drive and also known as 440 Riverside Drive. The building is noted for its curved facade, impressive marble lobby with a stained-glass ceiling, and substantial porte-cochère. Across 116th Street, The Paterno faces the Colosseum, another building with a similar curved facade. The New York Times has said that the "opposing curves, (form) a gateway as impressive as any publicly built arch or plaza in New York.

'}
Trinity Chapel, New York University (Q7842629)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Holy Trinity Chapel of New York University was NYU's former Generoso Pope Catholic Center and Catholic chapel, located at 58 Washington Square South, West Village, Manhattan, New York. It was built 1961–1964 and was a prominent example of the Brutalist architectural style, executed in reinforced concrete and modernist stained glass. It was designed by the noted American architectural firm of Eggers & Higgins.

"}
Tunnel (Q7853273)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Tunnel was a nightclub in New York City, located at 220 Twelfth Avenue, in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It operated from 1986 to 2001.\n

'}
Fort Washington Avenue (Q5472255)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Fort Washington Avenue is a major north-south street in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. It runs from Fort Tryon Park to 159th Street, where it intersects with Broadway. It goes past Bennett Park, the highest natural point in Manhattan. Famous residents of Fort Washington Avenue include Drs. Henry Kissinger and Ruth Westheimer, TV\'s "Doctor Ruth".\n

'}
General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of New York (Q5532207)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of New York, was founded on November 17, 1785, by 22 men who gathered in Walter Heyer's public-house on Pine Street in Lower Manhattan. The aims of the General Society were to provide cultural, educational and social services to families of skilled craftsmen. The General Society during this early period celebrated the mutuality and centrality of the craft community. Besides its charitable activities, the society played a prominent part in the festivities that marked patriotic holidays, carrying banners emblazoned with its slogan 'By hammer and hand all arts do stand', echoing the motto of the Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths.\n

"}
George Abbott Way (Q5536037)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

George Abbott Way is a section of West 45th Street northwest of Times Square between Seventh and Eighth Avenues in New York City, named for Broadway producer and director George Abbott. It is located between Rodgers and Hammerstein Row and Restaurant Row.\n

'}
George Blumenthal House (Q5537058)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The George Blumenthal House was a mansion located on 50 East 70th Street in New York City. It was constructed for George Blumenthal.\n

'}
Gerde's Folk City (Q5550513)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Gerdes Folk City (sometimes spelled Gerde\'s Folk City) was a music venue in the West Village, part of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, in New York City. Initially opened as a restaurant called Gerdes, by owner Mike Porco, it eventually began to present occasional incidental music. First located at 11 West 4th Street (in a building which no longer exists), it moved in 1970 to 130 West 3rd Street. It closed in 1987. On January 26, 1960, Gerdes turned into a music venue called The Fifth Peg, in cooperation with Izzy Young, the director of the Folklore Center. The Fifth Peg\'s debut bill was gospel folk singer Brother John Sellars and Ed McCurdy, writer of the anti-war classic "Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream". Porco and Young had a falling-out, and on June 1, 1960, Gerdes Folk City was officially born with a bill featuring folksingers Carolyn Hester and Logan English. At this time Gerdes Folk City was booked by a folk enthusiast Charlie Rothschild (who later became Judy Collins\' longtime manager) and English. Gerdes Folk City was suddenly one of the central music venues of the era. It became one of the most influential American music clubs, before finally losing its lease in 1987. "Rolling Stone Book of Lists" called Folk City one of the three top music venues in the world, along with The Cavern and CBGB. Folk City helped to launch the careers of several world-renowned musical stars from Bob Dylan to Sonic Youth, and showcased numerous music styles from folk to alternative rock.\n

'}
USS Recruit (Q5568581)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

USS Recruit, also known as the Landship Recruit, was a wooden mockup of a dreadnought battleship constructed by the United States Navy in Manhattan in New York City, as a recruiting tool and training ship during the First World War. Commissioned as if it were a normal vessel of the U.S. Navy and manned by a crew of trainee sailors, Recruit was located in Union Square from 1917 until the end of the war. In 1920, with the reduced requirements for manning in the post-war Navy, Recruit was decommissioned and dismantled, having recruited 25,000 sailors into Navy service.\n

'}
The Rogosin Institute (Q7761350)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Rogosin Institute is an independent, not-for-profit treatment and research center with facilities throughout New York City that treat patients with kidney disease, including dialysis and kidney transplantation; lipid disorders; and hypertension. It is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College and is a leader in research programs for cancer and diabetes.\n

'}
The Stone (Q7766585)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stone is a not-for-profit experimental music performance space located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood in New York City. It was founded in April 2005 by John Zorn, who serves as the artistic director. It was named for the late Irving Stone, an "inveterate concertgoer" in the New York City music community.

'}
The Theatre Museum (Q7768627)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Theatre Museum (TTM) is located at 30 Worth Street in Manhattan, New York City. Its mission is to preserve, protect and perpetuate the legacy of theatre, including Broadway theatre. The Theatre Museum continues the legacy of The Broadway Theatre Institute begun in 1995 by presenting Awards for Excellence in Theatre History Preservation and Theatre Arts Education. It currently functioning as a museum-at-large and is not open to the public.\n

'}
The Wall (Q7773304)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wall, also known as The Gateway to Soho, is a piece of minimalist art that was constructed in the SoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was part of the building that stands at 599 Broadway until 2002 when the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) gave the owners permission to take it down so the interior wall could be repaired. The artwork has since been re-installed.\n

'}
Tier 3 (Q7801076)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tier 3 was a no wave art nightclub that was located in downtown TriBeCa in Manhattan at the juncture of West Broadway and White Street. In the late 1970s, it became a major fixture in the city's underground music and counterculture scene, along with the Mudd Club. Live performances showcased punk rock, ska, noise music, new wave and experimental music.

"}
TACT (Q7669195)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Actors Company Theatre (TACT) is an Off-Broadway theatre company that was founded in 1992 by a group of New York stage veterans. For their first several years, TACT produced a number of concert performances, a cross between a staged reading and a full production. In 2006, TACT began a residency at the Beckett Theatre on Theatre Row to produce two full plays a year. TACT focuses on reviving lesser-known productions that have not been performed in New York for several years. Their mission statement, according to their website, is "to present neglected or rarely produced plays of literary merit, with a focus on creating theatre from its essence: the text and the actor\'s ability to bring it to life."

'}
The Colosseum (Q7726860)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Colosseum is an apartment building located at 116th Street and Riverside Drive in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Tanya Bonakdar Gallery (Q7683979)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nTanya Bonakdar Gallery is an art gallery founded by Tanya Bonakdar, located in both Chelsea in New York City and Los Angeles. Since its inception in 1994, the gallery has exhibited new work by contemporary artists in all media, including painting, sculpture, installation, photography, and video.\n

'}
Tenjune (Q7699890)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Tenjune was a nightclub in the Meatpacking District of Manhattan, New York City, on Little West 12th Street. The music played in the club ranges from hip-hop to techno.\n

'}
Terminal Bar (Q7702636)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Terminal Bar was a bar on Times Square in New York City at 41th Street and 8th Avenue. It had a reputation as one of the roughest bars in the city and was located across from the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Terminal Bar originally had a mainly Irish American clientele, but over time evolved into a predominantly African American and gay bar.

'}
The Art Institute of New York City (Q7714384)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Art Institute of New York City was a for-profit college in New York City. It was one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 44 education institutions throughout North America, providing education in design, media arts, and fashion. Founded in 1980 as The New York Restaurant School, and renamed in 2001, it was accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools.\n

'}
The Gallery (Q7735636)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gallery was a disco in SoHo, Manhattan which was opened in February 1973 by disc jockey Nicky Siano and his older brother Joe Siano. The first location of The Gallery, located on 132 West 22nd Street, closed in July 1974. It reopened in November 1974 at 172 Mercer and Houston Streets and closed in October 1977. Famed DJs Larry Levan and Frankie Knuckles both worked at the club, but not at the DJ booth. Grace Jones and Loleatta Holloway both made their debut performances at The Gallery.

'}
The Great Saunter (Q7737927)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Great Saunter is a daylong hike that explores Manhattan’s 32-mile shoreline, visiting more than 20 parks and promenades of Manhattan Island. Manhattan's waterfront rim has evolved since Shorewalkers Inc., a nonprofit environmental and walking group, began fighting for a public shoreline walkway in 1982. Now the path is nearly contiguous. The Saunter takes place on the first Saturday in May,\xa0recognized by the NYC as Great Saunter Day.\n

"}
Roxy Theatre (Q2170757)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Roxy Theatre was a 5,920 seat movie theater located at 153 West 50th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues, just off Times Square in New York City. It opened on March 11, 1927 with the silent film The Love of Sunya, produced by and starring Gloria Swanson. The huge movie palace was a leading Broadway film showcase through the 1950s and was also noted for its lavish stage shows. It closed and was demolished in 1960.\n

'}
The Camera Club of New York (Q7721085)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Since 1884, The Camera Club of New York has been a forum to explore photography. Though the Club was created by well-to-do 'gentlemen' photography enthusiasts seeking a refuge from the mass popularization of the medium in the 1880s, it accepted its first woman as a member, Miss Elizabeth A. Slade, in 1887, only four years after its inception, and later came to accept new ideas and new approaches to the medium.\n

"}
The Dump (Q7731211)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Dump was a popular saloon and dive bar in New York City from the 1890s to about 1910. Owned by Jimmy Lee and Slim Reynolds, it was one of several establishments frequented by the underworld, most especially the Bowery Bums. It has been claimed that Tom Lee, head of the On Leong Tong, also ran the establishment at one time.

'}
The Living Room (Q7747868)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Living Room was a music venue on Metropolitan Avenue in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, which was originally established on Stanton Street of the Lower East Side in New York City in New York City in 1988. The Living Room was co-owned by Steve Rosenthal and Jennifer Gilson. The Living Room has showcased some of the best of New York City’s singer/songwriter, alt-country, and rock. It moved to Brooklyn in 2015 before closing down in December of the same year.

'}
Franklin Street (Q5491869)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Franklin Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It opened on January 21, 1873 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was Warren Street. The next northbound stop was Desbrosses Street.\n

'}
Sushi Yasuda (Q7648927)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sushi Yasuda is a Japanese sushi restaurant located at 204 East 43rd Street (between Second Avenue and Third Avenue) in the Midtown East area of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Symphony Space (Q7661643)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Symphony Space, founded by Isaiah Sheffer and Allan Miller, is a multi-disciplinary performing arts organization at 2537 Broadway on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Performances take place in the 760-seat Peter Jay Sharp Theatre (also called Peter Norton Symphony Space) or the 160-seat Leonard Nimoy Thalia. Programs include music, dance, theater, film, and literary readings. In addition, Symphony Space provides literacy programs and the Curriculum Arts Project, which integrates performing arts into social studies curricula in New York City Public Schools.\n

'}
The Levin Institute (Q7747025)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Neil D. Levin Graduate Institute of International Relations and Commerce (in short form, the Levin Institute) was established by Governor George Pataki and the State of New York. It is located in the Manhattan district of New York City, and is part of the State University of New York (SUNY). It is the 65th institution in the SUNY system, and is housed in the historic William and Helen Ziegler House (now named the SUNY Global Center).\n

'}
Taras Shevchenko Place (Q7685550)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Taras Shevchenko Place is a street in New York City named after Taras Shevchenko, who is commonly considered to be one of the greatest Ukrainian poets. Taras Shevchenko Place connects 6th Street and 7th Street between Second and Third Avenues in the East Village. It abuts the back of 41 Cooper Square to the west.\n

'}
The Anderson School (Q7713696)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Anderson School PS 334 is a New York City school for children in grades kindergarten through 8 from the city's five boroughs. It was founded thirty-two years ago (September 1987) as The Anderson Program under the stewardship of PS 9. The New York City Department of Education (DOE) spun off Anderson in July 2005 as a stand-alone school — PS 334.\n

"}
Pratt Institute School of Information (Q16983719)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pratt Institute School of Information (SI or iSchool), previously School of Information and Library Science (SILS), administers the oldest Library and Information Science program in North America. It was created in Brooklyn, New York City, in 1890 shortly after Melvil Dewey created such a program at Columbia University in 1887. Pratt School of Information is one of the six schools of Pratt Institute. Based in Manhattan, the school administers a master of information and library science degree program that has been accredited by the American Library Association since the 1924/1925 academic year.

'}
St. Mark's Bookshop (Q16984998)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Mark\'s Bookshop was an independent book store, established in 1977 in New York City\'s East Village neighborhood. It was the oldest independent bookstore in Manhattan owned by its original owners. The shop, run by proprietors Bob Contant and Terry McCoy, specialized in cultural and critical theory, graphic design, poetry, small presses, and film studies—what the New York Times called "neighborhood-appropriate literature".\nIt featured periodicals and journals, including foreign titles, and included sections on anarchists, art criticism, women\'s studies, music, drama, and drugs.

'}
Substation 7 (Q16900829)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Substation 7 is a traction substation located at 1782 Third Avenue at 99th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The Manhattan Railway Company built it in order to electrify the Second, Third and Ninth Avenue elevated lines. It served as a power source for the IRT Lexington Avenue Line from 1918 until the 1970s. It originally converted 25\xa0Hz AC power from the 74th Street power station, to DC for the electric motors. The substation is owned by the MTA and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

'}
Tina Kim Gallery (Q16901731)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Tina Kim Gallery is a New York City-based contemporary art gallery and exhibition space. The gallery was established in 2001 by Tina Kim and is located in the Chelsea.

'}
Victoria Theater (Q16986504)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Victoria Theatre (1899–1915) was a prominent American vaudeville house during the early years of the twentieth century. Theatre mogul, Oscar Hammerstein I, opened it in 1899 on the northwest corner of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street, along New York City’s Longacre Square (now Times Square). The theatre was closely associated with the Paradise Roof Garden above it, and the two venues came to be known collectively as Hammerstein’s.

'}
8th Street and St. Mark's Place (Q2142493)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and also from Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark's Place, after the nearby St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.\n

"}
Cathedral School of St. John the Divine (Q7721720)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine is an independent, Episcopal, K-8 day school for girls and boys of all faiths located in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City. Founded in 1901, it is located on the 13-acre campus of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and has an enrollment of 300 students. The School is divided into a Lower School (Grades K-4) and an Upper School (Grades 5-8).\n

'}
The Forum at 343 East 74th Street (Q7734922)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Forum at 343 East 74th Street is a 25-story residential condop building located on the Upper East Side in New York City. The building's location, midblock between First and Second Avenue on 74th Street makes the building visible from many parts of the Upper East Side. \n

"}
The Lang School (Q7745445)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Lang School is a private, nonprofit, K-12 school for gifted and twice exceptional (2e) students located in New York City's Financial District. It was the first K-12 school to specialize in educating twice-exceptional (2e) students, though it later came to include (and currently does accept) a wider range of gifted students.\n

"}
The Harlem School of the Arts (Q7738910)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harlem School of the Arts (HSA) in Harlem, New York was founded in 1964 by soprano Dorothy Maynor, and offers its programs to students of all ages. Mezzo-soprano Betty Allen succeeded Maynor as President in 1979 when a new 37,000 square foot facility designed by Ulrich Franzen was completed. Other Presidents include Allicia Adams, Camille Akjeu, and Daryl Durham. In August 2015, new President and CEO, Eric G. Pryor, was named.\n

'}
ImaginAsian (Q7741449)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The ImaginAsian was a movie theater in midtown Manhattan, New York City, dedicated to exclusively showcasing Asian and Asian American films. Located on 59th Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, The ImaginAsian was owned by ImaginAsian Entertainment, which also operates ImaginAsian TV (a 24/7 cable network), ImaginAsian Radio, and iaLink, an online e-zine. All films shown at The ImaginAsian are in their original language and subtitled for English-speaking audiences.\n

'}
Calder's set for Socrate (Q16890073)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The original Decor for Satie\'s "Socrate" was designed by mobile artist Alexander Calder for a touring performance of Erik Satie’s symphonic drama Socrate in 1936. It was a mobile set considered by Virgil Thomson as one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century theatre design. It consisted of three elements: a red disc, interlocking steel hoops, and a vertical rectangle, black on one side and white on the other, against a blue backdrop. Destroyed in a fire in 1936, the decor was recreated by Walter Hatke in 1976 for a performance in New York.

'}
Algus Greenspon Gallery (Q16827087)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Greenspon is an art gallery located in the West Village of New York City owned by Amy Greenspon.\n

'}
Jungle City Studios (Q16892967)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Jungle City Studios is a recording studio owned and operated by Ann Mincieli, Alicia Keys's longtime engineer and studio coordinator. Located in Chelsea, Manhattan, it was designed by John Storyk of Walters-Storyk Design Group.

"}
Young Women's Leadership School of East Harlem (Q16904141)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Young Women's Leadership School of East Harlem (TYWLS) is a public all-girls school in East Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The school serve approximately 440 young women in 6th through 12th grade. It is part of the Young Women's Leadership Network (YWLN).\nIt was founded in 1996 by Ann and Andrew Tisch and New York City's Center for Education Innovation Public Education Association. They believed that it would help school families because in other public schools many girls weren't heard and the graduation rates were low. Then-Chancellor Rudy Crew led the project to the unanimous support of the New York City Board of Education.\n

"}
LaGuardia New Music Ensemble (Q16998975)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The LaGuardia New Music Ensemble is an ever-changing composition collective at New York's LaGuardia School for Music and Art. It is notable for being the incubator of multiple industry professionals and one of the foremost popular music composition seminars in the country. The ensemble is best known for its collaborations with the NPR program Radiolab.

"}
Royal Roost (Q2171110)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Royal Roost was a jazz club located at 1580 Broadway in New York City.\n

'}
Syms School of Business (Q7661915)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Sy Syms School of Business (formerly the Syms School of Business) is Yeshiva University's business school. It offers both undergraduate and graduate business programs at the Wilf Campus in New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood, and at the Beren Campus in New York’s Murray Hill neighborhood.\n

"}
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (Q16841383)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation was established by Harry Guggenheim to support research on violence, aggression, and dominance.\n

'}
Jack's Stir Brew Coffee (Q16997525)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Jack’s Stir Brew Coffee is a coffeehouse with six locations in New York City as well as one in Amagansett, NY and another in Sag Harbor, NY. The first location in the historic Greenwich Village on W. 10th Street was opened by owner Jack Mazzola in 2003. It was the first Organic, Fair Trade, Shade-Grown coffeeshop in the city. The coffee is prepared using the patented Stir Brew method.

'}
Old Reliable Theatre Tavern (Q16983154)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Old Reliable Theatre Tavern (or The O.R.) was located at 213 E. 3rd Street in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City's Lower East Side, and played a vital part of the early Off-Off-Broadway scene. The Old Reliable presented plays by Guy Gauthier, Ilsa Gilbert, William M. Hoffman, Michael McGrinder, Stanley Nelson, Jeannine O'Reilly, Robert Patrick, Joseph Renard, Donald Kvares and Thomas Terefenko.

"}
Park Avenue (Q109711)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan. For most of the road's length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue's entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies to the section between the Bowery and 14th Street. The avenue is called Union Square East between 14th and 17th Streets, and Park Avenue South between 17th and 32nd Streets.\n

"}
Lexington Avenue (Q109739)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lexington Avenue, often colloquially abbreviated as "Lex", is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. Along its 5.5-mile (8.9-kilometer), 110-block route, Lexington Avenue runs through Harlem, Carnegie Hill, the Upper East Side, Midtown, and Murray Hill to a point of origin that is centered on Gramercy Park. South of Gramercy Park, the axis continues as Irving Place from 20th Street to East 14th Street.\n

'}
Madison Avenue (Q109849)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States, that carries northbound one-way traffic. It runs from Madison Square (at 23rd Street) to meet the southbound Harlem River Drive at 142nd Street. In doing so, it passes through Midtown, the Upper East Side (including Carnegie Hill), East Harlem, and Harlem. It is named after and arises from Madison Square, which is itself named after James Madison, the fourth President of the United States.\n

'}
Fifth Avenue (Q109858)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It stretches north from Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village to West 143rd Street in Harlem. It is considered one of the most expensive and elegant streets in the world.

'}
Seventh Avenue (Q109926)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Seventh Avenue\xa0– known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard north of Central Park\xa0– is a thoroughfare on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is southbound below Central Park and a two-way street north of the park.\n

'}
Eighth Avenue (Q109951)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eighth Avenue is a major north–south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street. While the avenue has different names at different points in Manhattan, it is actually one continuous stretch of road.\n

'}
34th Street (Q110049)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

34th Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs the width of Manhattan Island from West Side Highway on the West Side to the FDR Drive on the East Side. 34th Street is used as a crosstown artery between New Jersey to the west and Queens to the east, connecting the Lincoln Tunnel to New Jersey with the Queens\xa0Midtown Tunnel to Long Island.\n

'}
23rd Street (Q118599)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

23rd Street is a broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan, one of the major two-way, east-west streets in the borough\'s grid. As with Manhattan\'s other "crosstown" streets, it is divided into its east and west sections at Fifth Avenue. The street runs from Avenue C and FDR Drive in the east to Eleventh Avenue in the west.\n

'}
42nd Street (Q110061)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, running primarily in Midtown Manhattan and Hell's Kitchen. The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The street is known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square, and as such is also the name of the region of the theater district (and, at times, the red-light district) near that intersection. \n

"}
Peking (Q249918)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Peking is a steel-hulled four-masted barque. A so-called Flying P-Liner of the German company F. Laeisz, it was one of the last generation of cargo-carrying iron-hulled sailing ships used in the nitrate trade and wheat trade around Cape Horn.\n

'}
General Electric Building (Q244391)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The General Electric Building, also known as 570 Lexington Avenue, is a historic 50-floor, 640-foot (200\xa0m)-tall, skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, at the southwest corner of Lexington Avenue and 51st Street. Originally known as the RCA Victor Building when designed in 1931 by John W. Cross of Cross & Cross, it is sometimes known by its address to avoid confusion with the much later renaming – in 1988 – of the RCA Building at 30 Rockefeller Plaza as the "GE Building", itself later renamed the "Comcast Building".\n

'}
59th Street (Q245364)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

59th Street is a crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, running from York Avenue/Sutton Place to the West Side Highway, with a discontinuity between Ninth Avenue/Columbus Avenue and Eighth Avenue/Central Park West where the Time Warner Center is located. At Second Avenue, 59th Street branches off onto the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, which is often referred to as the 59th Street Bridge, even though 59th Street continues east to York Avenue/Sutton Place.\n

'}
42nd Street Shuttle (Q126698)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 42nd Street Shuttle is a New York City Subway shuttle train service that operates in Manhattan. The shuttle is sometimes referred to as the Grand Central/Times Square Shuttle, since these are the only two stations it serves. The shuttle runs at all times except late nights, with trains running on three tracks underneath 42nd Street between Times Square and Grand Central. With two stations, it is the shortest regular service in the system by number of stops, running about 2,402 feet (732\xa0m) in 90 seconds. The shuttle is used by over 100,000 passengers every day, and by up to 10,200 passengers per hour during rush hours.

'}
Construction of the World Trade Center (Q811095)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The construction of the first World Trade Center complex in New York City was conceived as an urban renewal project to help revitalize Lower Manhattan spearheaded by David Rockefeller. The project was developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The idea for the World Trade Center arose after World War II as a way to supplement existing avenues of international commerce in the United States.\n

'}
Fulton Center (Q1020690)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fulton Center is a subway and retail complex centered at the intersection of Fulton Street and Broadway in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The complex was built as part of a $1.4 billion project by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), a public agency of the state of New York, to rehabilitate the New York City Subway's Fulton Street station. The work involved constructing new underground passageways and access points into the complex, renovating the constituent stations, and erecting a large station building that doubles as a part of the Westfield World Trade Center mall.\n

"}
Harvey Milk High School (Q626235)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harvey Milk High School (HMHS)) is a public high school in the East Village of New York City designed for, though not limited to, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender young people, as well as those questioning their sexuality. It is named after San Francisco, California supervisor Harvey Milk, the first openly gay man to be elected to a public office in the United States.\n

'}
The Wooster Group (Q622556)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Wooster Group is a New York City-based experimental theater company known for creating numerous original dramatic works. It gradually emerged from Richard Schechner's The Performance Group (1967–1980) during the period from 1975 to 1980, and took its name in 1980; the independent productions of 1975–1980 are retroactively attributed to the Group.

"}
V-J Day in Times Square (Q626926)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

V-J Day in Times Square (also V-Day and The Kiss) is a photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt that portrays a U.S. Navy sailor grabbing and kissing a stranger—a woman in a white dress—on Victory over Japan Day ("V-J Day") in New York City\'s Times Square on August 14, 1945. The photograph was published a week later in Life magazine, among many photographs of celebrations around the United States that were presented in a twelve-page section titled "Victory Celebrations". A two-page spread faces three other kissing poses among celebrators in Washington, D.C.; Kansas City; and Miami opposite Eisenstaedt\'s, which was given a full-page display. Kissing was a favorite pose encouraged by media photographers of service personnel during the war, but Eisenstaedt was photographing a spontaneous event that occurred in Times Square soon before the announcement of the end of the war with Japan was made by U.S. President Harry S. Truman at seven o\'clock.\n

'}
CBGB (Q1022965)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

CBGB was a New York City music club opened in 1973 by Hilly Kristal in Manhattan's East Village. \n\n

"}
91st Street (Q999188)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

91st Street was a local station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at 91st Street and Broadway on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The station opened on October 27, 1904 as part of the first IRT line. It closed on February 2, 1959 due to its proximity to the 96th Street station, whose platforms had been lengthened southward toward the 91st Street station.\n

'}
Second Avenue (Q124914)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Second Avenue is located on the East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan extending from Houston Street at its south end to the Harlem River Drive at 128th Street at its north end. A one-way street, vehicular traffic on Second Avenue runs southbound (downtown) only, except for a one-block segment of the avenue in Harlem. South of Houston Street, the roadway continues as Chrystie Street south to Canal Street.\n

'}
Birdland (Q256347)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Birdland is a jazz club started in New York City on December 15, 1949. The original Birdland, which was located at 1678 Broadway, just north of West 52nd Street in Manhattan, was closed in 1965 due to increased rents, but it re-opened for one night in 1979. A revival began in 1986 with the opening of the second nightclub by the same name that is now located in Manhattan's Theater District, not far from the original nightclub's location. The current location is in the same building as the previous New York Observer headquarters.\n

"}
Pale Male (Q588448)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Pale Male (hatched in 1990) is a red-tailed hawk who has been residing since the 1990s near New York City's Central Park. Birdwatcher and author Marie Winn gave him his name because of the unusually light coloring of his head. He is one of the first red-tailed hawks known to have nested on a building rather than in a tree and is known for establishing a dynasty of urban-dwelling red-tailed hawks. Each spring, bird watchers set up telescopes at the Model Boat Pond to observe his nest and chicks at 927 Fifth Avenue. As of 2015, he is presumed deceased.

"}
First Avenue (Q124947)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

First Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan, running from Houston Street northbound to 127th Street. At 125th Street, most traffic continues onto the Willis Avenue Bridge over the Harlem River, which continues into the Bronx. South of Houston Street, the roadway continues as Allen Street south to Division Street. Traffic on First Avenue runs northbound (uptown) only.\n

'}
Century Building (Q601881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Century Building (formerly also known as the Drapery Building) is a Queen Anne style building at 33 East 17th Street between Park Avenue South and Broadway in Union Square, Manhattan, New York City. It was designed by William Schickel and built in 1880–1881 by Arnold Constable & Company as a speculative development with no main tenant. The building contained the headquarters of the Century Publishing Company from 1881 until 1915, and was also occupied by various other commercial and industrial concerns. Left vacant in the late 1970s, it was renovated into a Barnes & Noble bookstore in 1995. The Century Building was designated a New York City landmark in 1986, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

'}
Yivo Institute for Jewish Research (Q259337)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

YIVO (Yiddish: ייִוואָ, [jiˈvɔ]), established in 1925 in Wilno in the Second Polish Republic (now Vilnius, Lithuania) as the Yidisher Visnshaftlekher Institut (Yiddish: ייִדישער װיסנשאַפֿטלעכער אינסטיטוט, pronounced\xa0[ˈjidiʃɛr ˈvisən.ʃaftlɛχɛr instiˈtut], Yiddish Scientific Institute), is an organization that preserves, studies, and teaches the cultural history of Jewish life throughout Eastern Europe, Germany, and Russia as well as orthography, lexicography, and other studies related to Yiddish. (The word yidisher means both "Yiddish" and "Jewish.") The English name of the organization was changed to the Institute for Jewish Research after its relocation to New York City, but it is still known mainly by its Yiddish acronym. YIVO is now a partner of the Center for Jewish History and serves as the de facto recognized language regulator of the Yiddish language.\n

'}
Tower Building (Q16985698)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Tower Building was a structure in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, located at 50-52 Broadway on a lot that extended east to New Street. It was arguably New York City's first skyscraper, and the first building with a steel skeleton structure. Architect Bradford Gilbert filed plans for its construction on April 17, 1888, it was completed on September 27, 1889 and demolished beginning in 1913.

"}
Nightingale-Bamford School (Q580905)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Nightingale-Bamford School is an independent all-female university-preparatory school founded in 1920 by Frances Nicolau Nightingale and Maya Stevens Bamford. Located in Manhattan on the Upper East Side, Nightingale-Bamford is a member of the New York Interschool consortium.\n

'}
German-American Steuben Parade (Q253947)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The German-American Steuben Parade is an annual parade traditionally held in cities across the United States on Von Steuben Day.

'}
Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive (Q124973)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The FDR Drive (officially referred to as the Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive) is a 9.68-mile (15.58\xa0km) limited-access parkway on the east side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It starts near South and Broad Streets, just north of the Battery Park Underpass, and runs north along the East River to the 125th Street\xa0/ Robert F. Kennedy Bridge\xa0/ Willis Avenue Bridge interchange, where it becomes the Harlem River Drive. All of the FDR Drive is designated New York State Route\xa0907L (NY\xa0907L), an unsigned reference route.\n

'}
72nd Street (Q264022)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

72nd Street is one of the major bi-directional crosstown streets in New York City's borough of Manhattan. The street primarily runs through the Upper West Side and Upper East Side neighborhoods. It is one of the few streets to go through Central Park via Women's Gate, Terrace Drive, and Inventors Gate, though Terrace Drive is often closed to vehicular traffic.\n

"}
Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service (Q618001)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service (NYU Wagner, Wagner) is a public policy school that offers a comprehensive curriculum in public and nonprofit policy and management, health policy and management, international development, and urban planning.\n

"}
Staten Island Ferry (Q1048582)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry route operated by the New York City Department of Transportation. The ferry's single route runs 5.2 miles (8.4\xa0km) through New York Harbor between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island, with ferry boats making the trip in approximately 25 minutes. The ferry operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with boats leaving every 15 to 20 minutes during peak hours and every 30 minutes at other times. It is the only direct mass-transit connection between the two boroughs. Historically, the Staten Island Ferry has charged a relatively low fare compared to other modes of transit in the area; and since 1997 the route has been fare-free. The Staten Island Ferry is one of several ferry systems in the New York City area and is operated separately from systems such as NYC Ferry and NY Waterway.\n

"}
Houston Street (Q658443)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Houston Street ( HOW-stən) is a major east-west thoroughfare in downtown Manhattan, running crosstown across the full width of the island of Manhattan, from Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive (FDR Drive) and East River Park on the East River to Pier 40 and West Street on the Hudson River. It was the southernmost street in Manhattan to reach both rivers between 1971 and the 2000s. It generally serves as the boundary between neighborhoods, with Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo, Greenwich Village, and the West Village lying to the north of the street, and the Lower East Side, most of the Bowery, Nolita, and SoHo to the south. The numeric street-naming grid in Manhattan, created as part of the Commissioners\' Plan of 1811, begins immediately north of Houston Street with 1st Street at Avenue A, although the grid does not fully come into effect until 13th Street.

'}
Exxon Building (Q173498)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

1251 Avenue of the Americas, formerly known as the Exxon Building, is a skyscraper on Sixth Avenue (also known as Avenue of the Americas) in Manhattan, New York City, between 49th and 50th Streets. It is owned by Mitsui Fudosan. The structure is built in the international style and looks like a simple cuboid devoid of any ornamentation. The vertical façade consists of alternating narrow glass and limestone stripes. The glass stripes are created by windows and opaque spandrels, forming continuous areas that are washed by machines sliding down the façade. A seven-floor base wraps around the western portion of the building, and there is a sunken plaza with a large two-tier pool and fountains facing Sixth Avenue. In the plaza stands the bronze statue named Out to Lunch by John Seward Johnson II—of the same series as the one standing outside the 270 Park Avenue.

'}
Bank of America Tower (Q328505)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bank of America Tower is a 1,200\xa0ft (365.8\xa0m) skyscraper in the Midtown area of Manhattan in New York City. It is located at One Bryant Park, on Sixth Avenue between 42nd and 43rd Streets diagonally opposite Bryant Park.\n

'}
Late Show with David Letterman (Q858778)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Late Show with David Letterman is an American late-night talk show hosted by David Letterman on CBS, the first iteration of the Late Show franchise. The show debuted on August 30, 1993, and was produced by Letterman's production company, Worldwide Pants, and CBS Television Studios. The show's music director and leader of the house band, the CBS Orchestra, was Paul Shaffer. The head writer was Matt Roberts and the announcer was originally Bill Wendell, then Alan Kalter. Of the major U.S. late-night programs, Late Show ranked second in cumulative average viewers over time and third in number of episodes over time. In most U.S. markets the show aired from 11:35\xa0p.m. to 12:35\xa0a.m. Eastern and Pacific Time, and recorded Monday to Wednesdays at 4:30\xa0p.m., and Thursdays at 3:30\xa0p.m. and 6:00\xa0p.m. Eastern Time. The second Thursday episode usually aired on Friday of that week.

"}
Yeshiva University (Q1048851)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Yeshiva University is a private research university with four campuses in New York City. The university\'s undergraduate schools — Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Syms School of Business — offer a dual curriculum inspired by Modern-Centrist-Orthodox Judaism\'s hashkafa (philosophy) of Torah Umadda ("Torah and secular knowledge"), combining academic education with the study of the Torah. While the majority of students at the university are of the Jewish faith, many students, especially at the Cardozo School of Law, the School of Business, the Graduate School of Psychology, and the Medical School, are not Jewish.\n

'}
Mourning Portrait of the Duchess of Alba (Q655420)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Black Duchess (also Mourning Portrait of the Duchess of Alba or simply Portrait of the Duchess of Alba) is a 1797 oil-on-canvas painting by Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The Duchess in the painting is María Cayetana de Silva, 13th Duchess of Alba, then 35 years old. It is a companion piece to the more chaste The White Duchess, completed two years earlier. In this work, de Silva is dressed in low cut Maja clothing. She probably agreed to this depiction in that it might show her as a "woman of the people".

'}
1221 Avenue of the Americas (Q172811)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

1221 Avenue of the Americas (formerly also known as the McGraw-Hill Building) is an international-style skyscraper located at 1221 Sixth Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The 51-floor structure has a seven-storey base and a simple, cuboid massing. The intentionally featureless facade offers no decoration and consists of red granite piers alternating with glass stripes to underline the tower's verticality. There is a 35-meter setback from Sixth Avenue, featuring a sunken courtyard dominated by the 15-meter abstract steel sculpture named Sun Triangle by Athelstan Spilhaus. The tower's lobby is clad in dark red terrazzo and red marble, and is also decorated with aphorisms by Plato and John F. Kennedy.

"}
110th Street (Q655136)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

110th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is commonly known as the boundary between Harlem and Central Park, along which it is known as Central Park North. In the west, between Central Park West/Frederick Douglass Boulevard and Riverside Drive, it is co-signed as Cathedral Parkway.\n

'}
Singer Building (Q651362)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Singer Building or Singer Tower was a 41-story office building in Manhattan, New York City, completed in 1908 as the headquarters of the Singer Manufacturing Company. It was located at Liberty Street and Broadway in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.\n

'}
WKCR-FM (Q14707668)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WKCR-FM (89.9 FM) is a radio station licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is currently owned by Trustees of Columbia University in New York and serves the local region.

'}
Playhouse Theatre (Q15032188)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Playhouse Theatre was a Broadway theatre located at 137 West 48th Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City. Charles A. Rich was the architect. It was built in 1911 for producer William A. Brady who also owned the nearby 48th Street Theatre. After Brady died in 1944, it was sold to the Shubert Organization. From 1949 to 1952, an ABC Radio studio. \n

'}
PS 158 (Q15032112)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

[1]

'}
Rattlestick Playwrights Theater (Q15032325)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rattlestick Playwrights Theater is a non-profit off-Broadway theater based in the West Village, New York.\n

'}
The Beekman School (Q15032123)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Beekman School (originally The Tutoring School of New York) is a private high school in New York City. It was founded in 1925 by George Matthew. It primarily serves grades 9-12 .

'}
Lunatarium (Q6703862)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lunatarium was an art and music space located in a warehouse loft in DUMBO, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York City. Managed by DUMBO-based art collective Dumboluna, the Lunatarium was in operation between 2001 and 2004. In its last year of operation it moved from the top floor to the bottom floor of 10 Jay Street. Established in July 2001, Lunatarium quickly gained notoriety due to the unique nature of the space and events that took place.\n

'}
Madison Square Presbyterian Church (Q6728104)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Madison Square Presbyterian Church (demolished 1919) was a Presbyterian church in Manhattan, New York City, located on Madison Square Park at the northeast corner of East 24th Street and Madison Avenue. It was designed by Stanford White in a High Renaissance architectural style, with a prominent central dome over a cubical central space in an abbreviated Greek cross plan; it was built in 1906. The inaugural service was on October 14 of that year. The congregation\'s church had previously been located on the opposing, southeast corner of Madison and 24th Street, in a Gothic-style structure, also called the "Madison Square Presbyterian Church", whose cornerstone was laid in 1853 and which was completed the following year. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company purchased the original site for the construction of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower, a 48-story building completed in 1909 which was the world\'s tallest building when it was constructed.

'}
Majestic Theatre (Q6737715)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Majestic Theatre was a theatre located at 5 Columbus Circle, the present site of the Time Warner Center. Designed in 1903 by John H. Duncan, the architect of Grant's Tomb, it was built at a time that Columbus Circle was expected to become a theatre district. Initially, the theatre, which seated about 1355, hosted original musicals and operettas, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Toyland, and some plays. It was renamed Park Theatre in 1911, opening with The Quaker Girl, and it again presented plays, musicals and operettas. The Shuberts, Florenz Ziegfeld and Billy Minsky, in succession, owned the house but did not find success there. In 1925, it was purchased by William Randolph Hearst, renamed Cosmopolitan Theatre, and played movies as well as live theatre. During the period it was used as a playhouse, its last name was amended to include International Theatre.

"}
St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church (Q7590825)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church was a Reformed Protestant Dutch church in Midtown Manhattan, New York City that at the time of its demolition in 1949 was the oldest congregation in Manhattan. The church was located on the northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 48th Street near Rockefeller Center. The church was built in 1872 to Gothic Revival designs in brownstone by architect W. Wheeler Smith and "distinguished by an elegantly tapered spire that, according to John A. Bradley in the New York Times, \'many declare…the most beautiful in this country.\'" The congregation dated back to 1628.\n

'}
Stage Deli (Q7596782)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stage Deli, located on Seventh Avenue just two blocks from Carnegie Hall, was a well-known New York City delicatessen, patronized by numerous celebrities. It was first opened in 1937 by Russian immigrant Max Asnas. The deli was known for Broadway-themed dishes including the "Mamma Mia!" sandwich. It had other menu items named for the celebrities who have dined there, including Sarah Ferguson, Adam Sandler, Dolly Parton, Martin Short, and Ron Blomberg.

'}
Stephen Haller Gallery (Q7609411)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nThe Stephen Haller Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The gallery exhibits significant, contemporary painting and is known for presenting paintings imbued with rich textures and surfaces. Stephen Haller Gallery represents artists Michel Alexis, Kate O'Donovan Cook, Nobu Fukui, Catherine Gfeller, Johannes Girardoni, Gregory Johnston, Sam Jury, Ronnie Landfield, Lloyd Martin, Kathy Moss, Michael Mulhearn, Johnnie Winona Ross, Linda Stojak, and Larry Zox.

"}
Stuyvesant Fish House (Q7629265)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stuyvesant Fish House is a brick and limestone Italianate mansion located at 25 East 78th Street, at the corner of Madison Avenue in New York City. It was constructed for railroad executive Stuyvesant Fish and designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead and White in 1898.\n

'}
Mount Calvary United Methodist Church (Q6919965)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mount Calvary United Methodist Church is a Methodist church in Harlem Village, Manhattan, New York City at 116 Edgecombe Avenue and 140th Street. The congregation occupies the former Lutheran church building of The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Atonement, which was established in 1896 and built in 1897 as a mission church of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. When Atonement merged with the Lutheran Church of Our Saviour, Atonement's congregation moved into Our Saviour's building at 525 West 179th Street and then 580 West 187th Street.

"}
deaths of Lucia and Leo Krim (Q6937968)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lucia and Leo Krim, ages 6 and 2, respectively, were murdered in the late afternoon of October 25, 2012, at the La Rochelle apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. The children's part-time caretaker, Yoselyn Ortega, was convicted of stabbing the children to death with kitchen knives while their mother Marina Krim and three-year-old sister Nessie were a few blocks away at a swimming lesson. Upon returning home, their mother and sister found Lucia and Leo dead in a bathtub at the family apartment. Ortega then began stabbing herself repeatedly in the neck and throat. She survived the self-inflicted wounds.\n

"}
NFL Foundation (Q6953714)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Football League (NFL) Foundation, previously known as NFL Charities, is a non-profit making charitable organization, established by the member clubs of the National Football League (NFL) in 1973. It enables the clubs to collectively make grants to charitable and worthwhile causes at a national level.\n

'}
St. Nicholas Kirche (Q7590837)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Nicholas Kirche is a former Roman Catholic church located at 127 East Second Street between Avenue A and First Avenue in the Alphabet City/East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The church, known in German as Deutsche Römisch-Katholische St. Nicholas Kirche ("St. Nicholas Roman Catholic German Church"), was the national parish for the local German-speaking population.\n

'}
Studebaker Building, Manhattan (Q7627543)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Studebaker Building is a former structure at 1600 Broadway on the northeast corner at 48th Street in Manhattan, New York City. It was erected by the Juilliard Estate, in 1902, between Broadway and 7th Avenue, in the area north of Times Square. It was demolished in 2004 to make room for an apartment tower, a twenty- five story, 136 unit, luxury condominium designed by architect Einhorn Yaffee Prescott.

'}
Stuyvesant Street (Q7629278)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Stuyvesant Street is one of the oldest streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs diagonally from 9th Street at Third Avenue to 10th Street near Second Avenue, all within the East Village, Manhattan neighborhood. The majority of the street is included in the St. Mark's Historic District.\n

"}
Minnesota Strip (Q6868568)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Minnesota Strip is an archaic name for an area in Manhattan comprising Eighth Avenue between 42nd Street and 57th Street. It is now part of Hell's Kitchen.\n

"}
Morgans Hotel (Q6911961)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Morgans Hotel was a boutique hotel located on Madison Avenue, New York City, USA. Owned by Morgans Hotel Group, this was the first property in the group and opened in 1984. Andrée Putman served as interior designer for the 1984 renovation of this 1927 structure.

'}
Mortimer Building (Q6914710)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Mortimer Building was a 19th-century edifice located at Wall Street and New Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. It was built by W.Y. Mortimer beginning\non June 1, 1884, and completed for occupancy in March 1885. The architect was George B. Post. It fronted Wall Street for a distance of fifty-seven feet and New Street for sixty-five feet. Used entirely as an office building, the structure adjoined the stock exchange building on the west and south. Tenants included lawyers, brokers, and bankers.

'}
Morton F. Plant House (Q6914847)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Morton F. Plant House may refer to either of two mansions on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City built for Morton F. Plant. The first, at 52nd Street, was completed in 1905 and is now also known as the Cartier Building. The second, at 86th Street, was built in 1916 and is now demolished. The 52nd Street building was designated a New York City Landmark on July 14, 1970.

'}
Mount Morris Bank (Q6922286)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Mount Morris Bank Building, also referred to as the Corn Exchange Bank (Mount Morris Branch) and Corn Exchange Building, is an historic building in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, located at 81-85 East 125th Street on the northwest corner of Park Avenue. Although an architectural standout when new in 1883, by the late 1970s it was vacant, and remained so for three decades, vandalized and deteriorating. In 2009 the city demolished, for safety, most of what remained after a 1997 fire, but in 2012 a developer undertook to rebuild it for commercial occupancy, and the building reöpened in May 2015.\n

'}
Mrs. William B. Astor House (Q6929913)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Mrs. William B. Astor House was a large mansion located on 840 Fifth Avenue, in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, which stood roughly between 1893-1927.\n

'}
Museum of Modern Art Department of Film (Q6940948)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of Modern Art Department of Film, based in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, United States, and founded in 1935, contains works of international cinema, focusing on the art and history of the film medium. The collection comprises more than 22,000 films and 4 million film stills.\n

'}
Museum of Motherhood (Q6940955)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of Motherhood, also known as M.O.M, was conceived in 2003 and first opened to the public on Main St. in Dobbs Ferry, NY with a small exhibition gallery. The focus of the museum is to explore and understand American mothers, fathers, and families. M.O.M. was founded under the non-profit Motherhood Foundation Inc. 501c3, and has participated in events throughout New York state, including a village-wide display called "The Moms of Rock" in Seneca Falls, home of the Suffragette Movement (2010), as well as family activities each year at the Museum Mile Festival in New York City.\n

'}
National Theater (Q6978912)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Theater was a Yiddish theatre at the southwest corner of Second Avenue (Chrystie) and Houston Street in the Yiddish Theater District in Manhattan, New York City, United States. When first built it was leased to Boris Thomashefsky and Julius Adler. Its grand opening as the Adler-Thomashefsky National Theatre was on September\xa024, 1912.

'}
New Century Theatre (Q7006506)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New Century Theatre was a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 932 Seventh Avenue at West 58th Street in midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
Rainforest Alliance (Q2034373)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Rainforest Alliance is an international non-governmental organization (NGO) based in New York City and Amsterdam, with offices throughout the world and operations in more than 60 countries. It was founded in 1987 by Daniel Katz, who serves on its board of directors, and is currently led by CEO Han de Groot. Its main work is the provision of an environmental certification on sustainable forestry and agriculture and tourism. Its certificate seal gives information to consumers about business practices, based on certain standards they set.

'}
Museum of the Peaceful Arts (Q6941111)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of the Peaceful Arts was a museum in Manhattan, New York City. Established at 24 West 40th St. around 1920, it was later relocated to the Daily News Building at 220 E. 42nd St. It was later closed, and superseded by the New York Museum of Science and Industry.\n

'}
National Dance Institute (Q6972111)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

National Dance Institute (NDI) was founded in 1976 by New York City Ballet principal dancer Jacques d'Amboise.\n

"}
St. Nicholas Historic District (Q7590831)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Nicholas Historic District, known colloquially as "Striver\'s Row", is a historic district located on both sides of West 138th and West 139th Streets between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (Seventh Avenue) and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (Eighth Avenue) in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is both a national and a New York City district, and consists of row houses and associated buildings designed by architects and built in 1891–93 by developer David H. King, Jr. These are collectively recognized as gems of New York City architecture, and "an outstanding example of late 19th-century urban design":

'}
St. Nicholas Rink (Q7590843)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Nicholas Rink, also called the St. Nicholas Arena, was an indoor ice rink, and later a boxing arena in New York, New York, from 1896 until 1962. The rink was one of the earliest indoor ice rinks made of mechanically frozen ice in North America, (others including the North Avenue Ice Palace in Baltimore, Maryland and the Ice Palace in New York, both opened in 1894), enabling a longer season for skating sports. It was demolished in the 1980s.\n

'}
St. Rose of Lima's Old Church (Q7591635)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Church of St. Rose of Lima is a former Roman Catholic parish church which was under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 36 Cannon Street between Broome Street and Delancey Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The rectory was located at 42 Cannon Street; the school was located at 290 Delancey Street. The 1871 church was described by The New York Times when it opened in 1871, as one of the finest churches in the city. The church was demolished around July 1901 and the site redeveloped in conjunction with the erection of the Williamsburg Bridge (1903) and public housing. A new church was begun shortly after property was purchased in July 1900 at Grand and Lewis Streets. The parish closed in the 1960s.\n

'}
Staley-Wise Gallery (Q7597231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nStaley-Wise Gallery is a fine art photography gallery located in New York City, focusing on the masters of fashion photography, as well as portraiture, landscape, still life and nudes. The gallery was founded in 1981 by Etheleen Staley and Taki Wise.\n

'}
Monk's Café (Q6900572)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Monk's Café is a fictional coffee shop from the NBC sitcom Seinfeld.\n

"}
Monkdogz Urban Art (Q6900668)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nMonkdogz Urban Art is an art gallery in Chelsea, an art district of New York City.\n

'}
Morningside Drive (Q6912985)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Morningside Drive is a roughly north–south bi-directional street in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs from 110th Street in the south, where it forms the continuation of Columbus Avenue, to 122nd Street-Seminary Row in the north, which Morningside Drive becomes after turning to the west and crossing over Amsterdam Avenue.\n

'}
Morosco Theatre (Q6913281)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Morosco Theatre was a Broadway theatre near Times Square in New York City from 1917 to 1982. It housed many notable productions and its demolition, along with four adjacent theaters, was controversial.

'}
National Medical Fellowships (Q6974294)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

National Medical Fellowships, Inc. (NMF) is a nonprofit organization that provides scholarships and support for underrepresented minority students in medicine and the health professions. Since its inception in 1946, National Medical Fellowships has provided over $40 million to upward of 30,000 minority community members. NMF's goal is to identify and nurture tomorrow's diverse healthcare leaders, who have the knowledge, skills and cultural competence to achieve health equity. \n

"}
Overseas Press Club (Q2042418)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) was founded in 1939 in New York City by a group of foreign correspondents. The wire service reporter Carol Weld was a founding member, as was war correspondent Peggy Hull. The club seeks to maintain an international association of journalists working in the United States and abroad, to encourage the highest standards of professional integrity and skill in the reporting of news, to help educate a new generation of journalists, to contribute to the freedom and independence of journalists and the press throughout the world, and to work toward better communication and understanding among people. The organization has approximately 500 members who are media industry leaders.\n

'}
Mink Building (Q6867792)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Mink Building is a five-story German-American style red brick structure at 1361-1369 Amsterdam Avenue between 126th and 128th Streets, in the Manhattanville neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, originally part of a large brewery complex. It is one of a few buildings that remain of a vast beer brewing industry in this area in the late 19th century, beer brewing was an industry as big as finance or real estate in the 21st century New York City. The site of the complex at 1361 Amsterdam Avenue in Manhattan - predating residential development in Harlem - was chosen due to its relative isolation at the time. \n

'}
Mulberry Bend (Q6933796)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mulberry Bend was an area surrounding a curve on Mulberry Street, in the notorious Five Points neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It is located in what is now Chinatown in Manhattan.\n

'}
Vanderbilt Theatre (Q7914450)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Vanderbilt Theatre was a New York City Broadway theatre, designed by architect Eugene De Rosa for producer Lyle Andrews. It opened in 1918, located at 148 West 48th Street. The theatre was demolished in 1954.\n

'}
National Shakespeare Conservatory (Q6978408)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The National Shakespeare Conservatory was an acting school in New York City, offering a two-year certificate program and an eight-week summer training program. The Conservatory was founded in 1974 by Philip Meister, Albert Schoemann and Mario Siletti.

'}
New Amsterdam Plein and Pavilion (Q7005337)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New Amsterdam Plein and Pavilion, designed by Ben van Berkel and Caroline Bos of UNStudio, with the architect of record being Handel Architects of New York, is a gift from the Netherlands to New York City in honor of the 400th Anniversary in 2009 of Henry Hudson’s arrival in New York Harbor. It was completed in 2011.

'}
New Heights Academy Charter School (Q7008624)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New Heights Academy Charter School (M353) is a charter school in Harlem, New York City, New York for grades 5 - 12, located at 1818 Amsterdam Avenue. It is within the New York City Department of Education.\n

'}
New St. Marks Baths (Q7011931)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New St. Marks Baths was a gay bathhouse at 6 St. Marks Place in the East Village of Manhattan, New York City from 1979 to 1985. It claimed to be the largest gay bath house in the world.

'}
Liberty Street (Q2568224)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Liberty Street is a street in New York City that stretches east-west from the middle of Lower Manhattan almost to the East River. It borders such sites as One Chase Manhattan Plaza, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Building, 140 Broadway, One Liberty Plaza, Liberty Plaza Park, the World Trade Center, Brookfield Place, Gateway Plaza, Liberty Park, and the North Cove marina. A FDNY Firehouse, Engine Company 10 and Ladder Company 10, is located at 124 Liberty Street, directly across from the World Trade Center.

'}
Hebrew Technical Institute (Q5695876)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hebrew Technical Institute was a vocational High School in New York City. The school was founded on January 7, 1884 and closed in 1939.

'}
Universal Hotel (Q7893977)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Universal Hotel may refer to three different establishments of the late 19th century and early 20th century Manhattan, New York. There was a Universal Hotel at 352 Bowery. Another lodging, called Morgan's Universal Hotel, operated in New York City\nduring the 1890s. It was located 75 Clarkson Street, currently the address of Mystique Gentleman's Club. A third establishment named Universal Hotel was located at 6th Avenue (Manhattan) and the northwest corner of 28th Street (Manhattan). It was altered\nin 1909, expanding to a five-story hotel and store. The alteration was performed by architect B.W. Devitan, at a cost of $15,000.

"}
Van Tassell and Kearney Horse Auction Mart (Q7913699)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Van Tassell and Kearney Horse Auction Mart is located in New York, New York. The building was constructed in 1903-04 to the designs of Jardine, Kent & Jardine in the Beaux-Arts Style. It originally served as a horse auction mart that catered to New York's elite families, including the Vanderbilts and Delanos. Each Tuesday and Friday, Van Tassell & Kearney held auctions in the building. Though carriages remained an important part of the business, most advertisements and newspaper stories about the mart concerned the sale of horses, particularly high-priced ribbon winners, polo ponies, hunters, and thoroughbreds. Other sales were devoted to breeding stock and coach horses, including a large group of horses co-owned by Alfred W. Vanderbilt and Robert L. Gerry in 1906.

"}
WEPN-FM (Q7949008)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WEPN-FM (98.7\xa0MHz) branded as "ESPN New York 98.7 FM", is an all-sports radio station licensed to New York City. The station is owned by Emmis Communications and its operations are controlled by the Walt Disney Company, ESPN Radio\'s majority owner, under a local marketing agreement. The station has its studios on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, and its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

'}
Herald Square Theatre (Q5732648)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Herald Square Theatre was a Broadway theatre in Manhattan, New York City, built in 1883 and closed in 1914. The site is now a highrise designed by H. Craig Severance.

'}
Union Square Cafe (Q7886046)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Union Square Cafe is an American restaurant featuring New American cuisine, located at 101 E 19th St (between Park Avenue South and Irving Place), in the Union Square neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York. It is owned by the Union Square Hospitality Group.

'}
United States Post Office Knickerbocker Station (Q7891148)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The United States Post Office Knickerbocker Station, originally known as "Station B", is a historic post office building located on East Broadway in Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1935–37, and designed by consulting architect William Dewey Foster for the Office of the Supervising Architect of the United States Department of the Treasury. The building is a two to three story, brick building with a mansard roof and granite trim in the Colonial Revival style. The main entrance features a three bay wide pavilion topped by a pediment.

'}
Urban Academy Laboratory High School (Q7899839)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Urban Academy Laboratory High School (also known as the Urban Academy) is a small, progressive, transfer public high school located on the Upper East Side of New York City. Founded in 1986, its goal was to create a place where students could learn in a nontraditional sense. In 1995, it became one of six small schools located in the Julia Richman Education Complex.\n

'}
Victoria Theater (Q7927082)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Victoria Theater is a theater located on 125th Street in the Harlem neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It was designed in 1917 by Thomas W. Lamb, a notable and prolific theater architect of the era, for the Loew's Corporation.

"}
Village Zendo (Q7930700)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Village Zendo is a combined Soto and Rinzai Zen practice center located in downtown Manhattan. Originally located in the apartment of Enkyo Pat O'Hara, who founded the zendo in 1986, the Zen center took up the majority of space in O'Hara's apartment. Village Zendo is a practice center of the White Plum Asanga and Zen Peacemaker Circle, the former founded by O'Hara's teacher Taizan Maezumi and the latter by Bernard Glassman.

"}
WFUT-DT (Q7949569)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WFUT-DT, virtual channel 68 (UHF digital channel 26), is a Spanish-language television station licensed to Newark, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. It is one of two East Coast flagship stations of the UniMás network (alongside WAMI-DT in Miami–Fort Lauderdale, Florida). WFUT-DT is owned by the Univision Local Media subsidiary of Univision Communications, as part of a de facto triopoly with Paterson, New Jersey-licensed Univision co-flagship WXTV-DT (channel 41) and Smithtown, New York-licensed Justice Network affiliate WFTY-DT (channel 67). The three stations share studios on Frank W. Burr Boulevard in Teaneck, New Jersey; WFUT and WXTV share transmitter facilities at the Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan.\t\n

'}
WMBQ-CD (Q7952672)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WMBQ-CD virtual channel 46 VHF digital channel 13, is a Class A low-power digital television station licensed to New York City. Owned by WNET.org, the station is sister to the city's two PBS member stations, Newark, New Jersey-licensed WNET (channel 13) and Garden City, New York-licensed WLIW (channel 21), and a Class A station which, like WMBQ-CD, shares spectrum with WNET: WNDT-CD (channel 14). The station's transmitter facilities are located at One World Trade Center.\n

"}
Hendrik Hudson Hotel (Q5713887)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hendrik Hudson, formally known as the Hendrik Hudson Residence Hotel, is a Tuscan-style apartment building located on Riverside Drive in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City. The first plans for a building named for Hendrik Hudson on Riverside Drive were announced in October 1897 by Eugene Kirby, a former manager of the Marie Antoinette Hotel. This was to be an 18-story hotel. These plans were never completed, however, and by 1907, an apartment building bearing the name had been constructed instead.

'}
United Charities Building (Q7887567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The United Charities Building, also known as United Charities Building Complex, at 105 East 22nd Street or 287 Park Avenue South, in the Gramercy Park neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, near the border of the Flatiron District, was built in 1893 by John Stewart Kennedy, a wealthy banker, for the Charity Organization Society. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1991 for the role played by the Charity Organization Society played in promoting progressive social welfare policies, including the development of academic disciplines in that area.

'}
University Place (Q7894878)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

University Place is a short north–south thoroughfare in Manhattan, New York City, which runs from Washington Square Park in the south as a continuation of Washington Square East, taking the position of Madison Avenue uptown, and terminates at East 14th Street just southwest of Union Square. Although the roadway continues north of 14th Street as Union Square West, traffic on the two streets run in opposite directions (University Place uptown, and Union Square West downtown), both feeding into 14th Street. Until the late 1990s, University Place was a two-way street. The street contains numerous shops and restaurants, many of which cater to students at NYU and The New School.\n

'}
Urban Center (Q7899870)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Urban Center is a gallery on Madison Avenue in manhattan, New York City which is run by the Municipal Art Society (MAS). The gallery serves to champion the fields of urban planning and design in New York, and is also the site of MAS' community development workshops, seminars, lectures, and other educational programs. The Urban Center also includes a book store which specializes in architecture, urban planning, urban design, and environmental studies.

"}
Veruka (Q7922986)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Veruka was a nightclub in Manhattan, owned by Noel Ashman. The club operated between January 1997 and June 2004, and was known for its strict door policy and celebrity patrons.\n

'}
WBLS (Q7947274)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WBLS (107.5 MHz) is an urban adult contemporary formatted FM radio station, licensed to New York City. It is currently owned by Mediaco Holding and operated by Emmis Communications under a shared services agreement, along with sister stations WLIB (1190 AM) and WQHT (97.1 FM). The three stations share studios in the Hudson Square neighborhood of Manhattan, and WBLS' transmitter is located at the Empire State Building. It was previously owned by YMF Media LLC, owned jointly by investor Ronald Burkle and Magic Johnson, which had assumed control of WBLS and WLIB's former parent company, Inner City Broadcasting Corporation, on October 19, 2012 at a purchase price of $180 million.

"}
Henry Street (Q5728794)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Henry Street is a street in the Lower East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs one-way eastbound, except for two small two-way segments west of Pike Street and east of Montgomery Street. It spans from Oliver Street in the west (locally called "south" because it is towards downtown), passing underneath the Manhattan Bridge and on to Grand Street in the east ("north"). The street is named for Henry Rutgers, a hero of the American Revolutionary War and prominent philanthropist. Rutgers Street, which intersects with Henry Street, is also named for him.\n

'}
Hernandez Houses (Q5742170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rafael Hernandez Houses, also known as Hernandez Houses, is a public housing development built and maintained by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

'}
Hewitt School (Q5748520)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hewitt School is an all girls independent K-12 school in New York City, New York. The school serves girls in three divisions: Lower School (K-4), Middle School (5-8), and Upper School (9-12).\n

'}
High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College (Q5756594)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College (often abbreviated to High School for Math, Science and Engineering, HSMSE, or HSMSE @ CCNY) is one of the nine specialized high schools in New York City, United States. It caters to highly gifted students from across the city. It is located within the campus of the City College of New York (CCNY).\n

'}
High School of Fashion Industries (Q5756627)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

High School of Fashion Industries (HSFI) is a secondary school located in Manhattan, New York City, New York. HSFI serves grades 9 through 12 and is a part of the New York City Department of Education. HSFI has magnet programs related to fashion design, fashion art, marketing and visual merchandising, graphics and illustration and photography.\n

'}
Highbridge Reservoir (Q5757847)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Highbridge Reservoir was a reservoir in the New York City water supply system, which received water from a portion of the Croton Aqueduct system. It was located on Amsterdam Avenue between 172nd Street and 174th Street, in Upper Manhattan adjacent to the High Bridge Water Tower and the High Bridge across the Harlem River Valley. The reservoir covered about 7 acres (28,000\xa0m2), was 16 feet (4.9\xa0m) deep, and had a total capacity of 10,794,000 US gallons (40,860,000\xa0L).

'}
Union Square Theatre (Q7886049)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Union Square Theatre was the name of two different theatres near Union Square, Manhattan, New York City. The first was a Broadway theatre that opened in 1870, was converted into a cinema in 1921 and closed in 1936. The second was an Off-Broadway theatre that opened in 1985 and closed in 2016.\n

'}
University Club of New York (Q7894605)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The University Club of New York (also known as University Club or UClub) is a private social club located at 1 West 54th Street at Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York. It received its charter in 1865, but the origins date back to the autumn of 1861 when a group of college friends, principally Yale alumni, founded the club hoping to extend their collegial ties. The club is not affiliated with any other University Club or college alumni clubs. The club is considered one of the most prestigious in New York City\n

'}
Vera Institute of Justice (Q7920786)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Vera Institute of Justice, founded in 1961, is an independent nonprofit national research and policy organization in the United States. Based primarily in New York City, Vera also has offices in Washington, D.C.. Vera describes its goal as "to tackle the most pressing injustices of our day: from the causes and consequences of mass incarceration, racial disparities, and the loss of public trust in law enforcement, to the unmet needs of the vulnerable, the marginalized, and those harmed by crime and violence."

'}
W41DO-D (Q7946205)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

W41DO-D is a low-power television station licensed in New York, New York, United States. It is owned by Ventana Television, a subsidiary of Home Shopping Network which holds its TV broadcast licenses. This station is a digital LPTV translator relaying HSN2.\n

'}
Twilo (Q7858049)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Twilo was an American nightclub in operation from 1995 to 2001 in New York City and from 2006 to 2007 in Miami. The New York location at 530 West 27th Street in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan regularly attracted a crowd of thousands to its warehouse-like dance floor. Playing host to dozens of legendary DJs from around the world, the club was important in popularizing international styles of house and trance music within the United States.\n

'}
Ubu Repertory Theater (Q7876598)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Ubu Repertory Theater is the only US theater dedicated to presenting French-language plays both in English and French productions. The Ubu Repertory Theater provides Americans with a unique perspective into the world of Francophone cultures: the French-speaking European countries, as well as the ones located in North America, Africa, and the Caribbean islands.\n

'}
Village Community School (Q7930630)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Village Community School is an independent co-educational day school for grades K-8 located in Greenwich Village of New York City, USA. Village Community School or VCS is a member of the Downtown Independent School Community and the New York State Association of Independent Schools NYSAIS. Village Community School develops self-motivated students who value the challenging and rewarding process of learning as an integral part of life. VCS chooses to be a diverse community where equity, creativity, and critical thinking are essential to the rigorous education provided. Graduates are skilled and confident, able to advocate for themselves and others. 22-25% of its families receive tuition assistance; and over 21% of the school’s families are racially diverse. VCS was mentioned by The New York City Private Schools Blog for its inter-aged groupings, primary experiences, attention to artistry and craftsmanship and commitment to diversity.

'}
WBAR (Q7946974)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

"WBAR" is the college radio station of Barnard College in New York City. Currently airing online-only, WBAR was developed as a freeform alternative to WKCR-FM on the Columbia University campus. In addition to broadcasting an array of shows, WBAR hosts several live concerts per year in Morningside Heights, including the WBAR-B-Q, a free, all-ages, day-long showcase of bands and food, as well as a Winter Formal concert event in December. Recent performers have included Palehound, Japanese Breakfast, Sammus, Ravyn Lenae, and more.\n

'}
WKTU (Q7951963)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WKTU (103.5 FM) – branded "103.5 KTU" – is a Rhythmic Hot AC formatted radio station licensed to Lake Success, New York, a suburb of New York City. WKTU is owned by iHeartMedia and broadcasts from studios in the former AT&T Building in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan; its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

'}
W. O. Decker (Q7945853)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The W. O. Decker is a 52 foot wooden tugboat built in Long Island City in 1930 as the Russell I for the Newtown Creek Towing Company. The Decker tugboat company on Staten Island bought and renamed the boat in 1946. She was originally steam powered before being refitted with a 175\xa0hp diesel engine. In 1986, she was donated to the South Street Seaport Museum in Manhattan, where she remains today under restoration. She was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 13, 1996.\n

'}
WCBS-FM (Q7947634)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WCBS-FM (101.1 FM) is a radio station offering a classic hits format licensed to New York City and is owned and operated by Entercom. The station's studios are in the combined Entercom facility in the Hudson Square neighborhood of Manhattan, and its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building. The station is the home of the Scott Shannon in the Morning show.\n

"}
WMUN-CD (Q7953131)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WMUN-CD was a class A station license in New York. It operated on digital channel 45, airing infomercials.\n

'}
WNDT-CD (Q7948722)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNDT-CD, virtual channel 14 (VHF digital channel 12), is a Class A First Nations Experience (FNX)-affiliated television station licensed to New York, New York, United States. Owned by WNET.org, it is sister to the city's two PBS member stations—Newark, New Jersey-licensed WNET (channel 13) and Garden City, New York-licensed WLIW (channel 21)—and Class A station WMBQ-CD (channel 46). \n

"}
Yorkville Bank Building (Q17184215)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Yorkville Bank Building at 201–203 East 85th Street, 1511–1515 Third Avenue, Manhattan, New York City, was designed by Robert Maynicke. An example of Renaissance Revival architecture, it was built for the Yorkville Bank in 1905 and was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 2012.

'}
Central Park Casino (Q17515315)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Central Park Casino, originally the Ladies\' Refreshment Salon, was a restaurant in Central Park, near East 72nd Street in Manhattan, New York City. The name of the building came from the Italian for "little house"; the Casino itself was not a gambling business.

'}
Columbian Academy of Painting (Q17747159)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Columbian Academy of Painting was one of the earliest art schools in the United States. It was founded by brothers Archibald and Alexander Robertson in 1792. The school was located in New York at 79 Liberty Street.

'}
General Philip Henry Sheridan (Q18148542)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

General Philip Henry Sheridan, also known as the Sheridan Memorial, is an outdoor bronze sculpture of Philip Sheridan by Joseph Pollia, located in Christopher Park in Manhattan, New York. The statue was installed in 1936.

'}
Hess triangle (Q18148743)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hess triangle is a triangular tile mosaic set in a sidewalk in New York City\'s West Village neighborhood at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Christopher Street. The plaque reads "Property of the Hess Estate which has never been dedicated for public purposes." The plaque is an isosceles triangle, with a 25\xa012-inch (65\xa0cm) base and 27\xa012-inch (70\xa0cm) legs (sides).

'}
Trude Heller's (Q18157270)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Trude Heller's was a club in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York City and located at 6th Avenue and West 9th Street and operated from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. It has been described as the only truly “in” spot in Greenwich Village. Some of the acts that got their starts there were Duane and Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers, Cyndi Lauper, and the Manhattan Transfer.

"}
BooksActually (Q18359046)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

BooksActually is an independent bookstore located in Singapore's Tiong Bahru district.\n

"}
Hills Learning (Q18357862)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hills Learning is an Asian language school in New York City. It is located near Grand Central Terminal and has been recognized by several television stations, websites, and publications, such as PBS, TBS, CBS New York, The Epoch Times, and Chopsticks NY.\n

'}
330 Hudson (Q18619097)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

330 Hudson is a building located at 330 Hudson Street, in the Hudson Square neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Plans for developing the building began in 2011 when landlord Trinity Real Estate signed a 99-year lease agreement with Beacon Capital Partners. The agreement sought to transform the building into a 350,000-square-foot finished office space, retail space at the base, attracting a variety of commercial tenants. The plans included restoration of the façade of the existing eight-story building and creation of a new eight-story addition.

'}
Union Square Drinking Fountain (Q18159006)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Union Square Drinking Fountain, also known as James Fountain, is an outdoor bronze sculpture and ornamental fountain by sculptor Karl Adolph Dondorff and architect J. Leonard Corning, located on the west side of Union Square Park in Manhattan, New York City. Cast in 1881 and dedicated on October 25, 1881, it was donated by Daniel Willis James "to promote public health as well as the virtue of charity". The statuary group includes a standing woman holding a baby in her right arm and a young child at her left side. They are set on an octagonal Swedish red granite pedestal with lion head fountains and basins on four of the sides.

'}
Millennium Tower (Q18619416)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Millennium Tower is a mixed-use building in New York City. With the address of 101 West 67th Street, the building occupies the full block bounded by Broadway, Columbus Avenue, and 67th and 68th Streets. It was erected in 1994 and is one of a trio of buildings by Millennium Partners known collectively as Lincoln Square. The building was designed by James Carpenter.

'}
death of John Lennon (Q2341090)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On the evening of 8 December 1980, English musician John Lennon, formerly of the Beatles, was fatally shot in the archway of the Dakota, his residence in New York City. The perpetrator was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan who had travelled from Hawaii. Chapman stated that he was angered by Lennon\'s lifestyle and public statements, especially his much-publicized remark about the Beatles being "more popular than Jesus" and the lyrics of his later songs "God" and "Imagine". Chapman also said he was inspired by the fictional character Holden Caulfield from J. D. Salinger\'s novel The Catcher in the Rye.\n

'}
Paradise Garage (Q2339843)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Paradise Garage, also known as "the Garage" or the "Gay-rage", was a discotheque in New York City notable in the history of modern dance and pop music, as well as LGBT and nightclub cultures. It was founded by Michael Brody, its sole proprietor, and was located at 84 King Street in the SoHo neighborhood. It operated from 1977 to 1987 and was the base for resident DJ Larry Levan.

'}
Partisan Defense Committee (Q17013513)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Partisan Defense Committee describes itself as "a class-struggle, non-sectarian legal and social defense organization that champions cases and causes in the interests of the whole of the working people." The PDC works in accordance with the political orientation of the Spartacist League. The committee organizes demonstrations and performs legal work in defense of "class struggle" prisoners. Its longest standing campaign has been in defense of Mumia Abu-Jamal.\n

'}
Columbia Theatre (Q17150055)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Columbia Theatre was an American burlesque theatre on Seventh Avenue in New York, adjacent to Times Square, operated by the Columbia Amusement Company between 1910 and 1927. It specialized in "clean", family-oriented burlesque, similar to vaudeville. Many stars of the legitimate theater or of films were discovered at the Columbia. With loss of audiences to cinema and stock burlesque, the owners began to offer slightly more risqué material from 1925. The theater was closed in 1927, renovated and reopened in 1930 as a cinema called the Mayfair Theatre. It went through various subsequent changes and was later renamed the DeMille Theatre. Nothing is left of the interior.\n

'}
Theatre on Film and Tape Archive (Q17145833)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Theatre on Film and Tape Archive (TOFT), a collection within the Billy Rose Theatre Division of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, produces video recordings of New York and regional theater productions, and provides research access at its Lucille Lortel screening room. The core of the collection consists of live recordings of Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, with some additional productions from professional regional theaters. The Archive also records interviews and dialogues with notable theater professionals.\n

'}
New York Watercolor Club (Q17841477)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Watercolor Club (NYWC) was founded in New York City in 1890 as the New York Water Color Club, that accepted men and women artists as members and officers. It merged with the American Watercolor Society in 1941.

'}
WHTZ (Q2355524)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WHTZ (100.3 FM) – branded Z100 – is a commercial Top 40 (CHR) radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and broadcasting to the New York metropolitan area. Owned by iHeartMedia, WHTZ is the flagship station for Elvis Duran and the Morning Show. The WHTZ studios are located at the former AT&T Building in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan, while the station's transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

"}
Mark Fisher Fitness (Q17143519)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Mark Fisher Fitness (MFF) is a boutique fitness center located in the Hell's Kitchen area of New York City. MFF offers classes, semi-private training, nutrition counseling and life coaching.\n

"}
USS Maine National Monument (Q17198579)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The USS Maine National Monument is an outdoor monument located at the Merchants' Gate entrance to Central Park, at Columbus Circle, in Manhattan, New York City. It was cast on September 1, 1912 and dedicated on May 30, 1913 to the men killed aboard USS\xa0Maine\xa0(ACR-1) when the ship exploded in Havana harbor.

"}
Pearl Street (Q2356321)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Pearl Street is a street in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan, running northeast from Battery Park to the Brooklyn Bridge with an interruption at Fulton Street, where Pearl Street's alignment west of Fulton Street shifts one block south of its alignment east of Fulton Street, then turning west and terminating at Centre Street.\n

"}
Relay Graduate School of Education (Q17027576)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Relay Graduate School of Education is a private graduate school for teachers in New York City and other cities across the nation. It was established in 2011 after being spun off from Hunter College's Teacher U program. It is the first stand-alone graduate school of education to open in New York since Bank Street College of Education was founded in 1916.\n

"}
William Cullen Bryant Memorial (Q17300112)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William Cullen Bryant Memorial is an outdoor sculpture of William Cullen Bryant, located at Bryant Park in Manhattan, New York. The bronze statue was created by Herbert Adams and installed in 1911, the year the New York Public Library Main Branch building was completed.

'}
Manhattan Avenue (Q17347126)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Not included in the original Commissioners' Plan of 1811, Manhattan Avenue in Manhattan Valley lies between Columbus Avenue (9th Ave.) and Central Park West/Frederick Douglass Boulevard (8th Ave.), extending from 100th Street to 124th Street, at which point it merges with St. Nicholas Avenue. It saw its first buildings in 1885, a group of row houses on its western side. These buildings were brick with stone and terra-cotta trim. The now defunct New York Cancer Hospital, a landmark since 1976, is nearby on Central Park West.\n

"}
Little Syria (Q2335153)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n

'}
Strivers' Row (Q2356475)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The St. Nicholas Historic District, known colloquially as "Striver\'s Row", is a historic district located on both sides of West 138th and West 139th Streets between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (Seventh Avenue) and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (Eighth Avenue) in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is both a national and a New York City district, and consists of row houses and associated buildings designed by three architectural firms and built in 1891–93 by developer David H. King, Jr. These are collectively recognized as gems of New York City architecture, and "an outstanding example of late 19th-century urban design":

'}
Paradise Roof Garden (Q17065500)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hammerstein's Roof Garden (1899–1915) was the official name the semi-outdoor vaudeville venue that theatre magnate, Oscar Hammerstein I, built atop the Victoria Theatre and the neighboring Theatre Republic, commonly known then as the Belasco Theatre. Unlike Hammerstein’s first roof garden theatre, which crowned his failed Olympia Theatre, the Paradise Roof Garden was able to rise to prominence and contend with its rivals for the better parts of two decades. For New York City theatre-goers, the name Hammerstein’s grew to encompass both the Victoria and its roof garden.\nFrom 1904 to 1914 it was run by Willie Hammerstein, who put on highly popular vaudeville acts.

"}
Incubator Arts Project (Q17182901)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Incubator Arts Project was an Off-Off-Broadway theater located above St. Mark's Church-in-the-Bowery in the East Village of Manhattan, New York City.\n

"}
Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery (Q17380415)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery is a contemporary art gallery on Ludlow Street in the Lower East Side neighborhood of New York City.

'}
Eternal Light Flagstaff (Q17509630)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Eternal Light Flagstaff is a memorial monument located in Madison Square Park in Manhattan, New York City which was dedicated on Armistice Day, November 11, 1923 and commemorates the return to the United States of members of the United States armed forces who fought in World War I, who were officially received by the city on that site in 1918. It was designed by architect Thomas Hastings of Carrère and Hastings, and consists of a flagstaff and a sculpture by Paul Wayland Bartlett. The memorial was commissioned by department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker and cost $25,000 to construct. It was completed in 1924.

'}
Lovelace Tavern (Q18127533)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Lovelace Tavern was a bar located in what is now the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. Owned by the then-governor of New York colony, Colonel Francis Lovelace, it was in business from 1670 until 1706. The building's remains were discovered in 1979, when construction for present-day 85 Broad Street was taking place. The building burned down in 1706, but the original foundation walls can be seen today through glass set into the sidewalk. \n

"}
Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden (Q5378852)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden was built in 1958 as part of the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine at New York University Medical Center. It provides horticultural therapy for patients, but is also open to the public. It is contained in a 17,000-square-foot (1,600\xa0m2) greenhouse at 34th Street and First Avenue in New York City. The garden was a gift from Enid A. Haupt.\n

'}
Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist (Q5447490)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist is an historic Classical Revival-style Christian Science church building located at 9 East 43rd Street near Madison Avenue and Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1921 on the former site of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church. Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist, is unusual in that it occupies part of the first two stories of a 21-story office building that was originally named the Canadian Pacific Building. The church auditorium seats 1800 people.

"}
Ogden Mills House (Q7079931)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Ogden Mills House was a former mansion located on 2 East 69th Street in the Upper East Side in New York City.\n

'}
Old Brick Church (Q7083529)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old Brick Church was the predecessor church building for the congregation of Brick Presbyterian Church, which is now located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The Old Brick Church was located on the northwest corner of Beekman and Nassau Streets, in what is now the Financial District, Manhattan. It was built 1767 by John McComb Sr., father of both the architect John McComb Jr. and the civil engineer Isaac McComb. The five-bay double-height church was rectangular in plan with a projecting square-in-plan four-stage tower (final stage setback) with a three-stage round colonnaded spire extension.\n

'}
Otto H. Kahn House (Q7109615)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Otto H. Kahn House was built between 1914 and 1918 as the New York City residence of Otto H. Kahn, a German-born financier and philanthropist. The mansion is located at 1 East 91st Street, in the Carnegie Hill section of the Upper East Side. \n

'}
Packard Business College (Q7122915)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Packard's Business College or Packard Business College was a post-secondary business college in New York City which provided a concentrated one-year education in practical business subjects, such as arithmetic, bookkeeping, penmanship, and business correspondence. The school was well respected for the quality of its graduates.

"}
Palladium (Q7127710)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Palladium (originally called the Academy of Music) was a movie theatre, concert hall, and finally nightclub in New York City. It was located on the south side of East 14th Street, between Irving Place and Third Avenue.\n

'}
Peppermint Lounge (Q7166425)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Peppermint Lounge was a popular discotheque located at 128 West 45th Street in New York City that was open from 1958 to 1965, although a new one was opened in 1980. It was the launchpad for the global Twist craze in the early 1960s. Many claim The Peppermint Lounge was also where go-go dancing originated, although this claim is subject to dispute.

'}
Palazzo Chupi (Q7126983)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Palazzo Chupi at 360 West 11th Street between Washington and West Streets in the West Village section of the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is a residential condominium building designed by artist Julian Schnabel in the style of a Venetian palazzo, built on top of a former horse stable. Schnabel uses the lower four floors, the former stable, as a studio. They also contain a parking garage, art gallery space and swimming pool.

'}
Park Cinq (Q7137686)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

785 Fifth Avenue, usually called the Park Cinq, (Park-V), is a luxury, cooperative apartment building on Fifth Avenue at the corner of 60th Street in Manhattan.\n

'}
Peanut Butter & Co. (Q7157918)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Peanut Butter & Co. is a peanut butter brand that was founded in 1998 by Lee Zalben. Zalben has stated that he began working with peanut butter due to a childhood love of it.

'}
Penny Cafeteria (Q7164352)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Penny Cafeteria was a vegetarian restaurant located at 511 Third Avenue (Manhattan) between 34th Street and 35th Street. It opened during the Great Depression, in December 1931. The establishment was opened by the Bernarr MacFadden Foundation, begun by publisher Bernarr MacFadden, in September 1930. MacFadden based the concept on a similar business he opened in the winter of 1902, located at City Hall Place. \n

'}
Our Saviour's Atonement Lutheran Church (Q7111162)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Our Saviour's Atonement Lutheran Church was a Lutheran church in Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City at 578-580 West 187th Street. The church building built 1925 to 1926 at a cost of $30,000 to designs by an architect Stoyan N. Karastoyanoff of 220 Audubon Avenue. It was demolished and there is no longer a parish of St. Luke's in New York. Before the church was completed the original Lutheran Church of Our Saviour merged with The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Atonement to become Our Saviour's Atonement Lutheran Church.The pastor at the time of construction was the Rev. Arthur E. Deitz.

"}
Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Church (Q7111022)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal was a Roman Catholic parish, a part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.\n

'}
Opportunity Charter School (Q7098587)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\n\nOpportunity Charter School is an American charter school in the Harlem neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It serves approximately 400 students in grades 6–12. It was chartered by the New York State Board of Regents in 2004. The charter school serves disabled and academically struggling students. A fight to renew its charter was won in 2011 with a two-year renewal granted and the school's website reported a five-year renewal in 2012.\n

"}
Orwasher's bakery (Q7105273)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Orwasher's Bakery is a famous breadmaking business in New York City that has been listed among the top ten bakeries in America. Also known as A. Orwasher Handmade Bread Inc. it was established in 1916 on 78th Street in the Yorkville area of the New York City borough of Manhattan and it is now one of the last vestiges of the thriving immigrant population that lived in that area around the start of the 20th century.\n

"}
Other Music (Q7108603)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Other Music was a music retail store that sold CDs, records and cassettes online and at their brick-and-mortar location in the Noho neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The store specialized in the sale of closely curated underground, rare and experimental music. \n

'}
Savoy-Plaza Hotel (Q2228209)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Savoy-Plaza Hotel was a 33-story hotel overlooking Central Park at Fifth Avenue and East 59th Street in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. It opened in 1927 and was demolished in 1965.\n

'}
Olympia Theatre (Q7088983)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Olympia Theatre (1514–16 Broadway at 44th Street), also known as Hammerstein's Olympia, was a theatre complex built by impresario Oscar Hammerstein I in Longacre Square (later Times Square), New York City, opening in 1895. It consisted of a theatre, a music hall, a concert hall, and a roof garden. It was later named the New York Theatre and Loew's New York.\n

"}
Park Avenue Viaduct (Q7137641)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Park Avenue Viaduct, also known as the Pershing Square Viaduct, is a roadway in Manhattan, New York City. It carries vehicular traffic on Park Avenue from 40th to 46th Streets around Grand Central Terminal and the MetLife Building, then through the Helmsley Building. All three buildings lie across the north–south line of the avenue. The viaduct itself is composed of two sections: a steel viaduct with two roadways from 40th to 42nd Streets, and a pair of roadways between 42nd and 46th streets. The street-level service roads of Park Avenue, which flank the viaduct between 40th and 42nd streets, are called Pershing Square.\n

'}
Park Row (Q7137986)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Park Row was a major elevated railway terminal constructed on the Manhattan side of the Brooklyn Bridge, across from New York City Hall and the IRT’s elevated City Hall station, that served as the terminal for BMT services operating over the Brooklyn Bridge Elevated Line from the BMT Fulton Street Line, BMT Myrtle Avenue Line and their feeders. Until the opening of the nearby Williamsburg Bridge to elevated train traffic in 1913, it was the only Manhattan station available for elevated trains from Brooklyn, and the only elevated station in Manhattan to be owned by a company other than the IRT or its predecessors.\n

'}
Pennsylvania Plaza (Q7164028)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pennsylvania Plaza (Penn Plaza) is the office, entertainment and hotel complex occupying and near the site of Pennsylvania Station, between 31st and 34th streets and Seventh and Eighth avenues in New York City.\n

'}
One Sutton Place South (Q7093266)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

One Sutton Place South is a 14-story, 42-unit cooperative apartment house in the East Midtown neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, overlooking the East River on Sutton Place between 56th and 57th streets. One Sutton Place South is home to diplomats and financial titans of yesteryear, Hollywood types and captains of industry.\n

'}
Park East Day School (Q7137718)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Park East Day School (officially called Rabbi Arthur Schneier Park East Day School) is a reformed Jewish day school located on the Upper East Side of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. It includes an early childhood program, an elementary school, and a middle school that graduates students after eighth grade.\n

'}
PS 11 (Q7120782)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

P.S. 11 is a public elementary school in Chelsea, Manhattan. The school offers classes ranging from preschool to the fifth grade.\n

'}
PS 185 John M. Langston (Q7120785)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
'}
TADA! Youth Theater (Q7669208)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

TADA! Youth Theater, founded in 1984 is a New York City theater company that runs several programs for children and young adults, including original mainstage productions and arts education programs.

'}
Tau (Q7688601)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Tau is a public artwork by American artist Tony Smith, located on the urban campus of Hunter College, in New York City, New York, United State. Fascinated by mathematics, biology and crystals, Smith designed Tau with geometry at its root.\n

'}
Team Gallery (Q7691494)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Team Gallery is a contemporary art gallery located in the SoHo neighborhood of New York City, with an additional project space in Venice, CA. It was founded by José Freire and Lisa Ruyter in 1996. Team has represented such artists as Ryan McGinley, Banks Violette, Cory Arcangel, Sam McKinniss, and Gardar Eide Einarsson.

'}
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation (Q7721094)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation is a New York City-based foundation founded in 1946 by chemist and investor Camille Dreyfus in honour of his brother, Henry Dreyfus. The two men invented Celanese, and Henry Dreyfus was founder and chairman of British Celanese, parent of the Celanese Corporation of America.

'}
The Center for Arts Education (Q7721881)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Center for Arts Education (CAE) is a nonprofit organization in New York City, New York, in the United States. It promotes arts education in the public schools and between 1996 and 2008 spent nearly $40 million. It claimed to have affected over 500 schools, 490,000 students, 21,000 teachers and 75,000 parents and to have supported more than 400 cultural organizations.

'}
The Center School (Q7721878)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
  • \n
'}
The Equity Project (Q7732362)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Equity Project (TEP) Charter School is a 480-student, 5th through 8th grade New York City charter middle school in the Manhattan neighborhood of Inwood.\n

'}
The Grand Madison (Q7737487)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grand Madison, originally the Brunswick Building, is a New York City designated landmark located at 225 Fifth Avenue between East 26th Street and East 27th Street in Manhattan, New York City, on the north side of Madison Square Park. The building is part of the Madison Square North Historic District, and is located in the neighborhood known as NoMad ("NOrth of MADison Square Park").\n

'}
The High School of Music & Art (Q7739610)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The High School of Music & Art, informally known as "Music & Art" (or "M&A"), was a public specialized high school located at 443-465 West 135th Street in the borough of Manhattan, New York, from 1936 until 1984. In 1961, Music & Art and the High School of Performing Arts (est. 1947) were formed into a two-campus high school. The schools fully merged in 1984 into the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & the Arts.\n

'}
Finch College (Q5449817)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Finch College was a baccalaureate women's college located in Manhattan, New York City, in the U.S. state of New York. It began as a private secondary school for girls and later developed as a liberal arts college. Finch closed in 1976.\n

"}
Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies (Q5440877)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies (FPWA) is a social services institution in United States of America. Since its inception in 1922, FPWA has sought to promote the social and economic well-being of greater New York’s most vulnerable by strengthening human service organizations and advocating for just public policies. Its first permanent home was the Church Missions House, a historic landmark located at 281 Park Avenue. In May 2015, FPWA moved its office and conference center to 40 Broad Street where it occupies the 5th Floor of the mixed use building.\n

'}
Fifth Avenue Theatre (Q5447480)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Fifth Avenue Theatre was a Broadway theatre in New York City in the United States located at 31 West 28th Street and Broadway (1185 Broadway). It was demolished in 1939.\n

'}
First Zen Institute of America (Q5454111)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The First Zen Institute of America is a Rinzai institution for laypeople established by Sokei-an in New York, New York in 1930 as the Buddhist Society of America (changing its name after World War II). The emphasis on lay practice has its roots in the history of the organization. In 1875, the Japanese Rinzai Zen master Imakita Kosen founded a Zen institute, Ryomokyo-kai, dedicated to reviving Zen in Japan by recruiting talented and educated lay people. Kosen's most celebrated disciple, Soyen Shaku, visited America in 1893 to attend the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago. In 1902 he returned to America where he lectured and taught briefly. Soyen Shaku assigned responsibility for this lay Zen institute to his heir, Sokatsu Shaku. The First Zen Institute's founder, Sokei-an, was Sokatsu's student and came to America with him in 1906 to establish a Zen community. When Sokatsu returned to Japan in 1910, Sokei-an remained to season his Zen and familiarize himself with the American character. After wandering across America and perfecting his English, Sokei-an made several trips back to Japan and in 1924 received credentials from Sokatsu as a Zen master.\n

"}
Fischbach Gallery (Q5454409)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fischbach Gallery is an art gallery in New York City. It was founded by Marilyn Cole Fischbach in 1960 at 799 Madison Avenue. The gallery in its early days became known for hosting the first significant solo exhibitions of now leading art world figures including Eva Hesse, Alex Katz and Gary Kuehn.

'}
Fordham Graduate School of Social Service (Q5468061)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service (GSS) is a United States graduate school within Fordham University, in New York City. Established in 1916, it provides instruction at three campuses in the New York City area and also offers an MSW Hybrid at Molloy College in Long Island and a fully Online MSW nationally. The school was ranked 11th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2018.

'}
Equestrian statue of Theodore Roosevelt (Q5384302)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Equestrian Statue of Theodore Roosevelt is a 1939 bronze sculpture by James Earle Fraser. It is located at the American Museum of Natural History, New York City. The equestrian statue depicts Theodore Roosevelt on horseback. Standing to either side of him are an indigenous American and an African.\n

'}
Eyebeam Art and Technology Center (Q5422747)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Eyebeam is a not-for-profit art and technology center in New York City, founded by John S. Johnson III with co-founders David S. Johnson and Roderic R. Richardson.\n

'}
Ferrara Bakery and Cafe (Q5445247)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Ferrara Bakery and Cafe was established in 1892 by Antonio Ferrara and claims to be America's first espresso bar. It is located in the heart of Little Italy, Manhattan, New York City and offers a variety of Italian delicacies that include: cakes, cookies, pastries, desserts, and gourmet specialty items. Ferrara has remained a family owned business since its inception and is operated at its original location on Grand Street by the family's fifth generation of bakers. Many of their items can also be purchased through their website and shipped throughout the United States.\n

"}
Forsyth Street (Q5470659)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Forsyth Street runs from Houston Street south to Henry Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street was named in 1817 for Lt. Colonel Benjamin Forsyth.

'}
First Street (Q5453840)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

First Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line, located at the intersection of First Street and First Avenue. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and the upper level had one track that served express trains,. The next stop to the north was Eighth Street. The next stop to the south was Rivington Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
Florence Mills House (Q5460720)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Florence Mills House is a house at 220 West 135th Street in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The house was originally believed to be the residence of Florence Mills, a leading African-American actress and entertainer during the 1920s. She lived at this address, or a similar address a few blocks away, during her most productive years from 1910 to 1927. The 220 West 135th Street building that existed in 1927 no longer stands and has been replaced. The site was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

'}
Fort Clinton, Central Park (Q5470941)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fort Clinton was a stone-and-earthworks fortification within what is now Central Park, Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1814 near the present line of 107th Street, slightly west of Fifth Avenue. According to maps of the time, Fort Clinton was the easternmost of a connected series of forts, connected to Nutter's Battery on the west by earthworks and a gatehouse over the Old Post Road at the bottom of McGowan's Pass. Fort Clinton and Nutter's Battery were commanded from a third fort at the top of the Pass, Fort Fish, which had a sweeping view of Long Island Sound, northern Manhattan, and Westchester County. Fort Fish was across the road from Fort Clinton and connected to Nutter's Battery by another line of earthworks.

"}
Fort Cockhill (Q5470944)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fort Cockhill was an 18th-century military fortification located on Cox's Hill or Tubby Hook Hill, now known as the present-day Inwood Hill Park in Manhattan, New York City. A small, circular earthwork structure, in height some ten or twelve feet and equipped with two cannon, it was situated at the northwestern extremity of Tubby Hook Hill, at a point overlooking both the Hudson River and the Harlem River valley.

"}
Fort Fish (Q5471146)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fort Fish was an earthworks fortification within what is now Central Park, Manhattan, New York City. The fort was located on East Drive near 105th Street, directly across from the Central Park Conservancy's composting area, which was once a girls' school. Currently the only memorial on the Fort Fish site is a white marble bench dedicated to the memory of Andrew Haswell Green, the 19th century educator and city planner.

"}
Environ (Q5380991)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Environ was a performance space that was influential during the Loft Jazz scene of the mid-1970s in NYC. It was located on Broadway in SOHO and close to two other noted Loft Jazz venues: RivBea and Ali's Alley. Environ was established by Chris Brubeck and Danny Brubeck sons and band mates of noted jazz musician Dave Brubeck. Environ was managed by John Fischer pianist leader of Interface with assistance by staff Mark Forman indie media producer and Brian Olewnick music blogger and reviewer for Bagatellen.\n

"}
Everett Building (Q5416984)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Everett Building is a 16-story commercial tower at 200 Park Avenue South at the northwest corner with East 17th Street, on Union Square in Manhattan, New York. It was designed by the architectural firm of Starrett & van Vleck and opened in 1908. Goldwin Starrett, the lead architect, had worked for Daniel Burnham for four years in Chicago, and as such the building reflects Burnham's functionalist philosophy. It marked the development of fireproof commercial skyscrapers with open plan interiors and simple, classical exteriors.

"}
Fifth Avenue Hotel (Q5447471)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fifth Avenue Hotel was a luxury hotel located at 200 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City from 1859 to 1908. It occupied the full Fifth Avenue frontage between 23rd Street and 24th Street, at the southwest corner of Madison Square.\n

'}
Florence Gould Hall (Q5460625)
{'lang': , 'extract': "
  • From a merge: This is a redirect from a page that was merged into another page. This redirect was kept in order to preserve this page's edit history after its content was merged into the target page's content. Please do not remove the tag that generates this text (unless the need to recreate content on this page has been demonstrated) nor delete this page.\n
    • For redirects with substantive page histories that did not result from page merges use {{R with history}} instead.
    • \n
  • \n
"}
Exit Art (Q5420387)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nExit Art was a non-profit cultural center that ran from 1982–2012 that exhibited contemporary visual art, installation, video, theater, and performance in New York City. In its last location in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, it was a two-story gallery. \n

"}
Ezras Torah Fund (Q5423439)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Ezras Torah Fund was founded on August 25, 1915 (15 Elul, 5675) at a meeting in Congregation Mishkan Israel in the Lower East Side of New York. The meeting was conducted by members of the Agudas HaRabbanim and the Vaad HaRabbanim of New York. It was an outgrowth of the Central Relief Committee (CRC) that was created to assist Orthodox Jews in Europe during World War I. The CRC had been founded in late 1914 by the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America with much help from the aforementioned rabbinical organizations. Ezras Torah's role was to specifically assist town rabbis, roshei yeshiva, and yeshivas during the upheaval years of World War I. They eventually broadened their scope to a worldwide level after the war.\n

"}
Fashion Group International (Q5436734)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fashion Group International (FGI) is a global, non-profit, professional\norganization founded in 1930 in New York City to benefit the fashion industry. FGI currently has over 5000 members in the fashion industry including apparel, accessories, beauty and home. FGI is divided into chapters in cities all over the world (Canada, Colombia, England, México, Dominican Republic Seoul), with the major chapter in New York City.\n

'}
Hotel Gerard (Q5397234)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hotel Gerard, also known as the Hotel Langwell and Hotel 1-2-3, is a historic hotel located in New York, New York. The building was designed by George Keister and built in 1893. It is a 13-story, "U"-shaped, salmon colored brick and limestone building with German Renaissance style design elements. The front facade features bowed pairs of bay windows from the third to the sixth floor and the building is topped by steeply pointed front gables and a highly decorated dormer. It was originally built as an apartment hotel.

'}
First Baptist Church in the City of New York (Q5452454)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The First Baptist Church in the City of New York is a Christian congregation based in a sanctuary built in 1890–93 at the intersection of Broadway and West 79th Street in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The church is a conservative, independent, evangelistic, mission-oriented church in fellowship with the Southern Baptist Convention.

'}
Grand Theatre (Q5595142)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grand Theatre was a theatre in the Yiddish Theatre District in Manhattan in New York City built for Yiddish productions, the first of its kind. The theater was built in 1904 by Jacob Pavlovitch Adler, a famous Russian-born Jewish actor.

'}
Great Jones Street (Q5599378)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Great Jones Street is a street in New York City's NoHo district in Manhattan, essentially another name for 3rd Street between Broadway and the Bowery.\n

"}
Green Gallery (Q5602572)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Green Gallery was an art gallery that operated between 1960 and 1965 at 15 West 57th Street in Manhattan, New York City. The gallery's director was Richard Bellamy, and its financial backer was the art collector Robert Scull. Green Gallery is noted for giving early visibility to a number of artists who soon rose to prominence, such as Yayoi Kusama, Mark di Suvero, Donald Judd, and George Segal.\n

"}
Hamilton Fish Park Pool (Q5644941)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hamilton Fish Park Pool was built by the New York City Parks Department using Works Progress Administration funds. It opened in June 1936. Located in the Lower East Side, the facility includes extensive facilities for filtering and purifying water, underwater lighting, and separate diving and wading pools. The largest pool has a main swimming area measuring 330 feet in length, with a width of 165 feet. The pool, situated at East Houston Street and Pitt Street, cost $1,000,000 to build. The park and pool are named after Hamilton Fish, a 19th-century politician who grew up in the neighborhood.\n

'}
Hamilton-Holly House (Q5644805)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Hamilton-Holly House, located at 4 St. Mark's Place in the East Village section of Manhattan, is a Federal style townhouse constructed in 1831. A designated landmark, it was the home of Eliza Hamilton, the widow of Alexander Hamilton, from 1833 to 1842. The Trash and Vaudeville fashion store was located there for over forty years ending in 2016.\n

"}
Hanover Square (Q5649423)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hanover Square was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two tracks and one island platform. The station was originally built in 1878 by the New York Elevated Railroad. The next stop to the north was Fulton Street. The next stop to the south was South Ferry. The station closed on December 22, 1950.

'}
Hardenbergh/Rhinelander Historic District (Q5655873)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hardenberg/Rhinelander Historic District is a small historic district in the Carnegie Hill neighborhood of the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was created by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 5, 1998, and consists of six brick, brownstone and terra cotta Northern Renaissance Revival rowhouses along Lexington Avenue between East 89th and 90th Streets, and one apartment building, referred to as "French Flats" at the time, on East 89th Street. All the buildings were constructed in 1888–1889. \n

'}
Hal Robertson Field at Phillip Satow Stadium (Q5640913)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hal Robertson Field at Phillip Satow Stadium is a baseball venue in New York, New York, United States. It is home to the Columbia Lions baseball team of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. The facility is named for two Columbia baseball alumni– Hal Robertson (class of 1981) and Phillip Satow (class of 1963). In 2007, a FieldTurf surface was installed, allowing for more use of the field during the offseason. In 2010, chairback seats were added, and the dugouts, press box, and scoreboard were renovated.

'}
William K. Vanderbilt House (Q5652831)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William K. Vanderbilt House, also known as the Petit Chateau, was a Châteauesque mansion at 660 Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. It was next door to the Triple Palace of William Henry Vanderbilt, which occupied the entire block between 51st and 52nd streets on the west side of Fifth Avenue.

'}
Grand Central Academy of Art (Q5594401)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grand Central Atelier is an art school in the Long Island City neighborhood of the borough of Queens in New York City.\n

'}
Grove Atlantic (Q5611369)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Grove Atlantic, Inc. is an American independent publisher, based in New York City. Formerly styled "Grove/Atlantic, Inc.", it was created in 1993 by the merger of Grove Press and Atlantic Monthly Press. As of 2018 Grove Atlantic calls itself "An Independent Literary Publisher Since 1917".. That refers to the official date Atlantic Monthly Press was established by the Boston magazine The Atlantic Monthly.\n

'}
Hamilton-Madison House (Q5644806)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hamilton-Madison House is a voluntary, non-profit settlement house dedicated to improving the quality of life of its community, primarily that of the Two Bridges/Chinatown area of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, United States. The neighborhood is a federally designated poverty area, with a constantly changing mixture of ethnic groups, and lack of adequate services and resources. An average income of a family living in the area is $17,000. Further, more than 25% of the seniors live on less than $15,000 a year, of which 40% goes toward housing. In the past 108 years, Hamilton-Madison House has developed programs that meet the changing needs of its community. In 1965, with a change in federal immigration policies, the community's predominant immigrant became Chinese New Yorkers. Since that time, the organization's staff has grown to include a staff of 300 who collectively speak 15 languages, including 6 Chinese dialects. Further, the House's long-standing programs have been adapted to meet the cultural norms of this expanding population.\n

"}
Harperly Hall (Q5663468)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harperly Hall (also known as 41 Central Park West) is an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. The building is located along prestigious Central Park West and was built in 1910, it opened in 1911. Cast in the Arts and Crafts style, a rarity for New York City, Harperly Hall was designed by Henry W. Wilkinson. The structure was listed as a contributing property to the U.S. federal government designated Central Park West Historic District in 1982 when the district joined the National Register of Historic Places. At one time it was known as the Madonna building as Sean Penn and singer Madonna lived there together , then she sans Penn, then owned in absentia by the entertainer, and finally the material girl selling the spread in 2013 for $16 million US.

'}
Mineshaft (Q18211158)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Mineshaft was a members-only BDSM gay leather bar and sex club located at 835 Washington Street, at Little West 12th Street, in Manhattan, New York City, in the Meatpacking District, West Village, and Greenwich Village sections.

'}
Pabst Hotel (Q18151982)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Pabst Hotel occupied the north side of 42nd Street in Manhattan, New York City, between 7th Avenue and Broadway, in Longacre Square, from 1899 to 1902. It was demolished to make room for the new headquarters of The New York Times, for which Longacre Square was renamed Times Square.\n

'}
The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (Q18151598)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert is an American late-night talk show hosted by Stephen Colbert, which premiered on September 8, 2015. Produced by Spartina Productions and CBS Television Studios, it is the second iteration of CBS's Late Show franchise. The program is taped at the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York City and airs live to tape in most U.S. markets weeknights at 11:35\xa0p.m. ET/PT, as with its competitors Jimmy Kimmel Live! and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.\n

"}
Kent Fine Art (Q18636206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nKent Fine Art is an art gallery in New York City founded in 1985 by Douglas Walla.\n

'}
Grand Central Hotel (Q5594404)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Grand Central Hotel, later renamed the Broadway Central Hotel, was a hotel at 673 Broadway, New York City, that was famous as the site of the murder of financier James Fisk in 1872 by Edward S. Stokes.

'}
Gray's Papaya (Q5598121)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Gray's Papaya is a hot dog restaurant chain, open 24 hours a day year-round with its flagship restaurant located at 2090 Broadway at 72nd Street. The 402 Sixth Avenue at 8th Street and the 539 Eighth Avenue at 37th Street locations are no longer in operation. For several years, the flagship location was the only location left. In 2016, Gray's Papaya signed a 20-year lease for a new location at 612 Eighth Avenue, between West 39th and West 40th streets. The location opened in spring 2017.\n

"}
Greenmal Holding Corporation (Q5604313)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Greenmal Holding Corporation was a financial and real estate business started by Henry Greenberg and David Malzman in New York City, in the 1920s. The firm is significant because it was a company which dealt in large amounts of capital, and was based in the financial hub of the United States.\n

'}
Greenwich Avenue (Q5604832)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Greenwich Avenue, formerly Greenwich Lane, is a southeast-northwest avenue located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It extends from the intersection of 6th Avenue and 8th Street at its southeast end to its northwestern end at 8th Avenue between 14th Street and 13th Street. It is sometimes confused with Greenwich Street. Construction of West Village Park, bounded by Greenwich Avenue, 7th Avenue, and 12th Street, began in 2016.\n

'}
Ground Zero Gallery (Q5610907)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ground Zero Gallery was an art gallery formed in the East Village / Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York in the summer of 1983 as a vehicle for the partnership of artist James Romberger and his co-founder Marguerite Van Cook. In 1984 the gallery found its first physical home on East Eleventh Street and showed the work of many East Village artists who went on to gain national recognition. It was an early proponent of installation art. Ground Zero served as the production name for many projects in various media undertaken by the team of Van Cook and Romberger, until the September 11 attacks gave a new meaning to the term "ground zero" in New York City.\n

'}
Guss' Pickles (Q5620925)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Guss\' Pickles was founded by a Polish immigrant, Isidor Guss. Guss arrived in New York in 1910, and like hundreds of thousands of other Jewish immigrants, settled in the Lower East Side. Clustered in the "pickle district" of Essex and Ludlow streets, early 20th century pickle vendors gave birth to what would be known as "New York style" pickles.\n

'}
Haaren High School (Q5636542)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Haaren High School was an American high school located in Midtown Manhattan, New York. The school was noted for its vocational program including classes focusing on internal combustion engines. The facility was constructed in 1903 to house DeWitt Clinton High School. When that school relocated in 1927, it became home to Haaren High School until that school closed in the late 1970s. After developers announced plans to renovate the building to house offices, production studios and retail, John Jay College purchased the structure in 1988 and remodeled it to house offices, a library, classrooms and other facilities.

'}
Half Note Club (Q5641732)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Half Note was a jazz club in New York City, New York that flourished in two Manhattan locations – from 1957 to 1972 in SoHo (then known as the Village) at 289 Hudson Street at Spring Street and from 1972 to 1974 in Midtown at 149 West 54th Street, one block west of the Museum of Modern Art.\n

'}
Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden (Q5651015)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden Pocket Utopia was a contemporary art enterprise in New York City. The Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden merged with Pocket Utopia to become one gallery, Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden Pocket Utopia.

'}
HERE Arts Center (Q5629462)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

HERE Arts Center is a New York City-based off-off-Broadway presenting house, founded in 1993. Their location includes two stages specializing in hybrid performance, dance, theater, multi-media and puppetry in addition to art exhibition space and a cafe. Since 1993, HERE reports having supported over 14,000 artists and hosting approximately 1,000,000 audience members. HERE supports the work of artists at all stages in their careers through fully produced works, commissions and subsidized performance and rehearsal space.\n

'}
The Florent (Q18150155)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nFlorent was an all-night diner in the Meatpacking District of Manhattan that opened in 1985 and closed in 2008.\n

'}
Horace Greeley (Q18148837)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Horace Greeley, also known as the Greeley Memorial, is an outdoor bronze sculpture of Horace Greeley by Alexander Doyle, located in Greeley Square Park in Manhattan, New York. The statue, cast in 1892 and dedicated on May 30, 1894, sits atop a Quincy granite pedestal. It contains the following inscription:\n

'}
Horace Greeley (Q18152491)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

An outdoor bronze sculpture of Horace Greeley by artist John Quincy Adams Ward and architect Richard Morris Hunt is located in City Hall Park in Manhattan, New York. Cast in 1890 and dedicated in 1916, the seated statue is set on a Quincy granite pedestal.

'}
Chelsea Modern (Q18589098)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Chelsea Modern is a 12-story residential condominium building at 447 West 18th Street in Chelsea, Manhattan, United States, next to 459 West 18th Street. It was built by Madison Equities in 2009 and designed by Audrey Matlock. It has 47 apartments.\n

'}
The Charles (Q18619524)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Charles is a building on the Upper East Side in New York City.\n

'}
Hale Building (Q5641376)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hale Building was an office structure which opened in 1927 at 7 - 9 - 11 East44th Street (Manhattan). Fred T. Ley & Company built the edifice and Shreve & Lamb were its architects. It was owned by the Eleven East 44th Street Corporation. Hale Building is significant as an important residence for offices on the Lower East Side during the late 1920s and the Great Depression era.\n

'}
Samuel J. Tilden House (Q5680258)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Samuel J. Tilden House is a historic townhouse pair at 14-15 Gramercy Park South in Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1845, it was the home of Samuel J. Tilden (1814–1886), former governor of New York, a fierce opponent of the Tweed Ring and Tammany Hall, and the losing presidential candidate in the disputed 1876 election. Tilden lived in the brownstone from 1860 until his death in 1886. From 1881 to 1884, Calvert Vaux combined it with the row house next door, also built in 1845, to make the building that now stands, which has been described as "the height of Victorian Gothic in residential architecture" with Italian Renaissance style elements. Since 1906 it has been the headquarters of the National Arts Club, a private arts club.\n

'}
Knickerbocker Hospital (Q18153206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Knickerbocker Hospital was a hospital in New York City located at 70 Convent Avenue (prev. Amsterdam Ave.) corner of West 131st Street in Harlem, serving primarily poor and immigrant patients.

'}
World Class Learning Academy (Q18705807)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Nord Anglia International School, New York, formerly World Class Learning Academy, New York (also known as WCLA, WCLANY or WCLA, NY), is a for-profit international school in New York. The school was established in 2011 and currently educates students who represent over 35 nations. It is a member of the Nord Anglia Education family of schools.\n

'}
Grand Central Art Galleries (Q5594399)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Grand Central Art Galleries were the exhibition and administrative space of the nonprofit Painters and Sculptors Gallery Association, an artists' cooperative established in 1922 by Walter Leighton Clark together with John Singer Sargent, Edmund Greacen, and others. Artists closely associated with the Grand Central Art Galleries included Hovsep Pushman, George de Forest Brush, and especially Sargent, whose posthumous show took place there in 1928.

"}
Gregorio Luperón High School for Math & Science (Q5606726)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gregorio Luperón High School for Math & Science (in Spanish: Secundaria Gregorio Luperón) is located in District 6 of the borough of Manhattan, New York, United States\nThe school is named after General Gregorio Luperón, a Dominican military and state leader.\n

'}
Independence Flagstaff (Q18148953)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Independence Flagstaff, also known as the Charles F. Murphy Memorial Flagpole, is an outdoor memorial by sculptor Anthony de Francisci, located in Union Square Park in Manhattan, New York, which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence. The memorial was cast in 1926 and dedicated on July 4, 1930. It was made of steel, with copper sheathing, and is set on a granite pedestal which includes bronze bas-reliefs and plaques. The monument is in axial alignment with Henry Kirke Brown's statues of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

"}
Klughaus Gallery (Q18153201)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nKlughaus Gallery is an art gallery and agency based in New York City that exhibits and represents artists with roots in graffiti and street culture. \n

'}
Richard Morris Hunt Memorial (Q18156903)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Richard Morris Hunt Memorial is a memorial to the architect Richard Morris Hunt, designed by Bruce Price with sculptures by Daniel Chester French, located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York. It was erected in 1898 by the Art Societies of New York.

'}
Harkness Theatre (Q18348374)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Colonial Theatre in New York City was at Broadway and 62nd Street in what was then the San Juan Hill neighborhood on the Upper West Side, Manhattan. Originally named the Colonial Music Hall, it was opened in 1905 by Frederic Thompson and Elmer "Skip" Dundy. Designed by George Keister, the theater had a seating capacity of 1,293.

'}
Barbizon Hotel (Q20708682)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
  • From an alternative name: This is a redirect from a title that is another name such as a pseudonym, a nickname, or a synonym of the target, or of a name associated with the target.\n
    • This redirect leads to the title in accordance with the naming conventions for common names to aid searches and writing. It is not necessary to replace these redirected links with a piped link.
    • \n
    • If this redirect is an incorrect name for the target, then {{R from incorrect name}} should have been used instead.
    • \n
  • \n
'}
WOW Cafe (Q20715146)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WOW Cafe (Women's One World) is a feminist theater space in New York City. In the mid-1980s, WOW Cafe was central to the avant garde theatre and performance art scene in the East Village, New York City. Among the artists who have presented at the space are Lisa Kron, Holly Hughes, Deb Margolin, Dancenoise, Carmelita Tropicana, Eileen Myles, Split Britches, and The Five Lesbian Brothers.

"}
Center for the History of Collecting (Q20745457)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Center for the History of Collecting is a research institute of the Frick Art Reference Library, which is attached to The Frick Collection. It promotes and sponsors the study of the history of collecting.\n

'}
Stop Iran Rally (Q20858388)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stop Iran Rally took place in Times Square, New York City, on July 22, 2015. The rally was against the just-signed Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, which was perceived to give Iran the ability to gain a nuclear weapon. Protestors and speakers encouraged the United States Congress to vote against the deal. Since most Republicans in Congress were already against it, the rally focused on persuading Democratic members of Congress, especially Chuck Schumer. Members of both parties, including former New York governor George Pataki and Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz spoke against the deal.

'}
First Avenue station (BMT Canarsie Line) (Q2590604)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

First Avenue is a station on the BMT Canarsie Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of First Avenue and East 14th Street at the border of Stuyvesant Park, Stuyvesant Town, and the East Village in Manhattan, it is served by the L train at all times.\n

'}
Riverside Drive (Q2589766)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Riverside Drive is a scenic north-south thoroughfare in the Manhattan borough of New York City. The boulevard runs on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, generally parallel to the Hudson River from 72nd Street to near the George Washington Bridge at 181st Street. North of 96th Street, Riverside Drive is a wide divided boulevard. At several locations, a serpentine local street diverges from the main road, providing access to the residential buildings. Some of the city's most coveted addresses are located along its route.\n

"}
287 Broadway (Q18748914)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

287 Broadway is a historical building on the corner of Broadway at Reade Street in the Tribeca neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City. Designed by John B. Snook in 1871 using cast-iron in mixed Italianate and French Second Empire style, it was completed in 1872 for the Stephen Storm estate. The landmark, which “graphically illustrates the transformation of lower Broadway in the 19th century from a residential boulevard into the city’s commercial center”, was leaning approximately 0.66 feet (0.20\xa0m) by 2008.

'}
Seaman-Drake Arch (Q19735231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Seaman-Drake Arch, also known as the Inwood Arch, located at 5065 Broadway at West 216th Street in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is a remnant of a hilltop estate built in 1855 by the Seaman family. The arch, which was built from Inwood marble quarried nearby, is 35 feet (10.67\xa0m) tall, 20 feet (6.10\xa0m) deep, and 40 feet (12.19\xa0m) wide, and was once the gateway to the estate.

'}
2015 East Village gas explosion (Q19856973)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

A gas explosion occurred in the afternoon of March 26, 2015, in a building located at 121 Second Avenue, in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The explosion was caused by an illegal tap into a gas main. The explosion caused two deaths, injured at least nineteen people, four critically, and the resulting fire completely destroyed three adjacent buildings at 119, 121, and 123 Second Avenue between East 7th Street and St. Marks Place.\n

'}
El Avram (Q20656892)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

El Avram, located at 80 Grove street, was an Israel and Mediterranean themed nightclub in New York City, United States.

'}
New York Dream Center (Q20657426)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The LA Dream Center, under the leadership of Pastor Matthew Barnett, planted the New York Dream Center in the summer of 2008. Pastor Brad Reed and his wife, Stella, were both part of the LA Dream Center's leadership for over ten years before they moved their family to New York City to become the lead pastors of the New York Dream Center. \nThe Dream Center provides hope by meeting both the tangible and spiritual needs of those in New York City communities. \nThey are a church in New York City. They meet Sunday mornings in Chelsea, Manhattan at the New York City Lab School for Collaborative Studies, and throughout the week all over the city serving communities and meeting the needs of the people around them. The mission of the New York Dream Center is to walk alongside people right where they are, to where God dreams for them to be.\n

"}
Nassau Street (Q2597808)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Nassau Street is a street in the Financial District, within the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Nassau Street's southern end is at the intersection with Broad Street and Wall Street, and its northern end is at Spruce Street, at Pace University near the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Nassau Street runs one block east of Broadway and east of Park Row. \n

"}
Hotel Manhattan (Q19361343)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hotel Manhattan (also known as Manhattan Hotel) was a US "railroad hotel" located on the northwest corner of Madison Avenue and 42nd Street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. Built in 1895-96, it was to an 1893 design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh. Standing at 250 feet (76\xa0m), it at one time held the record as "tallest hotel structure in the world". Architectural features included three levels of dormers and a chateuesque roof. It was razed in 1961 to make way for an office tower. Built by Marc Eidlitz & Son, there were 16.5 stories, with 14 stories above the street level. The electrical contractor was C. L. Eidlitz. The fixtures, to a design by Hardenbergh, were manufactured by the Archer Pancoast Company. The hotel was opened under the proprietorship of Hawk & Wetherbee.

'}
BookCon (Q19865528)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

BookCon is an annual fan convention established in 2014 in New York City. Taking the name format from other fan conventions such as Comic-Con, BookCon was established to combine pop culture and the book industry. Many authors, celebrities and publishing professionals attend BookCon.

'}
Ichimura at Brushstroke (Q19876430)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brushstroke was a Japanese kaiseki restaurant located on Hudson Street in Manhattan, New York City. The owners of the restaurant are French chef David Bouley and Yoshiki Tsuji, who is president of Tsuji culinary school in Osaka Japan. Sushi Ichimura at brushstroke was opened inside of the restaurant, brushstoke in 2012. They had the head chef Toyko trained Eiji Ichimura, who has been cooking sushi for over 40 years.

'}
111 Murray Street (Q20715277)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

111 Murray Street (formerly known as 101 Murray Street or 101 Tribeca) is a residential skyscraper completed in 2018 in Manhattan, New York City. Developed by Witkoff Group and Fisher Brothers, the building is located at the intersection of Murray and West Streets, in the Financial District and Tribeca neighborhoods and close to Battery Park City.\n

'}
221st Street (Q20857783)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

221st Street was a local station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Broadway and 221st Street in Inwood, Manhattan. It operated for less than a year.\n

'}
Duke Ellington House (Q2610027)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Duke Ellington House is a historic residence at 935 St. Nicholas Avenue, in Manhattan, New York City. Apartment 4A in this apartment house was the home of Duke Ellington (1899-1974), the noted African American composer and jazz pianist, from 1939 through 1961. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

'}
Hester Street (Q5746336)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hester Street is a street in the Lower East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. \n

'}
Morgan Lehman Gallery (Q18749104)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nMorgan Lehman is a contemporary art gallery specializing in promoting the work of emerging and mid-career American artists working in a wide spectrum of creative media. Morgan Lehman promotes its own roster of artists as well as collaborating on exhibitions and projects with various creative practitioners across the globe.a. Founded by Sally Morgan (née Oberbeck) and Jay Lehman, the gallery opened in New York City in 2005. Morgan Lehman has mounted the first New York exhibition for a number of artists including Frohawk Two Feathers, Bret Slater, John Salvest, Paul Wackers, and Andrew Schoultz.\n

'}
Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden (Q19863972)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden is an outdoor courtyard at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan, New York City. Designed by notable architect Philip Johnson, the courtyard was conceived at the same time as Johnson's West Wing annex for the museum. Construction began in the spring on 1952 and was completed in April 1953.

"}
Basin Street East (Q19865233)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Basin Street East was a notable nightclub of the 1960s in New York City. Several live albums were recorded there, including Peggy Lee's Basin Street East Proudly Presents Miss Peggy Lee (1961), and Billy Eckstine's At Basin St. East (1961).

"}
Caspar Samler farm (Q19866217)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Caspar Samler farm was a tract of land comprising the greater part of Fifth Avenue from Madison Square to 31st Street in what is now the Koreatown section of Manhattan, New York City, New York.\n

'}
Paterno Castle (Q19867485)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Paterno Castle was an estate in the Hudson Heights section of the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City which featured a Neo-Gothic mansion built in 1905 and based on a European castle. It was owned by its namesake, the real estate developer and philanthropist, Dr. Charles V. Paterno. The castle cost more than half a million dollars to build. The interior featured a cellar dedicated to raising mushrooms and a swimming pool which employed filtered water from the nearby Hudson River, while, the grounds featured Italian gardens and pergolas.

'}
Comedy Theatre (Q20858210)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Comedy Theatre was a Broadway theatre located at 110 West 41st Street in Manhattan that opened in 1909. It presented the first Broadway appearances of Katharine Cornell and Ruth Draper, as well as Eugene O'Neill's first Broadway play. Shuttered in the wake of the Depression, it reopened in 1937 as the Mercury Theatre — the venue for Orson Welles's groundbreaking adaptation of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and other productions for the Mercury Theatre repertory company. In 1939 it began presenting classic Yiddish theatre. The building was demolished in 1942.\n

"}
Hetrick-Martin Institute (Q5748013)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hetrick-Martin Institute (HMI) is a New York City-based non-profit organization devoted to serving the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth between the ages of 13 and 24, and their families.\n

'}
Hilltop Park (Q5764114)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hilltop Park was the nickname of a baseball park that stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. It was the home of the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball from 1903 to 1912, when they were known as the "Highlanders". It was also the temporary home of the New York Giants during a two-month period in 1911 while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt after a fire.\n

'}
Hotel New Netherland (Q19361341)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hotel New Netherland (later Hotel Netherland) was located at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and 59th Street, in Manhattan, New York City, New York, in what is now the Upper East Side Historic District. It contained the Sherry's restaurant from 1919 until its demolition in 1927.\n

"}
Greater Hood Memorial AME Zion Church (Q19876268)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Greater Hood Memorial AME Zion Church was the first black church in Harlem, New York. It now receives notoriety as the "Oldest Continuing" church in Harlem. The church’s first house of worship was erected on East 117th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues in 1843.\n

'}
CUNY School of Public Health (Q20011419)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (commonly known as the CUNY School of Public Health, or CUNY SPH) is a public American research and professional college within the City University of New York (CUNY) system of colleges. The school is situated at 55 West 125th Street in Manhattan. CUNY SPH offers doctoral programs, master's programs, several certificates, and faculty memberships in many of CUNY's research centers and institutes. A core roster of over 50 full-time faculty is supplemented by additional faculty members drawn from throughout CUNY.\n

"}
Jacob Ruppert, Sr. House (Q20486921)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jacob Ruppert Sr. House was a large mansion located on 1115 Fifth Avenue (now 1119 Fifth Avenue) on the southeast corner of East 93rd Street and Fifth Avenue, in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.

'}
King Tut's Wah Wah Hut (Q20657120)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

King Tut's Wah Wah Hut was a club and experimental theater space in the Lower East Side of New York City, operating in the mid-1980s and 1990s at 112 Avenue A at 7th Street.

"}
Swiss Institute (Q20715090)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Swiss Institute / Contemporary Art New York (SI) is an independent non-profit contemporary art organization founded in 1986. SI is located 38 St Marks Pl, the corner of Second Avenue and St Marks Place in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan. Exhibitions include visual and performing arts, design, and architecture, with public programs spanning a wide range of topics. SI also has weekly public programming and education classes. Admission is free.\n

'}
Waldorf–Astoria (Q18749268)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Built in 1893 and expanded in 1897, the Waldorf–Astoria was razed in 1929 to make way for construction of the Empire State Building. Its successor, the current Waldorf Astoria New York, was built on Park Avenue in 1931.\n

'}
WNBC (Q2731065)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNBC, virtual channel 4 (UHF digital channel 35), is the flagship station of the NBC television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by the NBC Owned Television Stations subsidiary of NBCUniversal (itself a subsidiary of Comcast), as part of a duopoly with Linden, New Jersey-licensed Telemundo co-flagship WNJU (channel 47). WNBC's studios and offices are co-located with NBC's corporate headquarters at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in Midtown Manhattan; it shares transmitter facilities with WNJU at One World Trade Center.\n

"}
William C. Whitney House (Q8006422)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William C. Whitney House was a mansion located on 871 Fifth Avenue and 68th Street in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Wintuk (Q8026638)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Wintuk (pronounced win-took; amalgamating the English word "winter" with Inupiaq phonetics) was a semi-permanent and seasonal residency show created by Cirque du Soleil. Wintuk played seasonally from 2007 to 2011 at the former WaMu Theater at Madison Square Garden (now the Hulu Theater) entertainment complex in New York.

'}
Wood Tobé-Coburn School (Q8032283)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Wood Tobé–Coburn School was a private for-profit career collegein New York City. It closed in 2017.\n

'}
Yeshiva College (Q8052821)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Yeshiva College is located in New York City’s Washington Heights neighborhood in Upper Manhattan. It is Yeshiva University’s undergraduate college of liberal arts and sciences for men. (Stern College for Women is Yeshiva College’s counterpart for women.) The architecture reflects a search for a distinctly Jewish style appropriate to American academia.

'}
Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School (Q28131857)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School (WHEELS) is a PreK - 12 public school in Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City, serving grades PreK - 3 and 6 - 12. It is a part of the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE).

'}
Lenox Library (Q28206312)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Lenox Library was a library incorporated and endowed in 1870. It was both an architectural and intellectual landmark in Gilded Age-era New York City. It was founded by bibliophile and philanthropist James Lenox, and located on Fifth Avenue between 70th and 71st Streets on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt designed the building, which was considered one of the city's most notable buildings, until its destruction in 1912.\n

"}
Trump Parc (Q28186627)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Trump Parc and Trump Parc East are two adjoining buildings in Manhattan owned by The Trump Organization. They are located at the southwest corner of Central Park South and Sixth Avenue. Trump Parc (the former Barbizon-Plaza Hotel) is a 38-story condominium building, and Trump Parc East is a 14-story apartment and condominium building.\n

'}
The Gateway School (Q28451528)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gateway School is an independent school on the Upper West Side of Manhattan serving children ages 5–14 with learning disabilities. It currently enrolls approximately 180 students.

'}
57th Street (Q2711129)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\n

'}
New York Chinese School (Q2678165)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Chinese Community Center at 60-64 Mott Street is home to both the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA), the oldest Chinese community service organization of Chinatown established in 1883, and New York Chinese School, established in 1909 for children who came from overseas; both are located in the same Manhattan Chinatown building in New York City. The building itself is considered a Chinatown "town hall". Both the New York Chinese School and the CCBA are affiliated.

'}
Grand Street (Q5595116)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Grand Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and the upper level had one track that served the express trains. The next stop to the north was Rivington Street. The next stop to the south was Canal Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
William A. Clark House (Q8003926)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William A. Clark House, nicknamed "Clark\'s Folly", was a mansion located at 962 Fifth Avenue on the northeast corner of its intersection with East 77th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was demolished in 1927 and replaced with a luxury apartment building (960 Fifth Avenue).\n

'}
William Esper Studio (Q8008661)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William Esper Studio was founded in 1965 as a school for the performing arts in Manhattan, New York. The school is dedicated to the acting technique of Sanford Meisner. Its founder, William "Bill" Esper, is often referred to as the best-known of Meisner\'s first generation teachers, and his most "authentic protege".

'}
Windsor Hotel (Q8024638)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Windsor Hotel was located at 575 Fifth Avenue (at the corner of East 47th Street) in Manhattan, New York. The seven-story hotel opened in 1873, at a time when hotel residency was becoming popular with the wealthy, and was advertised as "the most comfortable and homelike hotel in New York." It burned down in 1899 with great loss of life.\n

'}
Winter Garden Theatre (Q8026228)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The first theatre in New York City to bear the name The Winter Garden Theatre had a brief but important seventeen-year history (beginning in 1850) as one of New York's premier showcases for a wide range of theatrical fare, from Variety shows to extravagant productions of the works of Shakespeare. Initially known as Tripler's Hall or Metropolitan Hall, it burned down in 1854 and was rebuilt as The New York Theatre. Although it burned to the ground several times, it rose from the ashes under different managers, bearing various names, to become known as one of the most important theatres in New York history.

"}
World Trade Center cross (Q8036345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The World Trade Center cross, also known as the Ground Zero cross, is a formation of steel beams found among the debris of the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan, New York City, following the September 11 attacks in 2001. This set of beams is so named because it resembles the proportions of a Christian cross. The beams have been part of an exhibit at the National September 11 Museum since 2014.\n

'}
Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (Q11265)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal is a New York City Subway station complex located under Times Square and the Port Authority Bus Terminal, at the intersection of 42nd Street, Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan. It is the busiest station complex in the system, serving 64,531,511 passengers in 2016.

'}
Zabriskie Gallery (Q8063605)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Zabriskie Gallery was founded in New York City by Virginia Zabriskie in 1954.\n

'}
Zicklin School of Business (Q8071469)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Zicklin School of Business (commonly known as Zicklin) is Baruch College's business school. It was established in 1919 and is named after financier and alumnus Lawrence Zicklin. The current dean is H. Fenwick Huss, formerly dean of the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. Zicklin is the only unit of the City University of New York that is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).\n

"}
247 Cherry (Q25197556)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

247 Cherry is a 79-story residential building under development in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The building was designed by SHoP Architects, and is being developed by JDS Development Group. Renderings for the building were first released in April 2016. The building will be adjacent to One Manhattan Square. 247 Cherry will be developed in conjunction with two other nearby skyscrapers: 269 South Street and 259 Clinton Street.

'}
Clocktower Productions (Q25230346)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Clocktower Productions is a non-profit art institution working in the visual arts, performance, music, and radio. It was founded in 1972 as The Clocktower Gallery by Alanna Heiss, the Founder and former Director of MoMA PS1 (formerly P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center) under the aegis of the Institute for Art and Urban Resources. From 1972 until 2013, the institution operated out of a City-owned McKim, Mead & White building in Lower Manhattan, the former New York Life Insurance Company Building.\n

'}
5 in 1 (Q26299940)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

5 in 1 is an outdoor 1973–1974 painted CorTen steel sculpture by Tony Rosenthal (1914–2009), installed at 1 Police Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York.

'}
Fort Gansevoort (Q28207046)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Fort Gansevoort was a former United States Army fort in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It was also called the White Fort due to its whitewashed exterior. The fort was named for Peter Gansevoort, a Revolutionary War officer. It was located between Gansevoort Street and West 12th Street, near the west end of Gansevoort Street, strategically positioned to defend the Hudson River. The fort was completed in 1812, shortly after the outbreak of the War of 1812, and mounted 22 guns, along with a shot furnace, magazine, arsenal, and barracks. Some sources state that construction began in 1808; however, the fort does not appear in the Secretary of War's report on fortifications for December 1811. Forts built with state or local resources did not appear in these reports. The fort was part of what was later called the second system of US fortifications. It did not see action, as New York City was not attacked in that war. It was demolished in either 1849 or 1854 (references vary). It was on the site of a previous weapons development center, where George Bomford developed the first columbiad cannon.

"}
Globe Institute of Technology (Q28206778)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Globe Institute of Technology was a private for-profit college located in Manhattan, New York. It offered baccalaureate, associate, and certificate programs in business and information technology as well as a sports program. Globe Institute of Technology was accredited by the New York State Board of Regents prior to the school ceasing operations in 2016.

'}
Manhattan Vocational and Technical High School (Q28206813)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Manhattan Vocational and Technical High School is a former high school located in New York City. It closed in the year 1984. It was located on east 96th street. In 1968 it was pad locked as a result of a teachers strike. Famous alumni included Rick Rasmussen.

'}
Children's Cancer and Blood Foundation (Q28402471)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Children's Cancer and Blood Foundation (CCBF) is a registered charity in the United States. Founded in 1952, CCBF is the first and largest charitable organization dedicated to supporting the care of children with cancer and blood diseases.

"}
Bar Next Door at La Lanterna di Vittorio (Q28873489)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

La Lanterna di Vittorio is a cafe and pizzeria at 129 MacDougal Street, Greenwich Village, New York City. The restaurant is situated in a restored townhouse and serves Italian cuisine. It is noted for its Bar Next Door room in the basement which hosts regular live jazz and rock performances. The basement is characterized by "low ceilings, and exposed brick and romantic lighting". In 2007, Jazz Education Journal referred to it as "One of NYC\'s great secrets for a first-class jazz experience." The Jonathan Kreisberg Trio are regular performers at the clubs on Wednesdays.

'}
Great Fire of New York (Q2740393)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Great Fire of New York was a devastating fire that burned through the night of September 20, 1776, and into the morning of September 21, on the West Side of what then constituted New York City at the southern end of the island of Manhattan. It broke out in the early days of the military occupation of the city by British forces during the American Revolutionary War.\n

'}
Whitehall Street (Q7995998)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Whitehall Street is a four-block-long street in the South Ferry/Financial District neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, near the southern tip of Manhattan Island. The street begins at the southern end of Broadway, at the intersection with Stone Street. Whitehall Street stretches south to the southern end of FDR Drive, adjacent to the Staten Island Ferry's Whitehall Terminal, on landfill beyond the site of Peter Stuyvesant's 17th-century house. \n

"}
William Salomon House (Q8018055)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William Salomon House was a mansion located on 1020 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
William Street (Q8018910)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

William Street is a street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It runs generally southwest to northeast, crossing Wall Street and terminating at Broad Street and Spruce Street, respectively. Between Beaver Street and Broad Street, the street is known as South William Street. Between Beekman Street and Spruce Street, in front of New York Downtown Hospital, William Street is a pedestrian-only street.\n

'}
Clarence Whitman Mansion (Q24060960)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Clarence Whitman Mansion is a historic townhouse on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, U.S. It was designed in the Renaissance Revival architectural style by Parish & Schroeder, and its construction was completed in 1898. It belonged to Sam Salz, an art dealer, from the 1940s to the 1970s. It was purchased by Bungo Shimada, a Japanese philanthropist, in 1990.

'}
James Watson House (Q2687425)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The James Watson House, at 7 State Street between Pearl and Water Streets in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1793 and extended in 1806, and is now the rectory of the Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton. It is located near the southern tip of Manhattan Island, across from Battery Park.\n

'}
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (Q2671637)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) is part of the United Nations Secretariat and is responsible for the follow-up to major United Nations Summits and Conferences, as well as services to the United Nations Economic and Social Council and the Second and Third Committees of the United Nations General Assembly. UN DESA assists countries around the world in agenda-setting and decision-making with the goal of meeting their economic, social and environmental challenges. It supports international cooperation to promote sustainable development for all, having as a foundation the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as adopted by the UN General Assembly on 25 September 2015. In providing a broad range of analytical products, policy advice, and technical assistance, UN DESA effectively translates global commitments in the economic, social and environmental spheres into national policies and actions and continues to play a key role in monitoring progress towards internationally agreed-upon development goals. It is also a member of the United Nations Development Group.

'}
Bleecker Street (Q2724557)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bleecker Street is an east–west street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is most famous today as a Greenwich Village nightclub district. The street connects a neighborhood today popular for music venues and comedy, but which was once a major center for American bohemia. The street is named after the family name of Anthony Lispenard Bleecker, a banker, the father of Anthony Bleecker, a 19th-century writer, through whose family farm the street ran.

'}
WABC-TV (Q2699014)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WABC-TV, virtual and VHF digital channel 7, is the flagship station of the ABC television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by the ABC Owned Television Stations subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company. WABC-TV's studios are located on Lincoln Square on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, adjacent to ABC's corporate headquarters; its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

"}
Winter Garden Atrium (Q8026225)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Winter Garden Atrium is a 10-story glass-vaulted pavilion on Vesey Street in New York City's Brookfield Place (formerly World Financial Center) office complex. Designed by Diana Balmori, the Atrium was originally constructed in 1988, and substantially rebuilt in 2002, after it was damaged by the collapse of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks. The Atrium houses various plants, trees and flowers, and shops. The rear of the building opens onto the World Financial Center Plaza and the North Cove Yacht Harbor on the Hudson River.\n

"}
Yeshiva Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (Q8052840)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Yeshiva Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (YRSRH, also known as Breuer's, after its creator) was founded in New York City in 1944, as a means of reestablishing the Orthodox Jewish community of Frankfurt, Germany in the United States. The school, founded by Rabbi Joseph Breuer, is run according to the philosophy of Rabbi Breuer's grandfather, Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch. It is located in the Upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights.\n

"}
Zach Feuer Gallery (Q8063799)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Zach Feuer Gallery is a contemporary art gallery that operated from 2000 to 2016 in New York City, Hudson, NY, and Los Angeles.\n

'}
New York Public Library and Bryant Park (Q8247542)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New York Public Library and Bryant Park is a conjunction of the New York Public Library Main Branch and the adjacent Bryant Park.

'}
Broadway (Q11260)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broadway () is a road in the U.S. state of New York. Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13\xa0mi (21\xa0km) through the borough of Manhattan and 2\xa0mi (3.2\xa0km) through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18\xa0mi (29\xa0km) through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.

'}
Zen Studies Society (Q8068967)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Zen Studies Society was established in 1956 by Cornelius Crane to help assist the scholar Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki in his work and to help promulgate Zen Buddhism in Western countries.. It operates both New York Zendo Shobo-Ji in New York City and Dai Bosatsu Zendo Kongo-Ji in the Catskills area of New York State. Influenced by the teachings of Soen Nakagawa Roshi and Nyogen Senzaki, ZSS is one of the oldest organizations dedicated to the practice of Rinzai Zen in the United States. \n

'}
Brookfield Place (Q8006299)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Brookfield Place, built and still commonly referred to as the World Financial Center, is a shopping center and office-building complex located across West Street from the World Trade Center in the Battery Park City neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Overlooking the Hudson River, Brookfield Place has been home to offices of various companies including Merrill Lynch, RBC Capital Markets, Nomura Group, American Express, Bank of New York Mellon, Time Inc. 95.5 K-LOVE, 96.7 Air1, and Brookfield Asset Management. In 2014, the complex was given its current name following the completion of extensive renovations.\n

'}
Weylin Hotel (Q7990338)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Weylin Hotel was a hotel at 527\xa0-\xa0531 Madison Avenue and 40 - 54 East 54th Street in New York City. It was on the southeast corner of 54th Street. The structure was sixteen stories tall and opened in March 1921. The building fronted sixty-one feet on Madison Avenue and one hundred forty-eight feet on 54th Street. It contained 125,000 square feet (11,600\xa0m2) of space.

'}
William E. Macaulay Honors College (Q8008270)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

William E. Macaulay Honors College, commonly referred to as Macaulay Honors College or simply Macaulay, is a selective, co-degree-granting honors college for students at the City University of New York (CUNY) system in New York City. The college is known primarily for offering full-tuition scholarships to all of its undergraduates (or a substantial partial scholarship to out-of-state students). For the class of 2020, there were 6,272 applicants and the number of enrolled students was 537. The average high school GPA and SAT for the class of 2020 was 94.1 and 1414, respectively.\nSince 2016, the college has consistently received the highest rating for a public university honors college.

'}
William H. Moore House (Q8010519)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The William H. Moore House, also known as the Stokes-Moore Mansion and once home to the America-Israel Cultural Foundation, is a historic building located in New York, New York. The building was designed by the architecture firm McKim, Mead & White and built between 1898 and 1900. It is a five-story, rectangular stone building in the Renaissance Revival style. It has an English basement and flat roof with balustrade and overhanging cornice. It was commissioned by William Earle Dodge Stokes (1852–1926), and purchased by financier William Henry Moore (1848-1923) before its completion. His wife resided in the house until her death in 1955, after which it housed a succession of commercial and charitable organizations, including the Banco di Napoli.

'}
Wurzweiler School of Social Work (Q8039325)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wurzweiler School of Social Work at Yeshiva University was founded in 1957. It is a methods-based institution offering concentrations in clinical casework, social group work, and community social work. Fieldwork is an integral part of the curriculum. Classes are held at Yeshiva University’s Wilf campus, in New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood, and Beren campus, in New York’s Murray Hill neighborhood.\n

'}
York Theatre (Q8055572)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

York Theatre is an Off-Broadway theatre company based in East Midtown Manhattan, New York City. In its 50th year, York Theatre is dedicated to the production of new musicals and concert productions of forgotten musicals from the past. Each season consists of three or four mainstage productions, six or more concert presentations and dozens of developmental readings. It has had several transfers of its work to larger off-Broadway theatres and to Broadway. The company was awarded a special Drama Desk Award in 1996 to its artistic director Janet Hayes Walker and in 2006 for its "vital contributions to theater by developing and presenting new musicals".

'}
Young Judaea (Q8058203)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Young Judaea is a peer-led Zionist youth movement that runs programs throughout the United States for Jewish youth in grades 2–12. In Hebrew, Young Judaea is called Yehudah Hatzair or is sometimes referred to as Hashachar, which means "the dawn." Founded in 1909, it is the oldest Zionist youth movement in the United States.

'}
Wadleigh High School for Girls (Q7959300)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wadleigh High School for Girls, which was established by the NYC Board of Education in 1897, and which moved into its new building in September 1902, was the first public high school for girls in New York City.\nAt the time, public secondary education for girls was considered highly novel and perhaps a bit scandalous. Newspapers considered it newsworthy enough to devote many stories to describing classroom scenes of girls receiving “higher” education.

'}
WaHI (Q7958535)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WaHI stands for "Washington Heights and Inwood," two neighborhoods of Upper Manhattan in New York City. The term was coined by Eduardo Gómez, founder of the WaHI Online community web site, in 2002. The term is commonly used and understood within WaHI Online, but has not caught on widely elsewhere (as opposed to, for example, Hudson Heights, which was chosen by a group of neighborhood activistsand is widely cited). This may be because while Washington Heights and Inwood share the distinction of being the northernmost communities of Manhattan (with attendantly lower housing costs), they are very distinct neighborhoods demographically and geographically, and are represented by different district councils seats (District 10 for Washington Heights, 7 for Inwood).\n

'}
Washington Square Methodist Episcopal Church (Q7972213)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Washington Square Methodist Episcopal Church was a former Methodist church located at 135 West Fourth Street, Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York. It was built in 1860, became a United Methodist church and closed in 2004 when its diminished congregation rented space in Trinity Chapel, New York University (1964). The church was also known as "The Peace Church" resulting from the congregation\'s opposition to the Vietnam War. Paul Abels, New York City\'s first openly gay clergyman, served as the church\'s pastor from 1973 to 1984 and promoted acceptance of the gay and lesbian community. The church could not be demolished as it was located in the Greenwich Village Historic District and was instead converted into "Novare", a condominium apartment building.

'}
West Broadway (Q7984573)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

West Broadway is a north-south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, separated into two parts by Tribeca Park. The northern part begins at Tribeca Park, near the intersection of Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), Walker Street and Beach Street in Tribeca. It runs northbound as a one-way street past Canal Street and becomes two-way at the intersection with Grand Street one block farther north. West Broadway then operates as a main north-south thoroughfare through SoHo until its northern end at Houston Street, on the border between SoHo and Greenwich Village. North of Houston Street, it is designated as LaGuardia Place, which continues until Washington Square South.\n

'}
WPXO-LD (Q7954565)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WPXO-LD, virtual channel 34 (VHF digital channel 4), is a low-powered América Tevé-affiliated television station licensed to East Orange, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. The station is owned by Caribevision Holdings, Inc. WPXO-LD's transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.\n

"}
Demarest Building (Q22022327)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Demarest Building is a multi-purpose commercial building located at 339 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, United States. It was built by Aaron T. Demarest in 1890 in the downtown commerce district to showcase the high-end carriages that he manufactured. The building is notable for being the first with an electric elevator.\n

'}
World Trade Center bombing 1993 (Q11240)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1993 World Trade Center bombing was a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, carried out on February 26, 1993, when a truck bomb detonated below the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. The 1,336\xa0lb (606\xa0kg) urea nitrate–hydrogen gas enhanced device was intended to send the North Tower (Tower 1) crashing into the South Tower (Tower 2), bringing both towers down and killing thousands of people. It failed to do so, but killed six people and injured over one thousand.

'}
September 11 attacks (Q10806)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11) were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10\xa0billion in infrastructure and property damage.

'}
Broad Street (Q2613951)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Broad Street is a narrow street located in the Financial District in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It stretches from South Street to Wall Street.\n

'}
WNJU (Q7953460)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNJU, virtual channel 47 (UHF digital channel 35), is a Telemundo owned-and-operated television station licensed to Linden, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. It is one of two East Coast flagship stations of the Spanish-language network (alongside WSCV in Miami–Fort Lauderdale, Florida). WNJU is owned by the Telemundo Station Group subsidiary of NBCUniversal (itself a subsidiary of Comcast), as part of a duopoly with New York-licensed NBC flagship WNBC (channel 4). WNJU's studios are located in Fort Lee, New Jersey, and it shares transmitter facilities with WNBC at One World Trade Center.\n

"}
Ward-Nasse Gallery (Q7968924)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Ward-Nasse Gallery is a commercial, art gallery for visual, spoken and performing artists in New York City.

'}
Weissman School of Arts and Sciences (Q7980414)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Weissman School of Arts and Sciences is a school within Baruch College of the City University of New York, named after George Weissman, former president of Philip Morris, along with his wife Mildred; both were alumni of the school. The Weissman School is one of the three schools that comprise Baruch College and offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in various disciplines. While the Zicklin School of Business is Baruch's largest school, Weissman offers a majority of the courses in the required core curriculum for undergraduates.\n

"}
West 147th-149th Streets Historic District (Q7984212)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

West 147th–149th Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem, New York, New York. It consists of 60 contributing buildings; 58 tenements, one school, and one stable built between 1894 and 1905. With the exception of the stable, all of the buildings are five or six stories tall, all with brick facades. Most have some form of terra cotta ornament and all have pressed metal cornices. The earlier buildings reflect the Romanesque Revival style, with ornamental inspiration drawn from Renaissance and French Beaux-Arts styles.

'}
Westchester House (Q7987251)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Westchester House, currently the Sohotel, is a hotel on the Bowery at Broome Street in Manhattan, New York City. It was later renamed the Occidental, the Pioneer, and now the Sohotel New York. The building that housed the Sohotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 20, 1986. As of 2014, the Sohotel has been fully renovated.\n

'}
Lower Manhattan (Q11253)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in 1624, at a point which now constitutes the present-day Financial District. The population of the Financial District alone has grown to an estimated 61,000 residents as of 2018, up from 43,000 as of 2014, which in turn was nearly double the 23,000 recorded at the 2000 Census.

'}
Weatherhead East Asian Institute (Q7978293)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI) at Columbia University is a community of scholars affiliated with Columbia's schools, bringing together over 50 full-time faculty, a diverse group of visiting scholars and professionals, and students from the United States and abroad. Its mission is to train new generations of experts on East Asian topics in the humanities, social sciences, and the professions and to enhance understanding of East Asia in the wider community. Since its establishment in 1949 as the East Asian Institute, the WEAI has been the center for modern and contemporary East Asia research, studies, and publication at Columbia, covering China, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea, Mongolia (Inner Asia), Tibet, and, increasingly, the countries of Southeast Asia.\n

"}
West End Bar (Q7985067)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West End Bar, also known for a time as the "West End Gate", was located on Broadway near 114th Street in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City. From its establishment in 1911, the bar served as a popular gathering place for Columbia University students, faculty and administration (its slogan was "Where Columbia Had Its First Beer"). The bar was also a meeting place for many Beat Generation writers as well as many 1960\'s student activists when they attended the university.\n

'}
West End Theatre (Q7985107)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Two theatres in Harlem, New York City, have been named West End Theatre. The first, of 1899, was abandoned after the foundation was built. It was on the northeast corner of 124th Street and Seventh Avenue, which is today known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

'}
West Harlem Art Fund (Q7985305)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Harlem Art Fund, Inc. is a seventeen-year-old, public art and preservation organization based in the City of New York. The Founder/Executive Director is Savona Bailey-McClain.\n

'}
West Side Stadium (Q7986524)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Side Stadium (also known as the New York Sports and Convention Center) was a proposed football and Olympic stadium to be built on a platform over the rail yards on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City.

'}
WNYE (Q7953684)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNYE (91.5 MHz) is a non-commercial educational FM radio station licensed to New York City. WNYE is operated by NYC Media, a division of the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, along with WNYE-TV (channel 25). WNYE's studios are located at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center at 365 Fifth Avenue, while its transmitter is located at the former Condé Nast Building. Because its funding comes from the City of New York, WNYE is different from most non-commercial radio stations in that it does not ask for listener donations and it airs no fund drives.\n

"}
WPLJ (Q7954358)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WPLJ (95.5 FM) is a non-commercial Contemporary Christian music radio station licensed to serve New York City. The station is owned by the Educational Media Foundation (EMF) and services the New York metropolitan area as the New York City network affiliate for K-Love. WPLJ's transmitter is located at the Empire State Building, and broadcasts over four HD Radio subchannels in addition to its analog transmission. It is one of a handful of non-commercial radio stations in the United States that operate outside of the recommended frequency range for FM radio stations of its type (88.1\xa0MHz-91.9\xa0MHz).\n

"}
WWPR-FM (Q7957424)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WWPR-FM (105.1 FM), better known as Power 105.1, is an Urban contemporary radio station licensed to New York City. WWPR-FM is owned by iHeartMedia and broadcasts from studios in the former AT&T Building in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan; its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building. The station is the flagship station of the nationally syndicated morning show, The Breakfast Club.\n

'}
Wall Street Historic District (Q7962614)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wall Street Historic District in New York City includes part of Wall Street and parts of nearby streets in the Financial District in lower Manhattan. It includes 65 contributing buildings and one contributing structure over a 63-acre (25\xa0ha) listed area.

'}
West Side Community Garden (Q7986500)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Side Community Garden is a privately owned park in Manhattan, New York City, United States. It is located between West 89th Street and West 90th Street in the middle of the block between Amsterdam Avenue and Columbus Avenue.

'}
WNYE-TV (Q7953688)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNYE-TV, virtual channel 25 (UHF digital channel 24), is a non-commercial independent television station licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is operated by NYC Media, a division of the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, and is sister to public radio station WNYE (91.5 FM). The two stations share studios at the City University of New York's Graduate Center in midtown Manhattan; WNYE-TV's transmitter is located at the Condé Nast Building.\n

"}
WPXN-TV (Q7954573)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WPXN-TV, virtual channel 31 (UHF digital channel 34), is an Ion Television owned-and-operated station licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by West Palm Beach, Florida-based Ion Media Networks (the former Paxson Communications). WPXN-TV's offices are located on Seventh Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, and its transmitter is located at One World Trade Center.\n

"}
WXNY-FM (Q7957811)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WXNY-FM (96.3 FM La X 96.3) is a commercial radio station that broadcasts a Spanish language format. It is licensed to New York City, and serves the New York metropolitan area. WXNY is owned by Uforia Audio Network and its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
West Fourth Street Courts (Q7985184)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The West Fourth Street Courts, also known as "The Cage", are a notable public athletic venue for amateur basketball in New York City\'s Greenwich Village. "The Cage" has become one of the most important tournament sites for the citywide "Streetball" amateur basketball tournament, and is noted for its non-regulation size.\n

'}
14th Street – Eighth Avenue (Q2612959)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

14th Street/Eighth Avenue is an underground New York City Subway station complex shared by the IND Eighth Avenue Line and the BMT Canarsie Line. It is located at Eighth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan, and served by the:\n

'}
Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith (Q2617023)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith is a Oneness Pentecostal church with headquarters in Manhattan. It was founded in 1919 by Robert C. Lawson.\n

'}
Wallack's Theatre (Q7962962)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Four New York City theaters have borne the name Wallack's Theatre. Each has had other names before or after, or both. All are demolished.\n

"}
Warren Street (Q7970508)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Warren Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line in the New York City Subway System. It had three tracks, one island platform and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It opened on February 14, 1870 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was Barclay Street The next southbound express stop was Cortlandt Street. The next northbound local stop was Franklin Street. The next northbound express stop was Desbrosses Street.\n

'}
Webster Hotel (Q7978932)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Webster Hotel is located in New York City. The building was built in 1902 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 7, 1984. It was designed by the architectural firm of Tracy and Swartwout, and built in the Classical Revival style.\n

'}
Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Q7980201)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (WCGS) (formerly known as the Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences) is a graduate college of Cornell University that was founded in 1952 as an academic partnership between two major medical institutions in New York City: the Weill Cornell Medical College and the Sloan Kettering Institute. Cornell is involved in the Tri-Institutional MD-PhD Program with Rockefeller University and the Sloan Kettering Institute; each of these three institutions is part of a large biomedical center extending along York Avenue between 65th and 72nd Streets on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.\n

'}
West Presbyterian Church (Q7986297)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

West Presbyterian Church was a congregation and two houses of worship in Manhattan, New York City. The congregation was founded in 1829, and merged in 1911 with Park Presbyterian Church to form West-Park Presbyterian Church. The first house of worship, also known as the Carmine Street Presbyterian Church, in Greenwich Village, was used from 1832 to 1865, and the second, on West 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue, from 1865 until 1911, when it was sold and demolished. Proceeds from the sale were used, in accordance with the merger agreement, to build and endow a church for an underserved neighborhood, Washington Heights: Fort Washington Presbyterian Church. In addition, the West Church congregation had earlier established two mission churches which eventually merged to become Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church. West-Park, Fort Washington, and Good Shepherd-Faith are all active today.\n

'}
Fiorello H. La Guardia (Q22022481)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

An outdoor 1994 sculpture of Fiorello H. La Guardia by Neil Estern is installed in Greenwich Village, New York City in front of the Center for Architecture at 536 LaGuardia Place.

'}
Pavel Zoubok Gallery (Q22329592)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Pavel Zoubok Gallery is an art gallery in New York City. Founded in 1997 by Pavel Zoubok, the gallery's program focuses on collage, assemblage, and mixed media installation.

"}
Plaza Lafayette (Q23092002)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Plaza Lafayette is a small, 0.09-acre (0.036\xa0ha) park and surrounding streets in the Hudson Heights neighborhood of Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York City. Named after the Marquis de Lafayette, the French hero of the American Revolution, the park is roughly trapezoidal in shape, and is bounded by Riverside Drive – originally called Boulevard Lafayette in this area – on the west, the westbound lane of West 181st Street – also called "Plaza Lafayette" here – on the north, the eastbound lane of West 181st Street/Plaza Lafayette on the south, and Haven Avenue on the east. The land was acquired by the city on February 23, 1918.

'}
903 Park Avenue (Q20880543)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

903 Park Avenue is a 17-story residential building on Park Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
625 Park Avenue (Q22329556)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

625 Park Avenue is a co-op residential building in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side at the intersection of East 65th Street and Park Avenue. It is noted for its spacious residences, well-known residents, and having the only triplex apartment in the classic pre-War Buildings of the Upper East Side.\n

"}
American Copper Buildings (Q23091367)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

American Copper Buildings (originally known as 626 First Avenue) is a dual-tower residential skyscraper in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The building was developed by JDS Development and Largo and was designed by SHoP Architects. The building is one of several major collaborations between JDS and SHoP; others include 111 West 57th Street, also in Manhattan, as well as 9 DeKalb Avenue in Brooklyn.

'}
Holland House (Q23091783)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Holland House was a New York City hotel located at 274–276 Fifth Avenue at the southwest corner of 30th Street in NoMad, Manhattan, New York City, with a frontage of 250 feet (76\xa0m) on Fifth Avenue. The architects and designers were George Edward Harding and William T. Gooch. A mercantile building by the 1920s, in the present day, it is a loft building.

'}
Riverboat coffee house (Q23461911)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Riverboat Coffee House was a Canadian coffeehouse located at 134 Yorkville Avenue in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was a key venue for folk rock music and singer songwriter music made famous for featuring high-profile acts, and is considered to be "the best-known coffee house in Canada." It opened in October 1964 and closed on June 25, 1978.

'}
Millinery Center Synagogue (Q21016055)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Millinery Center Synagogue is a Jewish Orthodox synagogue located in the Garment District of New York City.

'}
BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (Q22060938)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center is a performing arts venue located in Lower Manhattan inside the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) on 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY. Tribeca's two main theater spaces are Theatre One (a 913-seat theater) and Theatre Two (which is 262 seats), both of which can be rented out. The venue's programming includes music concerts, children's theater, stand-up acts, film retrospectives as well as local and international dance companies. It has also been one of the venues for the annual Tribeca Film Festival.\n

"}
St. John's Episcopal Hospital (Q22061077)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The St. John's Episcopal Hospital was a sectarian hospital in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Central Brooklyn. It is a major teaching affiliate of the State University of New York Downstate Medical School.\n

"}
550 Park Avenue (Q22329555)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

550 Park Avenue is a luxury apartment building on Park Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, United States.

'}
Lovejoy's Hotel (Q23091906)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Lovejoy's Hotel was a New York City hotel from the 1830s through 1870. It was located at the corner of Park Row and Beekman Street in a six-story building in the Civic Center neighborhood of Manhattan. The Astor House hotel was opposite it.\n

"}
New Ohio Theatre (Q21016067)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New Ohio Theatre is a performance venue in the West Village of New York City. Located at 154 Christopher Street, the theater was established by Robert Lyons. After losing the lease on his Soho space for the Ohio Theater in 2010, Lyons moved to the Archive building in the West Village. It is an Off-Off-Broadway theater.

'}
18 Gramercy Park (Q21402642)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

18 Gramercy Park is a 19-story historic building in Manhattan, New York City, USA. Built as a hotel in 1927 and designed by the architectural firm Murgatroyd & Ogden, it was a women's temporary residence owned by The Salvation Army from 1963 to 2008. It was then known as the Parkside Evangeline. In 2010, The Salvation Army sold the building to Eastgate Realty for US$60 million. The investors were the Zeckendorf family and Israeli billionaire Eyal Ofer. In 2012, the building was redesigned by Robert A.M. Stern Architects as a luxury 16-unit condominium building.

"}
720 Park Avenue (Q22060924)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

720 Park Avenue is a historic residential building in Lenox Hill on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, USA. A cooperative, the building has 34 apartments, a gymnasium and storage spaces. It is secured by a full-time doorman.

'}
730 Park Avenue (Q22060926)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

730 Park Avenue is a historic residential building in Lenox Hill on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, USA. A cooperative, the building has 38 apartments.

'}
Church of St. Clement Mary Hofbauer (Q22025536)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Church of St. Clement Mary Hofbauer was a parish church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York which was located in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of New York City. Founded in 1909, the parish was closed in the late 1960s. Since 1984, the church building has been occupied by Metro Baptist Church.

"}
Zieher Smith & Horton (Q22080163)
{'lang': , 'extract': '


ZieherSmith is a New York City contemporary art gallery run by Andrea Smith Zieher and Scott Zieher.

'}
Kappo Masa Restaurant (Q22329584)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Kappo Masa is a Japanese restaurant located within the Gagosian Gallery, on Madison Avenue, in the Upper East Side neighborhood of New York City.\n

'}
Silk Building (Q22329599)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Silk Building is a building located at 14 East 4th Street in the NoHo neighborhood of New York City. It has 12 floors that contain 55 apartments. It takes up a whole city block on 4th Street and stretches between Broadway and Lafayette with entrances on both streets.\n

'}
Hotel Paris (Q23035375)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hotel Paris is a historic residential building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, USA.\n

'}
Murray Hill Hotel (Q22023355)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Murray Hill Hotel was a hotel situated at 112 Park Avenue in Murray Hill, Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1884, with 600 rooms and two courtyards, it was demolished in 1947. It was part of the Bowman-Biltmore Hotels chain.\n

'}
Broadway Theatre (Q22329560)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Broadway Theatre near 41st Street was a Manhattan theatre in operation from 1888 to 1929. It was located at 1445 Broadway.\n

'}
Millennium Park (Q22023245)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Millennium Park is a small plaza located at the intersection of Park Row and Broadway in Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. Located to the south of City Hall Park, it is a Greenstreet site designed to replicate a forest amid a busy intersection. The plaza contains a bus turnaround loop, formerly a paved median transformed into a green space at the turn of the 21st century.\n

'}
Tetsu (Q22329608)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tetsu is a modern Japanese restaurant conceived by Michelin-starred chef Masa Takayama, Tetsu serves a Robatayaki-based menu with an emphasis upon grilled fare. The first location opened in the Aria Resort & Casino on the Las Vegas Strip in 2012, replacing Chef Takayama's Shaboo, which had occupied the space since 2009. In November 2017 a second branch opened in the Tribeca neighborhood of New York City. The New York location features a casual ground floor space for a la carte dining, and a separate cellar space named Basement which will serve fixed-price omakase meals.

"}
825 Fifth Avenue (Q23091372)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

825 Fifth Avenue is a luxury apartment building located on Fifth Avenue between East 63rd and East 64th Streets in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built by the Paterno Brothers.\n

'}
1989 Gramercy Park asbestos steam explosion (Q23091333)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On August 19, 1989, a large steam explosion in front of a residential building generated a large asbestos containing steam cloud in the Gramercy Park neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Two people\xa0– a Con Ed worker and a 3rd floor resident\xa0– died instantly, and 24 were injured; a third person, another Con Ed worker, died the following day. Two hundred people were displaced for months while cleanup crews worked to remove asbestos containing mud from building facades. All apartments were remediated by certified asbestos workers and tested for asbestos in air.\n

'}
Red Door (Q23092027)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Red Door is a 2,000 SF event and music space located in the heart of Chelsea, New York City that has remained private to the public for the last 37 years. Its name changed over the years, but always based on the colors of the front door (previous incarnations were Green Door and Purple Door). The venue attracted a wide array of celebrities and personalities in the music and entertainment world.

'}
The Family (Q22703976)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Family is an outdoor bronze sculpture by American artist and educator Chaim Gross, installed at the Bleecker Playground in Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Latting Observatory (Q3348376)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Latting Observatory was a wooden tower in New York City built as part of the 1853 Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations, adjoining the New York Crystal Palace. It was located on the North side of 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue across the street from the site of present-day Bryant Park. Conceived by Waring Latting and designed by architect William Naugle, the observatory was an octagonally-based, iron-braced wooden tower 315 feet (96\xa0m) high adjoining the Crystal Palace, with landings at three levels on the structure, allowing visitors to see east into Queens, south into Staten Island, and west into New Jersey. The tower, taller than the spire of Trinity Church at 290 feet (88\xa0m), was the tallest structure in New York City from the time it was constructed in 1853 until it was shortened in 1855. The tower's base was a 75-foot (23\xa0m) square, tapering to a top of 6 to 8 feet (1.8 to 2.4\xa0m). It could handle up to 1,500 people at a time. It burnt down in 1856.\n

"}
Mercer Street (Q3306319)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mercer Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs north to south through the NoHo and SoHo neighborhoods, from East 8th Street past West Houston Street to Canal Street. The street was previously called First Street and Clermont Street, but was renamed in 1799 for Hugh Mercer, an American brigadier general who died at the Battle of Princeton, which came about due to his advice to George Washington to march on Princeton.

'}
Metropolitan College of New York (Q3307468)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Metropolitan College of New York (MCNY), formerly Audrey Cohen College, is a private college in New York City. MCNY consists of three schools: The Audrey Cohen School for Human Services and Education, the School for Public Affairs and Administration, and the School for Business.

'}
Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (Q3328431)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (MoCCA) is a not-for-profit arts organization and former museum in New York, USA, devoted to comic books, comic strips and other forms of cartoon art. MoCCA sponsored events ranging from book openings to educational programs in New York City schools, and hosted classes, workshops and lectures. MoCCA was perhaps best known for its annual small-press comic convention, known as MoCCA Fest, first held in 2002.\n

'}
960 Fifth Avenue (Q40151582)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

960 Fifth Avenue, also known as 3 East 77th Street, is an apartment building on Fifth Avenue on the northeast corner of East 77th Street in Manhattan, New York. It is considered one of New York City\'s "A-plus" buildings and signifies "that you are wealthy and social, that you have made it to the pinnacle of what many consider world society."

'}
New York Cotton Exchange (Q3274340)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York Cotton Exchange (NYCE) is a commodities exchange founded in 1870 by a group of one hundred cotton brokers and merchants at 1 Hanover Square in New York City. In 1998, the New York Board of Trade (NYBOT) became the parent company of the New York Cotton Exchange, and it is now owned by IntercontinentalExchange (ICE). Since 2003, its headquarters and trading facility have been in the New York Mercantile Exchange Building.\n

'}
Patchin Place (Q3368666)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Patchin Place is a gated cul-de-sac located off of 10th Street between Greenwich Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Its ten 3-story brick row houses, said to have been originally built as housing for the Basque staff of the nearby Brevoort House hotel, have been home to several famous writers, including Theodore Dreiser, E. E. Cummings, John Cowper Powys and Djuna Barnes, making it a stop on Greenwich Village walking tours. Today it is a popular location for psychotherapists' offices.

"}
First Roumanian-American congregation (Q3123498)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The First Roumanian-American Congregation, also known as Congregation Shaarey Shomayim (Hebrew: שַׁעֲרֵי שָׁמַיִם, "Gates of Heaven"), or the Roumanishe Shul (Yiddish for "Romanian synagogue"), was an Orthodox Jewish congregation that, for over 100 years, occupied a historic building at 89–93 Rivington Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York.\n

'}
Manhattantown (Q3285828)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Manhattantown, now known as Park West Village or West Park Apartments, was a massive urban renewal project in Manhattan Valley, formerly Bloomingdale District, in New York City west of Central Park. It was funded by Title I of the Housing Act of 1949, which financed slum clearance under urban redevelopment initiatives. Allegations of corruption were leveled soon after the project's inception in the spring of 1949, culminating in hearings in the Senate's Banking and Currency Committee in 1954.\n

"}
New York University College of Nursing (Q3339067)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing (commonly referred to as Rory Meyers) offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nursing and clinical experience.\n

'}
Pearl Street Station (Q3373852)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Pearl Street Station was the first commercial central power plant in the US. It was located at 255-257 Pearl Street in Manhattan on a site measuring 50 by 100 feet (15 by 30\xa0m), just south of Fulton Street and fired by coal. It began with six dynamos, and it started generating electricity on September 4, 1882, serving an initial load of 400 lamps at 82 customers. By 1884, Pearl Street Station was serving 508 customers with 10,164 lamps. The station was built by the Edison Illuminating Company, under the direction of Francis Upton, hired by Thomas Edison. \n

'}
Roxy NYC (Q3445725)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Roxy (sometimes Roxy NYC) was a popular nightclub located at 515 West 18th Street in New York City. Located in the Chelsea section of Manhattan, it began as a roller skating rink and roller disco in 1978, founded by Steve Bauman, Richard Newhouse and Steve Greenberg. It was acquired in 1985 by Gene DiNino. The Roxy shut down permanently in March 2007.\n

'}
collapse of the World Trade Center (Q62179)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The original World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, New York City was destroyed during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, after being struck by two hijacked commercial airliners. One World Trade Center (WTC 1) the "North Tower" was hit at 8:46\xa0a.m. Eastern time and collapsed at 10:28\xa0a.m. Two World Trade Center (WTC 2) the "South Tower" was hit at 9:02\xa0a.m. and collapsed at 9:59\xa0a.m. The resulting debris severely damaged or destroyed more than a dozen other adjacent and nearby structures, ultimately leading to the collapse of Seven World Trade Center at 5:21\xa0p.m.\n

'}
Jazz at Lincoln Center (Q3123802)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Jazz at Lincoln Center is part of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. The organization was founded in 1987 and opened in October 2004. Wynton Marsalis is the artistic director and the leader of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.\n

'}
International Freedom Center (Q3153256)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The International Freedom Center (IFC) was a proposed museum to be located adjacent to the site of Ground Zero at the former World Trade Center in New York City, USA. It was selected in 2004 to comprise a "cultural space" near to the memorial for victims of the September 11 attacks, called Reflecting Absence.\n

'}
Irving Plaza (Q3154621)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Irving Plaza (known through sponsorship as Irving Plaza, powered by Klipsch and formerly known as the Fillmore New York at Irving Plaza) is a ballroom-style music venue located within the Union Square neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City.\n

'}
Smalls Paradise (Q3486832)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Smalls Paradise (often called Small's Paradise and Smalls' Paradise, and not to be confused with Smalls Jazz Club), was a nightclub in Harlem, New York City. Located in the basement of 2294 Seventh Avenue, it opened in 1925 and was owned by Ed Smalls (né Edwin Alexander Smalls; 1882–1976). At the time of the Harlem Renaissance, Smalls Paradise was the only one of the well-known Harlem night clubs to be owned by an African-American and integrated. Other major Harlem night clubs admitted only white patrons unless the person was an African-American celebrity.\n

"}
Area code 917 (Q3150310)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Area code 917 is a telephone area code in the North American Numbering Plan for the five boroughs of New York City: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. It is an overlay code to all numbering plan areas (NPAs) in the city, and was intended to serve cellular, pager, and voicemail applications in the city, a restriction that was subsequently ruled impermissible by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) while grandfathering that use in New York City. Indeed, area code 917 is also assigned to landlines predominantly in Manhattan, to relieve the particularly severe shortage of numbers there.\n

'}
WNET (Q3120960)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WNET, virtual channel 13 (VHF digital channel 12), branded on-air as THIRTEEN, is the primary Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) member television station for the New York City market, licensed to Newark, New Jersey, United States. Owned by WNET.org (formerly known as the Educational Broadcasting Corporation), it is sister to the area's secondary PBS member, Garden City, New York-licensed WLIW (channel 21), and two Class A stations which share spectrum with WNET: WNDT-CD (channel 14) and WMBQ-CD (channel 46); through an outsourcing agreement, WNET.org also operates New Jersey's PBS state network NJTV and the website NJ Spotlight. WNET and WLIW share studios at One Worldwide Plaza in Midtown Manhattan with an auxiliary street-level studio in the Lincoln Center complex on Manhattan's Upper West Side; the two stations also share transmitter facilities at One World Trade Center.

"}
Millennium High School (Q3180851)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Millennium High School is a selective public high school for grades 9 through 12 in Manhattan. It is operated by the New York City Department of Education in Region 9 and is ranked 77th within New York State and 688th nationwide by the U.S. News. The Phoenix is the school's mascot, meant to symbolize the school rising from the ashes of the World Trade Center following the September 11 attacks. In 2016, the school received more than 6,000 applications for 170 seats, yielding an acceptance rate of less than 3%. Admission to MHS is based on selective criteria including a middle school GPA of 90 or above, attendance, State test scores in reading and math\n

"}
United Nations Association of the United States of America (Q3349698)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNA-USA) is a grassroots organization dedicated to supporting the United Nations. UNA-USA advocates for US leadership at the UN, connects the mission and work of the UN to schools and communities across the US, and works with a wide range of partners to advance the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. UNA-USA is a program of the United Nations Foundation and is a member of the World Federation of United Nations Associations.\n

"}
WNYL (Q3431439)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WNYL is an FM radio station licensed to New York City and owned by Entercom. WNYL broadcasts an Alternative rock format branded as "Alt 92.3", with studios located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Manhattan and transmitter located at the Empire State Building.\n

'}
Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (Q3453386)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Rusk Rehabilitation is the world's first and among the largest university-affiliated academic centers devoted entirely to inpatient/outpatient care, research, and training in rehabilitation medicine for both adults and pediatric patients. The system is part of the NYU Langone Medical Center and operated under the auspices of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of the New York University School of Medicine. The Rusk Institute is named in honor of its founder, Howard A. Rusk. \n

"}
Area code 212 (Q3150162)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Area codes 212, 646, and 332 are area codes in the North American Numbering Plan for most of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. By area, it is one of the smallest numbering plan areas (NPAs). These area codes are overlaid by area code 917, which covers the entirety of New York City.\n

'}
Sony Music Studios (Q3116865)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Sony Music Studios was a former music recording and mastering facility in New York City. The five story building was a music and broadcasting complex that was located at 460 W. 54th Street, at 10th Avenue, in the Hell's Kitchen section of Manhattan. It opened in 1993, and closed in August 2007.\n

"}
American Bank Note Company Building (Q3208373)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Bank Note Company Building is a historical building located at 70 Broad Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The former headquarters of the American Bank Note Company, it sits at the corner of Beaver Street, near Bowling Green.\n

'}
2017 Lower Manhattan attack (Q42440670)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

On October 31, 2017, a man drove a rented pickup truck into cyclists and runners for about one mile (1.6 kilometers) of the Hudson River Park's bike path alongside West Street from Houston Street south to Chambers Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The vehicle-ramming attack killed eight people, six of whom were foreign tourists, and injured eleven others. After crashing the truck into a school bus, the driver exited, apparently wielding two guns (later found to be a paintball gun and a pellet gun). He was shot in the abdomen by a policeman and arrested. A flag and a document indicating allegiance to the terrorist group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) were found in the truck.

"}
La Maison Française (Q3210324)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

La Maison Française NYU is one of New York University's International Houses, located on its Washington Square campus. Since 1957, La Maison Française has served as a forum for French-American cultural and intellectual exchange, offering contemporary perspectives on French and Francophone issues. Its lectures, symposia, concerts, screenings, exhibitions, and special events provides a resource to the university community, as well as the general public.\n

"}
Elgin Botanical Garden (Q44646444)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Elgin Botanic Garden was the first public botanical garden in the United States, established in 1801 by New York physician David Hosack. By 1810, Hosack was no longer able to fund the garden's expenses, and sold the land to the State of New York. The property was given to Columbia College in 1814, and the gardens were abandoned. In the 1920s, it became the site of Rockefeller Center.

"}
2017 Port Authority Bus Terminal explosion (Q45272383)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On December 11, 2017, a pipe bomb partially detonated in the subway station adjoining the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, injuring four people including the suspect. Mayor Bill de Blasio described the incident as "an attempted terrorist attack". The suspected bomber was identified by police as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah, a Salafi Muslim immigrant from Bangladesh.

'}
P.P.O.W Gallery (Q51281657)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

PPOW Gallery, stylized P·P·O·W, is a contemporary art gallery located in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The gallery was founded in 1983 in the East Village by Wendy Olsoff and Penny Pilkington. The gallery features artists central to the 1980s East Village art scene as well as political art, often by women, people of color, and LGBT artists.

'}
Garrick Cinema (Q45102217)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Garrick Cinema—periodically referred to as the New Andy Warhol Garrick Theatre, Andy Warhol's Garrick Cinema, Garrick Theatre, Nickelodeon—was a 199-seat movie house located in Greenwich Village at 152 Bleecker Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City. Andy Warhol debuted many of his notable films (including Bike Boy (1967), Blue Movie (1969), Flesh (1968), Lonesome Cowboys (1968), Loves of Ondine (1967) and others) in this building (as well as in other area theaters, including the 55th Street Playhouse) in the late 1960s. The Cafe Au Go Go was located in the basement of the theater building in the late 1960s, and was a prominent Greenwich Village night club, featuring many well known musical groups, folksingers and comedy acts.\n

"}
55th Street Playhouse (Q45103507)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 55th Street Playhouse—periodically referred to as the 55th Street Cinema and Europa Theatre—was a 253-seat movie house at 154 West 55th Street, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, that opened on May 20, 1927. Many classic art and foreign-language films, including those by Jean Cocteau, Sergei Eisenstein, Federico Fellini, Abel Gance, Fritz Lang, and Orson Welles, were featured at the theater. Later, Andy Warhol presented many of his notable films (including Flesh (1968) and Lonesome Cowboys (1968) and others) in this building (as well as in other area theaters, including the New Andy Warhol Garrick Theatre) in the late 1960s. Other notable films were also shown at the theater, including Boys in the Sand (1971) and Him (1974).

'}
American Thread Building (Q4745252)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Thread Building is a historic building located at 260 West Broadway on the corner of Beach Street in the TriBeCa neighborhood of lower Manhattan, New York City. The eleven story building was designed in the Renaissance Revival style by architect William B. Tubby, and built in 1896. It was originally known as the Wool Exchange Building, and owned by the Wool Warehouse Company. The wool company did not succeed and the building was acquired by the American Thread Company in 1907, and was renovated and converted into live/work lofts in 1981.

'}
Ann Street (Q4766689)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ann Street is a 3-block-long street located in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan. It runs roughly east to west from Broadway to Gold Street.\n

'}
Area (Q4788509)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nArea was a themed nightclub that operated from 1983 to 1987 at 157 Hudson Street in Manhattan, New York City. The club was known for its unusual invitations.

'}
Art in General (Q4797206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Art in General is a non-profit contemporary art exhibition space in New York City. Founded in 1981 by artists Martin Weinstein and Teresa Liszka in the General Hardware building—hence "Art in General.", Art in General’s mission is to assist artists with the production and presentation of new work, changing in response to artists’ needs and informing and engaging the public about their work. Laurel Ptak currently serves as the organization\'s Executive Director.

'}
Art Projects International (Q4797024)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Art Projects International is a contemporary art gallery located in TriBeCa, New York City. It focuses on works of art by leading contemporary artists with diverse international backgrounds.

'}
Astor Library (Q4811069)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Astor Library was a free public library in the East Village, Manhattan, developed primarily through the collaboration of New York City merchant John Jacob Astor and New England educator and bibliographer Joseph Cogswell. It was primarily meant as a research library, and its books did not circulate. It opened to the public in 1854, and in 1895 consolidated with the Lenox Library and the Tilden Foundation to become the New York Public Library (NYPL). During this time, its building was expanded twice, in 1859, and 1881.\n

'}
Atlah Worldwide Church (Q4815950)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

ATLAH World Missionary Church (formerly Bethelite Missionary Baptist Church) is a Christian church and ministry located in Harlem, New York. James David Manning is the chief pastor. The church campus is the site of the unaccredited ATLAH Theological Seminary, where classes are offered on preaching and prophecy. The church also has a studio that Manning uses for his Internet radio program The Manning Report. The church's YouTube channel had over 72,000 subscribers as of March 2018 but was shut down by YouTube later that year.

"}
Art International Radio (Q4796896)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Art International Radio was an online, non-profit cultural Internet radio station that was also home to the Clocktower Gallery an historic New York City alternative exhibition space. Art International Radio was directed by Alanna Heiss, the founder and former Director of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Long Island City, Queens. In December 2013, after 40 years of operation from its historic 1894 McKim, Mead & White building in Lower Manhattan, the Clocktower announced its final exhibition and plans for relocation through a year of creative collaborations with partner organizations all over New York City.

'}
Angels & Kings (Q4763025)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Angels & Kings was a nightclub in New York City, New York, located at 500 East 11th Street. The club was opened in 2007 by Fall Out Boy bassist Pete Wentz and Jamison Ernest of Yellow Fever, and is owned by several other musicians, including members of Gym Class Heroes, Cobra Starship, and The Academy Is.... It was also known as AK-47. Wentz has stated that he opened the bar in order for he and his friends to have a place to hang out.\n

'}
Apollo Theatre (Q4780357)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Apollo Theatre was a Broadway theatre whose entrance was located at 223 West 42nd Street in Manhattan, New York City, while the theatre proper was on 43rd Street. It was demolished in 1996 and provided part of the site for the new Ford Center, now known as the Lyric Theatre.\n

'}
Appleton Building (Q4781391)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Appleton Building occupied the front of a small block which was bounded by Broadway (Manhattan), Leonard Street, and Catharine Alley in New York City. It stood at 346 and 348 Broadway, was four stories tall, and was constructed entirely of brown stone. It was a familiar landmark in a quickly changing Broadway of the mid-19th century. It was one of Broadway's oldest buildings.\n

"}
Ars Nova (New York theater) (Q4796315)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ars Nova is an Off-Broadway, non-profit theater in New York City’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood. Ars Nova develops and produces theater, comedy and music created by artists in the early stages of their careers.\n

'}
Artists' Choice Museum (Q4801292)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Artists’ Choice Museum in New York City was started in 1976 by many of the same younger artists who were active in the Alliance of Figurative Artists and the Figurative Coops. First exhibition, a survey of 146 contemporary figurative artists was selected and organized by the artists of the Green Mountain, Bowery, Prince Street and First Street Galleries - although it was a broad survey and did not exhibit just artists from those galleries. After the first show older artists were brought into its structure. Other group shows followed in clusters of galleries on 57th street and in museums: “Benefit Exhibit” in 1979 (40 artists), “Younger Artists: Benefit Exhibit” in 1980 (61 artists),“Intimate Visions” in 1982 (14 artists), “Narrative Sculpture” in 1982 (12 Artists), “Painted Light” in 1983 (90 artists) and “Bodies and Souls” in 1983 (156 artists) to name some. \nBy 1980 The Museum was publishing a bimonthly newsletter and by 1982 a magazine. By 1984 the Museum finally had a home; a building on West Broadway. This space only lasted until 1986 when the organization ceased to exist.\n

'}
Comedy Cellar (Q4819193)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Comedy Cellar is a comedy club in Manhattan where many top New York comedians perform. It was founded in 1982 by then stand-up comedian, and current television writer/producer Bill Grundfest. It is located in the heart of Greenwich Village on 117 Macdougal Street between West 3rd Street and Minetta Lane. Above the club is a restaurant called The Olive Tree Cafe to which it is connected, where many of the comedians hang out after performing. The club is owned by Noam Dworman, who inherited it from his late father, Manny, and ran by booker Estee Adoram, who has developed the club’s talent for nearly four decades. The businesses share the same menu, kitchen, and staff.\n

'}
American Musical and Dramatic Academy (Q4744555)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA) is a private college conservatory for the performing arts located in New York City and Los Angeles, California. The conservatory offers both Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees and two-year Certificates in Professional Performance. Programs are offered in Acting, Musical Theatre, Dance and Performing Arts. It is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theatre.\n

'}
Americas Society (Q4745666)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Americas Society is an organization dedicated to education, debate, and dialogue on the Americas and is located at 680 Park Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The Americas Society was established by David Rockefeller in 1965. The Americas Society promotes the understanding of the economic, political, and social issues confronting Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; its mission is "to increase public awareness and appreciation of the diverse cultural heritage of the Americas and the importance of the inter-American relationship."

'}
Ansche Chesed (Q4770536)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ansche Chesed is a synagogue on the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan.\n

'}
Appellate Division Courthouse of New York State (Q4781005)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Appellate Division Courthouse of New York State, First Department (also known as Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York) is a historic court house located at 35 East 25th Street at the corner of Madison Avenue, across from Madison Square Park, in Manhattan, New York City. The building is three stories, with a basement; the central entrance faces 25th Street.

'}
Apthorp Farm (Q4782245)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Apthorp Farm that lay on Manhattan\'s Upper West Side straddled the old Bloomingdale Road, laid out in 1728, which was re-surveyed as The "Boulevard" – now Upper Broadway. It was the largest block of real estate remaining from the "Bloomingdale District", a rural suburb of 18th-century New York City. Legal disputes between the eventual heirs of the Loyalist Charles Ward Apthorp and purchasers of parcels of real estate held in abeyance the speculative development of the area between 89th and 99th Streets, from Central Park to the Hudson River until final judgment was awarded in July 1910; at that time the New York Times estimated its worth at $125,000,000.

'}
Arthur Curtiss James House (Q4798379)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Arthur Curtiss James House was a mansion located on 39 East 69th Street in New York City. It was constructed for Arthur Curtiss James.\n

'}
New Music USA (Q4744538)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

New Music USA is a new music organization formed by the merging of the American Music Center with Meet The Composer on November 8, 2011. The new organization retains the granting programs of the two former organizations as well as two media programs originally created at the American Music Center: NewMusicBox and Counterstream Radio.\n

'}
Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival (Q4806709)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival, hosted by the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans in New York City, is one of the largest outdoors celebrations of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month in the United States. Each year, in May, the festival offers music, performances, arts, food, history and corporate outreach. The first festival in 1979 grew out of the civil rights movements of that era when President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation to declare the first week in May to be Asian American Heritage Week. The proclamation was later extended to Asian Pacific American Heritage Month for the entire month of May. The festival has continued every year to celebrate the diverse cultures of Asian Americans and their contribution to American society. It has become so large that it takes the Coalition all year to put together.

'}
Asser Levy Public Baths (Q4808743)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Asser Levy Public Baths, now part of the Asser Levy Recreation Center, is a historic building located at the corner of Asser Levy Place and East 23rd Street in Kips Bay, Manhattan, New York City. It was named after Asser Levy, one of the first Jewish citizens of New York City, and a strong and influential advocate for civil liberties; it was built in 1904–06 and designed by Arnold W. Brunner and Martin Aiken of the firm Brunner & Aiken.\n

'}
Associated American Artists (Q4809147)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Associated American Artists (AAA) was an art gallery in New York City that was established in 1934 and ceased operation in 2000. The gallery marketed art to the middle and upper-middle classes, first in the form of affordable prints and later in home furnishings and accessories, and played a significant role in the growth of art as an industry.\n

'}
American Music Hall (Q4744541)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Music Hall, also known as the American Theater until 1908, was a Broadway venue, on 260 West 42nd street. It was designed by the architect Charles C. Haight, and had a capacity of 2065.\n

'}
American Jewish Historical Society (Q4744218)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS) was founded in 1892 with the mission to foster awareness and appreciation of American Jewish history and to serve as a national scholarly resource for research through the collection, preservation and dissemination of materials relating to American Jewish history.

'}
Asiate (Q4806832)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Asiate is a Contemporary American restaurant located in the Mandarin Oriental, New York hotel, on the 35th floor of 80 Columbus Circle (West 60th Street at Broadway) in Manhattan, New York City.

'}
Astor Court (Q4811052)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Astor Court, located in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, is a re-creation of a Ming Dynasty-style, Chinese-garden courtyard. It is also known as the Ming Hall (明軒).\n

'}
Astor Theatre (Q4811082)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Astor Theatre was located at 1537 Broadway, at West 45th Street in Times Square in New York City. It opened September 21, 1906, with Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream and continued to operate as a Broadway theatre until 1925. From 1925 until it closed in 1972, it was a first-run movie theater.\n

"}
New York State Psychiatric Institute (Q9008737)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York State Psychiatric Institute, located at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was established in 1895 as one of the first institutions in the United States to integrate teaching, research and therapeutic approaches to the care of patients with mental illnesses. In 1925, the Institute affiliated with Presbyterian Hospital, now NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, adding general hospital facilities to the Institute's psychiatric services and research laboratories.\n

"}
109 Prince Street (Q2806784)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

109 Prince Street at the corner of Greene Street – where it is #119 – in the SoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is a historic cast-iron building. It was built in 1882-83 and was designed by Jarvis Morgan Slade in the French Renaissance style. The cast-iron facade was provided by the architectural iron works firm of Cheney & Hewlett.\n

'}
Four Seasons Arena (Q8565100)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Four Seasons Arena is a multi-purpose indoor sports and exhibition arena located in the city of Great Falls, Montana, in the United States. Constructed in 1979, it served primarily as an ice rink until 2005. The failure of the practice rink's refrigeration system in 2003 and the management's decision to close the main rink in 2006 led to the facility's reconfiguration as an indoor sports and exhibition space. In November of 2018, the Cascade County Commission, in conjunction with the Great Falls TIBD, and the Great Falls Lodging Association began to develop a plan to replace the arena. At a cost of 86 million dollars, the proposed arena will seat between 10,000 and 12,000 people. The bond is expected to go before voters in November of 2019. As of May 2011 it is the largest exhibition, music, and sports venue in the city.\n

"}
55th Street (Q2817506)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

55th Street is a two-mile-long, one-way street traveling east to west across Midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
New York Academy of Medicine (Q2822445)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The New York Academy of Medicine (the Academy) is a health policy and advocacy organization founded in 1847 by a group of leading New York metropolitan area physicians as a voice for the medical profession in medical practice and public health reform. The early leaders of the academy were invested in the reform movements of the day and worked to improve public health by focusing on the living conditions of the poor. In 1866, the academy was instrumental in the establishment of the Metropolitan Board of Health, the first modern municipal public health authority in the United States and the precursor of today's Department of Health. In recent years the academy has functioned as an effective advocate in public health reform, as well as a major center for health education. As of 2016, the academy will celebrate its 169th year. The academy's work now focuses on advancing urban health in New York City and around the world. Today, the academy has over three-thousand fellows, that include doctors, nurses, health care administrators, and professionals in all fields dedicated to maintaining and improving health.\n

"}
Colonnade Row (Q8348030)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Colonnade Row, also known as LaGrange Terrace, on present-day Lafayette Street in New York City's NoHo neighborhood, is a landmarked series of Greek revival buildings originally built in the early 1830s. They are believed to have been built by Seth Geer, although the project has been attributed to a number of other architects. The buildings' original name comes from the Marquis de Lafayette's estate in France, but the series of nine row houses, of which four remain, owe their existence to John Jacob Astor, who bought the property and whose grandson John Jacob Astor III later lived at No. 424. The buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places under the name LaGrange Terrace and the facades remain standing on Lafayette Street south of Astor Place.

"}
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (Q8564990)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT™) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization.\n

'}
The Fitzroy (Q24192811)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fitzroy is a ten-story residential building in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The building was developed by Largo and JDS Development Group and designed by Roman and Williams, a New York City-based architecture and design team. It is the firm’s third building design, after 211 Elizabeth and the Viceroy Hotel.\n

'}
2016 New York and New Jersey bombings (Q26916567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On September 17–19, 2016, three bombs exploded and several unexploded ones were found in the New York metropolitan area. The bombings left 31 people wounded, but no fatalities or life-threatening injuries were reported.\n

'}
Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal (Q27988146)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal, also called the Essex Street Trolley Terminal or Delancey Street Trolley Terminal, was a trolley terminal located underground adjacent to the Essex Street subway station in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Passenger trolley service operated through the terminal from 1908 until 1948 when trolley service over the Williamsburg Bridge ended. The station was constructed with balloon loops for turning around streetcars after they crossed over the Williamsburg Bridge to send them back to Brooklyn.

'}
Simons Foundation (Q28148561)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Simons Foundation is a private foundation established in 1994 by Marilyn and James Harris Simons with offices in New York City. The foundation funds research in mathematics and the basic sciences.\n

'}
319 Broadway (Q29094827)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

319 Broadway, also known as the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Home Office, is a five-story office building on the corner of Broadway and Thomas Street in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is a cast-iron building in the Italianate architecture style, built in 1869–70 and designed by D. & J. Jardine. It is the lone survivor of a pair of buildings at 317 and 319 which were known as the "Thomas Twins". The cast iron for these mirror-twin buildings was provided by Daniel D. Badger\'s Architectural Iron Works. The building was designated a New York City landmark on August 29, 1989.

'}
Times Squared 3015 (Q24192478)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Times Squared 3015 is a design concept for a vertical city, more than a mile tall, located in New York City in the United States.\n

'}
Tightrope Walker (Q27919862)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tightrope Walker (sometimes Tight Rope Walker) is an outdoor bronze sculpture by Dutch artist Kees Verkade, installed on Columbia University's Revson Plaza in Upper Manhattan, New York City, in 1979. The work commemorates General William J. Donovan and depicts one figure standing atop another as he tightrope walks.

"}
Harlem Opera House (Q23091760)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Harlem Opera House was a US opera house located at 211 West 125th Street, in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. Designed by architect John B. McElfatrick, it was built in 1889 by Oscar Hammerstein; it was his first theater in the city.\n

'}
655 Park Avenue (Q28226170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

655 Park Avenue is a Georgian-style co-op residential building on Manhattan\'s Upper East Side, located on Park Avenue between 67th Street and 68th Street, adjacent to the Park Avenue Armory. It was developed in 1924 by Dwight P. Robinson & Company. The building at 655 Park Avenue was designed by architects James Edwin Ruthven Carpenter, Jr., often referred to by the initials "J.E.R. Carpenter", and Mott B. Schmidt. Carpenter is considered the leading architect for luxury residential high-rise buildings in New York City in the early 1900s, while Schmidt is known for his buildings in the American Georgian Classical style, including Sutton Place and houses for New York City\'s society figures and business elite.

'}
834 Fifth Avenue (Q2818491)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

834 Fifth Avenue is a luxury residential housing cooperative in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It is located on Fifth Avenue at the corner of East 64th Street opposite the Central Park Zoo. The limestone-clad building was designed by Rosario Candela, a prolific designer of luxury apartment buildings in Manhattan during the period between World War I and World War II. 834 Fifth Avenue is widely regarded as one of the most prestigious apartment houses in New York City. It has been called "the most pedigreed building on the snobbiest street in the country’s most real estate-obsessed city" in an article in the New York Observer newspaper. This status is due to the building\'s overall architecture, the scale and layout of the apartments, and the notoriety of its current and past residents. It is one of the finest buildings designed by Rosario Candela, according to The New York Times.

'}
Fourteenth Street Theatre (Q8565140)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fourteenth Street Theatre was a New York City theatre located at 107 West 14th Street just west of Sixth Avenue. It was designed by Alexander Saeltzer and opened in 1866 as the Theatre Francais, as a home for French language dramas and opera.

'}
79th Street (Q2818314)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

79th Street is a major two-way street on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs in two major sections: between East End and Fifth Avenues on the Upper East Side, and between Columbus Avenue and Henry Hudson Parkway on the Upper West Side. The two segments are connected by the 79th Street transverse across Central Park, as well as one block of 81st Street.\n

'}
211 Elizabeth (Q24039579)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

211 Elizabeth is a residential building located at 211 Elizabeth Street, in the Nolita neighborhood of Manhattan. It was designed by architecture and interior design firm Roman and Williams and was the organization's first full building design. The building is primarily residential, but also includes space for three separate commercial developments on the first floor. \n

"}
339 Lafayette Street (Q24192800)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

339 Lafayette Street, nicknamed the Peace Pentagon, and officially numbered 339-345, is a building in the NoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City known in the late 20th and early 21st century for the many left-wing and radical activist and political organizations headquartered there. The building was completed c.1920.

'}
70 Vestry (Q24693825)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

70 Vestry is a thirteen-story residential building under development in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan, in New York City. The building was designed by the New Classical firm Robert A.M. Stern Architects.\n

'}
1966 New York City smog (Q26832721)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 1966 New York City smog was a major air-pollution episode, during which the city's air became filled with damaging levels of several toxic pollutants. Smog covered the city and its surrounding area from November\xa023 to 26, coinciding with that year's Thanksgiving holiday weekend. It was the third major smog in New York City, following events of similar scale in 1953 and 1963.\n

"}
Fulton Market Building (Q27877316)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Fulton Market Building is a renovated building that once housed the Fulton Fish Market, on Fulton Street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. It served as the venue for the 2016 World Chess Championship.

'}
John Watts (Q27919860)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

An outdoor bronze sculpture depicting the John Watts by George Edwin Bissell is installed in the Trinity Church Cemetery outside Manhattan's Trinity Church, in the U.S. state of New York. It was erected by Watt's grandson, John Watts de Peyster, in 1893.

"}
Paul Kasmin Gallery (Q28207019)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Paul Kasmin Gallery also known as Kasmin Gallery is a New York City fine art gallery, founded in SoHo in 1989.

'}
Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation (Q28449122)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation is a nonprofit American health organization that supports research into the causes and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.\n

"}
WPAT-FM (Q3564768)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WPAT-FM (93.1 FM) – branded "93.1 Amor" – is a radio station that programs a mix of Bachata, Reggaeton and Tropical music. Licensed to Paterson, New Jersey the station is owned by the Spanish Broadcasting System and serves the New York metropolitan area. It has studios in Midtown Manhattan, and the transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

'}
Alice Tully Hall (Q3846032)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Alice Tully Hall is a concert hall at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City. It is named for Alice Tully, a New York performer and philanthropist whose donations assisted in the construction of the hall. Tully Hall is located within the Juilliard Building, a Brutalist structure, which was designed by renowned architect Pietro Belluschi, and completed and opened in 1969. Since its opening, it has hosted numerous performances and events, including the New York Film Festival. Tully Hall seats 1,086 patrons.

'}
Atlantic Studios (Q3501052)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Atlantic Studios was the recording studio of Atlantic Records. Although this recording studio was located at 1841 Broadway (at the corner of 60th Street), in New York City, Atlantic Recording Studios was initially located at 234 West 56th Street from November 1947 until mid-1956. When the Shorty Rogers and His Giants disc of 33.33 rpm called Martians Come Back! was issued in August 1956, the address of Atlantic Recording Studios had relocated to 157 W 57th Street. The studio was the first to record in stereo due to the efforts of Tom Dowd.\n

'}
Essex Street (Q4532801)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Essex Street is a north-south street on the Lower East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. North of Houston Street, the street becomes Avenue A, which goes north to 14th Street. South of Canal Street it becomes Rutgers Street, the southern end of which is at South Street.\n

'}
amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research (Q3782571)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, known until 2005 as the American Foundation for AIDS Research, is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the support of AIDS research, HIV prevention, treatment education, and the advocacy of AIDS-related public policy.\n

'}
Henry Clay Frick House (Q3784918)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Henry Clay Frick House was the residence of the industrialist and art patron Henry Clay Frick in New York City. The mansion is located between 70th and 71st Street and Fifth Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. It was constructed in 1912–1914 by Thomas Hastings of Carrère and Hastings. It was transformed into a museum in the mid-1930s and houses the Frick Collection and the Frick Art Reference Library. The house and library were designated a National Historic Landmark in 2008 for their significance in the arts and architecture as a major repository of a Gilded Age art collection.

'}
Napoleonic (Q4006212)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Napoleonic egg, sometimes referred to as the Imperial Napoleonic egg, is a Fabergé egg, one of a series of fifty-two jewelled eggs made under the supervision of Peter Carl Fabergé. It was created in 1912 for the last Tsar of Russia Nicholas II as a gift to his mother the Dowager Empress Maria Fyodorovna. The egg is part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and is currently long term installation at Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York.

'}
Washington Mews (Q4018413)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Washington Mews is a private gated street in New York City between Fifth Avenue and University Place just north of Washington Square Park. Along with MacDougal Alley and Stuyvesant Street, it was originally part of a Lenape trail which connected the Hudson and East Rivers, and was first developed as a mews (row of stables) that serviced horses from homes in the area. Since the 1950s the former stables have served as housing, offices and other facilities for New York University.\n

'}
Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier II (Q4355782)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Super Fight II was a non-title boxing match between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. The second of the three Ali–Frazier bouts, it took place at Madison Square Garden in New York City on January 28, 1974. Ali was a slight favorite to win, and did by a unanimous decision albeit a controversial one, in which Ali clinched 133 times.

'}
101 Warren Street (Q4546330)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

101 Warren Street (also known as 270 Greenwich Street) is a 35-story, 227 condominium, 163 rental apartment building in the Tribeca area of lower Manhattan, located between Greenwich Street and West Street. The project was developed by Edward J. Minskoff Equities, designed by Skidmore Owings & Merrill, and completed in 2008. The project features an "Artrium" on the fifth floor with a pine tree forest consisting of 101 trees.\n

'}
École libre des hautes études (Q3578032)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The École Libre des Hautes Études (lit. ‘Free School for Advanced Studies’) was a "university-in-exile" for French academics in New York during the Second World War. It was chartered by the French (the Free French) and Belgian governments-in-exile and located at the New School for Social Research. Its founders included Jean Wahl, Jacques Maritain, and Gustave Cohen, and it was supported by the Rockefeller Foundation.

'}
WXTV-DT (Q3564865)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WXTV-DT, virtual channel 41 (UHF digital channel 26), is a Univision owned-and-operated television station licensed to Paterson, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. It is one of two East Coast flagship stations of the Spanish-language network (alongside WLTV-DT in Miami–Fort Lauderdale, Florida). WXTV-DT is owned by the Univision Local Media subsidiary of Univision Communications, as part of a de facto triopoly with Newark, New Jersey-licensed UniMás co-flagship WFUT-DT (channel 68) and Smithtown, New York-licensed Justice Network affiliate WFTY-DT (channel 67). The three stations share studios on Frank W. Burr Boulevard in Teaneck, New Jersey; WXTV and WFUT share transmitter facilities at the Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
Scribner Building (Q3701950)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Scribner Building, also known as Old Scribner Building, was designed by Ernest Flagg in a Beaux Arts style and was built in 1893. It is located at 153-157th Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, at 21st Street. It served as the corporate headquarters of Charles Scribner's Sons publishing company.\n

"}
Wall and Hanover Building (Q3661607)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Wall and Hanover Building located at 63 Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1929. It was designed by architects Delano & Aldrich and has 37 floors.\n

'}
Helicoidal Skyscraper (Q3775869)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Helicoidal Skyscraper was a planned but never materialized, 565\xa0m (1,854\xa0ft) high business center that was to have been built on the tip of Manhattan, New York City. It was a stillborn project developed between 1968 and 1974 by Italian architect Manfredi Nicoletti. It combined its aerodynamic shape with the technology of wired bridges, for the purpose of minimizing both the loads and structural bulk.

'}
The Limelight (Q4051157)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Limelight was a chain of nightclubs that were owned and operated by Peter Gatien. The Limelight had locations in New York City, Chicago, Atlanta, London and Hallandale.\n

'}
Vineyard Theatre (Q4052705)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Vineyard Theatre is an Off-Broadway theatre company dedicated to developing and producing bold new plays and musicals by both emerging and established artists. They are committed to creating an artistic home for daring and diverse artists, to nurturing their unique voices, and to engaging audiences and community in dialogue by producing work that challenges people to see themselves and the world in new ways, pushing the boundaries of what theatre can be and do. The Vineyard is one of the country’s foremost theatre companies dedicated to the creation and production of new plays and musicals, and its artists and productions are the recipients of two Pulitzer Prizes, five Tony Awards, 23 Obie Awards, two Oppenheimer Awards, and numerous New York Drama Critics Circle, Lucille Lortel, and Drama Desk awards. It celebrated its 35th anniversary in 2017.\n

'}
Orchard Street (Q4337251)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Orchard Street is a street in Manhattan which covers the eight city blocks between Division Street in Chinatown and East Houston Street on the Lower East Side. Vehicular traffic runs north on this one-way street. Orchard Street starts from Division Street in the south and ends at East Houston Street in the north..\n

'}
Cherry Street (Q4514584)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cherry Street is a one-way street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It currently has two sections, mostly running along parks, public housing, co-op buildings, tenements, and crossing underneath the Manhattan Bridge overpass.\n

'}
University Village (Q3551347)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The University Village is a complex of three apartment buildings located in Greenwich Village in the Lower Manhattan-part of New York City. The complex is owned by New York University and was built in the 1960s as part of the University's transition to a residential college. One of the towers, 505 LaGuardia Place, is a co-op that does not house students, and the other two towers, Silver Tower I and Silver Tower II, house faculty and graduate students of NYU. The buildings were designed by modern architects James Ingo Freed and I. M. Pei, and the central-plaza contains a sculpture by Carl Nesjär and Pablo Picasso. In 2008 the complex was designated a New York City Landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

"}
Garrick Theatre (Q3848974)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Garrick Theatre was a 910-seat theatre built in 1890 and located on 67 West 35th Street New York. Designed by Francis Hatch Kimball, it was commissioned by Edward Harrigan, who also managed the theatre, originally named Harrigan's Theatre, until 1895. Richard Mansfield took over from Harrigan, renaming it the Garrick. Charles Frohman assumed management from 1896 until 1915. The Shuberts bought it in 1916 and leased it to Otto Kahn, who named it Théâtre du Vieux-Colombier, after a theatre in Paris of the same name. Kahn later gave it to the Theatre Guild and it resumed the name Garrick Theatre in 1919. The Shuberts resumed management in 1925 and the theatre closed as a playhouse in 1929. After a short run of burlesque, the building was demolished in 1932.\n

"}
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic (Q3898408)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic (PWC) was a hospital in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, which was founded by an endowment bestowed by Payne Whitney (March 20, 1876 – May 25, 1927) upon his death. Whitney was an American businessman and member of the influential Whitney family. An eight-story free-standing hospital was constructed, and was affiliated with Cornell University's medical school, now called Weill Cornell Medicine, and with New York Hospital, now New York–Presbyterian Hospital (NYP), before its opening.\n

"}
Studio Maestro (Q3500998)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Studio Maestro is a ballet school in New York City founded in 1995 by Rose Caiola. A portion of its students have graduated into ballet companies including American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, Washington Ballet, National Ballet of Croatia, Pennsylvania Ballet, National Ballet of Canada, San Francisco Ballet, Ballet de Espana.\n

'}
Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Archives (Q3514826)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nThe Tamiment Library is a research library at New York University that documents radical and left history, with strengths in the histories of communism, socialism, anarchism, the New Left, the Civil Rights Movement, and utopian experiments. The Robert F. Wagner Archives, which is also housed in Bobst Library at NYU, documents American labor history. Together the two units form an important center for scholarly research on labor and the left.\n

'}
Madison Square Garden (Q3754550)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Madison Square Garden (1879–1890) was an arena in New York City at the northeast corner of East 26th Street and Madison Avenue in Manhattan. The first venue to use that name, it seated 10,000 spectators. It was replaced with a new building on the same site.\n

'}
Niblo's Garden (Q3875796)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Niblo\'s Garden was a theater on Broadway, near Prince Street, in SoHo, Manhattan, New York City. It was established in 1823 as "Columbia Garden" which in 1828 gained the name of the Sans Souci and was later the property of the coffeehouse proprietor and caterer William Niblo. The large theater that evolved in several stages, occupying more and more of the pleasure ground, was twice burned and rebuilt. On September 12, 1866, Niblo\'s saw the premiere of The Black Crook, considered to be the first piece of musical theater that conforms to the modern notion of a "book musical".\n

'}
Allen Street (Q4062582)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Allen Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan which runs north-south through the Lower Manhattan neighborhood of Chinatown and the Lower East Side. It is continued north of Houston Street as First Avenue. South of Division Street, it is known as Pike Street to its southern terminus at South Street. The northbound and southbound roadways are separated by a meridian mall, which has two bike lanes located outside the meridian mall; each bike lane is unidirectional. The street's namesake was Master Commandant William Henry Allen, the youngest person to command a Navy ship in the War of 1812. He was killed in action at the age of 28. His exploits included the capture of the British ship HMS Macedonian.

"}
The King's College (Q3521483)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The King's College (; also TKC or simply King's) is a private Christian liberal arts college in New York City. The predecessor institution was founded in 1938 in Belmar, New Jersey, by Percy Crawford. The King's College draws more than 500 students from 37 states and 15 countries.\n

"}
Union League Club of New York (Q3549996)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Union League Club is a private social club in New York City that was founded in 1863. Its fourth and current clubhouse is located at 38 East 37th Street on the corner of Park Avenue, in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan. It was designed by Benjamin Wistar Morris and opened on February 2, 1931. The building was designated a New York City landmark on October 25, 2011. The club is considered one of the most prestigious in New York City.\n

'}
WAXQ (Q3564618)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WAXQ (104.3 FM) is a classic rock-formatted radio station licensed to New York City. WAXQ is owned by iHeartMedia and broadcasts from studios in the former AT&T Building in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan; its transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.

'}
A La Vieille Russie (Q3602929)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

A La Vieille Russie is a New York City-based antique store specializing in European and American antique jewelry, Imperial Russian works of art, 18th-century European gold snuff boxes, and objets d’art. Founded in Kiev in 1851, A La Vieille Russie later relocated to Paris around 1920 and to New York thereafter. From 1961 to 2017, the store was located at 781 Fifth Avenue, near the southeast entrance of Central Park.\n

'}
1345 Avenue of the Americas (Q3750408)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

1345 Avenue of the Americas, also known as the AllianceBernstein Building, is a 625-foot (191\xa0m)-tall, 50-story skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan New York City, New York. Located on Sixth Avenue between 54th and 55th Streets, the building was built by Fisher Brothers and designed by Emery Roth & Sons. When completed in 1969, the building was originally known as Burlington House, after Burlington Industries. \n

'}
Ludlow Street (Q3935980)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Ludlow Street runs between Houston and Division Streets on the Lower East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Vehicular traffic runs south on this one-way street.\n

'}
Thirteenth Street School (Q46873674)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Grammar School No. 35, also known as the "Thirteenth Street School" or "Ward School No. 35" was a public school on 60 West Thirteenth Street in Manhattan, New York City. It was known as one of the largest and most prestigious public schools for boys in New York City.

'}
116th Street (Q4547583)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

116th Street runs from Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River, to the East River, through the New York City borough of Manhattan. It traverses the neighborhoods of Morningside Heights, Harlem, and Spanish Harlem; the street is interrupted between Morningside Heights and Harlem by Morningside Park.\n

'}
151st Street (Q4550266)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

151st Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. The next stop to the north was 155th Street. The next stop to the south was 145th Street. The station opened on November 15, 1917 and closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
173 and 176 Perry Street (Q4552721)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

173 and 176 Perry Street are a pair of high-rise residential buildings facing West Street in West Village, Manhattan, New York City. It was designed by Richard Meier & Partners, and are the first project undertaken by Meier in Manhattan, although they stand a short walk away from his 1970 renovation of the Westbeth Artists Community. Construction of the buildings began in 1997 and was completed in 2002.\n

'}
1997 Empire State Building shooting (Q4592356)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On February 23, 1997, Ali Hassan Abu Kamal, a 69-year-old Palestinian teacher, opened fire on the observation deck of the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York City. The gunman killed one person and wounded six others before taking his own life with a gunshot to the head.

'}
2012 Empire State Building shooting (Q4625381)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On August 24, 2012, a gunman shot and killed a former co-worker outside the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York City. Following the initial shooting, the gunman, 58-year-old Jeffrey T. Johnson, was fatally shot by police officers after raising his weapon at them. Nine bystanders were wounded by stray bullets fired by the officers and ricocheting debris, but none suffered life-threatening injuries.

'}
23rd Street Fire (Q4631702)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 23rd Street Fire was an incident that took place in the Flatiron District neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, on October 17, 1966. A group of firefighters from the New York City Fire Department responding to a fire at 7 East 22nd Street entered a building at 6 East 23rd Street as part of an effort to fight the fire. Twelve firefighters were killed after the floor collapsed, the largest loss of life in the department's history until the collapse of the World Trade Center in the September 11 attacks of 2001.

"}
353 Central Park West (Q4635498)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

353 Central Park West is an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It is located at the corner of Central Park West and West 95th Street.\n

'}
360 Central Park West (Q4635636)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

360 Central Park West is a 16-story apartment high-rise on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It was designed by Rosario Candela. It is listed as a contributing property to the Central Park West Historic District.\n

'}
42nd Street (Q4637818)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

42nd Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two island platforms. The next stop to the north was 50th Street for local trains and 57th Street for express trains. The next stop to the south was 34th Street for local trains and 14th Street for express trains. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
130th Street (Q4549009)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

130th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 125th Street. The next northbound stop was 135th Street.\n

'}
2007 New York City steam explosion (Q4609003)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

On July 18, 2007, an explosion in Manhattan, New York City, sent a geyser of hot steam up from beneath a busy intersection, with a 40-story-high shower of mud and flying debris raining down on the crowded streets of Midtown Manhattan. It was caused by the failure of an 83-year-old, 24-inch (0.61\xa0m) underground steam pipe near Grand Central Terminal, which exploded during the evening rush hour.\n

'}
254-260 Canal Street (Q4632092)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

254-260 Canal Street, also known as the Bruce Building, on the corner of Lafayette Street in the Chinatown neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1856-57 and was designed in the Italian Renaissance revival style. The cast-iron elements of the facade may have been provided by James Bogardus, a pioneer in the use of cast iron in architecture. The building was constructed for George Bruce, a prosperous printer and inventor of new technologies in the printing industry, which was then one of New York's leading industries. It was converted to offices in 1987 by architect Jack L. Gordon.

"}
302 West 12th Street (Q4634365)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

302 West 12th Street is a residential building facing west onto Abingdon Square Park in the Greenwich Village Historic District[1] on the west side of lower Manhattan in New York City, United States.\n

'}
303 East 51st Street (Q4634379)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

303 East 51st Street is a skyscraper in the Turtle Bay neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. The residential building is 360\xa0ft (110\xa0m) with 32 floors.

'}
145th Street (Q4549790)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

145th Street is a major crosstown street in the Harlem neighborhood, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is one of the 15 crosstown streets mapped out in the Commissioner's Plan of 1811 that established the numbered street grid in Manhattan. It forms the northern border of the Sugar Hill neighborhood within Harlem.\n

"}
1938 NFL Championship Game (Q4564290)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1938 National Football League Championship Game was the sixth championship game played in the National Football League (NFL). It was played on December 11 at the Polo Grounds in New York City, with an attendance of 48,120, a record crowd for a title game.

'}
1972 Harlem Mosque incident (Q4575029)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1972 Harlem mosque shooting occurred on April 14, 1972, when a New York City Police Department (NYPD) officer was shot and fatally wounded at the Nation of Islam Mosque No. 7 in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The officer responded to a fake 9-1-1 call, but was shot and died from his wounds six days later. The incident sparked political and public outcry about mishandling of the incident by the NYPD and the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay.\n

'}
1998 Bank of America robbery (Q4593389)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1998 Bank of America robbery was a robbery of $1.6 million in cash at the Bank of America in 1 World Trade Center, in New York City, on January 14, 1998.\n

'}
2 Horatio Street (Q4633330)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

2-10 Horatio Street is a 17-story co-operative apartment building located between Greenwich and Eighth Avenues, on the corner of Greenwich Avenue, across from Jackson Square Park in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, United States. Built in 1929-31 and designed by Robert T. Lyons, the building is located within the Greenwich Village Historic District, but is not, of itself, a landmarked building. The building also has the address 123-129 Greenwich Avenue.

'}
369th Regiment Armory (Q4635701)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 369th Regiment Armory is a historic National Guard Armory building located at 2366 Fifth Avenue, between West 142nd and 143rd Streets, in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. It was built for the 369th Regiment, also known as the "Harlem Hell Fighters", founded in 1913 as the first National Guard unit in New York State composed solely of African-Americans. It later became home to the 369th Sustainment Brigade.\n

'}
42nd Street (Q4637816)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

42nd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It was opened on November 6, 1875, and had two levels. On the lower level, the local trains stopped, on two tracks serving two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track which carried express trains bypassing the station. The next northbound stop was 50th Street. The next southbound stop was 34th Street. The station was closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
42nd Street (Q4637821)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

42nd Street was an elevated express station on the IRT Third Avenue Line in New York City. It had two levels with the lower level (built first) having three tracks. The main line tracks were served by two side platforms. A side platform connected to the southbound platform was used for shuttle service to Grand Central. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts, and had one track and two side platforms over the two local tracks.\n

'}
47th Street (Q4638574)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

47th Street is an east–west running street between First Avenue and the West Side Highway in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Traffic runs one way along the street, from east to west, starting at the headquarters of the United Nations. The street features the Diamond District in a single block (where the street is also known as Diamond Jewelry Way) and also courses through Times Square.\n

'}
104th Street (Q4546552)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

104th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 99th Street. The next northbound stop was 110th Street. This had a view of the Suicide Curve at 110th Street.\n

'}
105th Street (Q4546616)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

105th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 111th Street. The next stop to the south was 99th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
106th Street (Q4546691)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

106th Street was an express station on the IRT Third Avenue Line in New York City. The station was opened on December 30, 1878, and had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level had one track and two side platforms over the local tracks on the lower level and served express trains. It was built as part of the Dual Contracts. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
106th Street (Q4546689)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

106th Street is a planned station along the IND Second Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It would be located at the intersection of Second Avenue and 106th Street in East Harlem, Manhattan. Proposed since 1968, the station is expected to be built by 2027–2029 as part of Phase 2 of the Second Avenue Subway. When opened, it will initially be served by the Q train, with the T train providing service when Phase 3 of the line is built.\n

'}
111th Street (Q4547352)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

111th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 117th Street. The next stop to the south was 105th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
129th Street (Q4548652)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

129th Street was a transfer station on the IRT Third Avenue Line in Manhattan, shared by trains of both the Third Avenue Line and IRT Second Avenue Line in the New York City Subway system. The next stop to the north was 133rd Street for the main line and Willis Avenue for the Willis Avenue spur, both of which were across a swing bridge above the Harlem River in the Bronx. The next stop to the south was 125th Street−Third Avenue for Third Avenue Line trains and 125th Street−Second Avenue for Second Avenue Line trains.

'}
140th Street (Q4549625)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

140th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 135th Street. The next northbound stop was 145th Street.\n

'}
161 West 93rd Street (Q4551243)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

161 West 93rd Street is a building on 93rd Street in Manhattan that was once the home of the Nippon Club, a gentlemen's club for Japanese Americans and Japanese nationals.

"}
1946 NFL Championship Game (Q4565759)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1946 National Football League Championship Game was the 14th annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL), played December 15 at the Polo Grounds in New York City, with a record-breaking attendance of 58,346.\n

'}
19th Street (Q4595818)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

19th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level had one track for express trains. The next stop to the north was 23rd Street. The next stop to the south was 14th Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
14th Street (Q4550092)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

14th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line, an elevated railway in New York City. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track and two side platforms over the lower level local tracks. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was Christopher Street for express and local trains. The next northbound local stop was 23rd Street. The next northbound express stop was 34th Street.\n

'}
14th Street (Q4550093)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

14th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line, located at the intersection of 14th Street and First Avenue. It had two levels. The lower level had three tracks and two side platforms and was served by local trains. The upper level had two tracks and two side platforms and was used by express trains. The next stop to the north was 19th Street for local trains and 42nd Street for express trains. The next stop to the south was Eighth Street for local trains and Chatham Square for express trains. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
18th Street (Q4557667)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

18th Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had two tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line and opened in 1892. It closed on December 4, 1938, and was not replaced with a subway station on the IND Sixth Avenue Line. However, one block north of the station there was a 19th Street station on the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad that operated between 1908 and 1954. The next southbound stop was 14th Street. The next northbound stop was 23rd Street.\n

'}
18th Street (Q4557668)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

18th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that bypassed the station and served express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
23rd Street (Q4631692)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

23rd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed the station. It opened on October 21, 1873 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 14th Street. The next northbound stop was 30th Street.\n

'}
23rd Street (Q4631696)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

23rd Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track with two side platforms and served express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
360 Tenth Avenue (Q4635644)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

360 Tenth Avenue is an unbuilt skyscraper in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It would have been 772\xa0ft (235\xa0m) tall and have 61 floors.\n

"}
47th Street (Q4638567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

47th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains by two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track for express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
116th Street (Q4547581)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

116th Street is a planned station along the IND Second Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It would be located at the intersection of Second Avenue and 116th Street in East Harlem, Manhattan. Proposed since 1968, the station is expected to be built by 2027–2029 as part of Phase 2 of the Second Avenue Subway. When opened, it will initially be served by the Q train, with the T train providing service when Phase 3 of the line is built.\n

'}
170-176 John Street Building (Q4552293)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

170-176 John Street is a commercial building erected in 1840 facing Burling Slip (now filled in) on John Street along the East River in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. It is one of possibly two surviving granite Greek Revival buildings in all of New York.

'}
178th-179th Street Tunnels (Q4553344)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 178th and 179th Street Tunnels are two defunct vehicular tunnels in Upper Manhattan in New York City. Originally conceived and constructed under the auspices of Robert Moses, the twin tunnels have been superseded by the Trans-Manhattan Expressway in Washington Heights, which itself runs through a cut with high-rise apartments built over it in places.\n

'}
117th Street (Q4547637)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

117th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 121st Street. The next stop to the south was 111th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
121st Street (Q4548208)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

121st Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 125th Street. The next stop to the south was 117th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
1973 New York City bomb plot (Q4575645)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1973 New York City bomb plot was a plan by the Palestinian militant group Black September to detonate three car bombs in New York City at the same time Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir arrived there in March 1973. The bombs failed to explode, but the main suspect, Khalid Duhham Al-Jawary, was not caught until January 1991. The attempted attack was the first such Black September operation within the United States.

'}
Audubon Avenue (Q2870884)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Audubon Avenue is an avenue in the Washington Heights neighborhood in Upper Manhattan that runs north-south, west of and parallel to Amsterdam Avenue. Its southern terminus is at West 165th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue, and its northern terminus is at Fort George Avenue, just north of West 193rd Street. It crosses over the Trans-Manhattan Expressway, east of the eastern portal of the expressway's tunnel.\n

"}
Computer Music Center (Q2984573)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Computer Music Center (CMC) at Columbia University is the oldest center for electronic and computer music research in the United States. It was founded in the 1950s as the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center.\n

'}
339 Grand Street House (Q30623304)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

339 Grand Street, also addressed as 57 Ludlow Street, located at the corner of Ludlow Street in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City was completed in c.1831-33 in the Federal style as one of five row houses constructed by John Jacob Astor on property he purchased in 1806. The early tenants of the building were several dry goods merchants. The rear addition on Ludlow Street was built c.1855. The front of the house has been a storefront since at least 1884.

'}
American Airlines Flight 11 (Q11694)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

American Airlines Flight 11 was a domestic passenger flight that was hijacked by five al-Qaeda members on September 11 in 2001, as part of the September 11 attacks. Mohamed Atta deliberately crashed the plane into the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing all 92 people aboard and an unknown number in the building's impact zone. The aircraft involved, a Boeing 767-223ER, registration N334AA, was flying American Airlines' daily scheduled morning transcontinental service from Logan International Airport in Boston to Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles.\n

"}
United Airlines Flight 175 (Q11705)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

United Airlines Flight 175 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Logan International Airport, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Los Angeles International Airport, in Los Angeles, California. On September 11, 2001, the Boeing 767-200 operating the route was hijacked by five al-Qaeda terrorists and was deliberately crashed into the South Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing all 65 people aboard and an unconfirmed number in the building's impact zone.\n

"}
1211 Avenue of the Americas (Q2943880)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

1211 Avenue of the Americas (also known as the News Corp. Building) is an International style skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Formerly called the Celanese Building, it was completed in 1973 as part of the Rockefeller Center extension, that started in the late 1950s with the Time-Life Building. The Celanese Corporation would later move to Dallas, Texas. Currently, 1211 is owned by Ivanhoé Cambridge. The structure has a simple slab-like shape devoid of any decoration, its prosaic façade consisting of vertical alternating limestone and glass stripes. The façade stone piers are supernumerary; there are twice as many of them as structurally necessary. The glass bands are continuous and offer no indication of floor levels. These features ably create the visual lack of scale, so the tower does not look overly bulky.

'}
Hudson Terminal (Q2918029)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hudson Terminal was a rapid transit station and office-tower complex in Manhattan, New York City. The terminal, which contained five tracks and three platforms, was located in the Lower Manhattan neighborhood of Radio Row and served the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad (H&M) . The two 22-story office skyscrapers above the terminal were among the world's largest when the H&M terminal opened in 1909.\n

"}
St. John's Chapel (Q2957049)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St. John's Chapel belonged to the Episcopal parish of Trinity Church in Tribeca, Manhattan, New York City.\n

"}
Morse Building (Q29094843)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Morse Building, also known as the Nassau–Beekman Building, is a high-rise building located in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. The Morse Building was one of the world's first prismatically shaped skyscrapers and, at 140 feet (43\xa0m), one of the tallest buildings in New York City when built. Its sheer walls and flat roof were a departure from designs of previous buildings topped by setbacks, mansard roofs, or towers. It was developed by G. Livingston and Sidney E. Morse, nephews of telegraph inventor Samuel F. B. Morse. The building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on September 19, 2006.

"}
520 West 28th Street (Q29469309)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

520 West 28th Street, also known as the Zaha Hadid Building, is located in New York City. Designed by the architect Zaha Hadid, the building was her only residential building in New York and one of her last projects before her death. The building is located along the High Line. The building is set to have four art galleries located at street level. The building also has a sculpture platform with art curated by Friends of the High Line.\n

'}
Podhajcer Shul (Q30624221)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Podhajcer Shul was a synagogue on 108 East First Street at Houston Street in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Although the building has been repurposed to residential use, its facade retains a prominent Star of David, as well as an stone arch inscribed "Beth HaKnesset Ansche Podhajce," which means "Synagogue of the People of Podhajce," and two capitals in the shape of Torah scrolls. \n

'}
The Tank (Q30598334)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Tank is a nonprofit off-off-Broadway performance venue and producer in Manhattan, New York. The organization was founded in May 2003 by a group of young artists and has since moved several times, residing on 36th Street as of 2017. The Tank presents art across several disciplines (comedy, dance, theater, music, film), produced at no fee for use of the venue to the presenting artists.\n

'}
Windows on the World (Q11706)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Windows on the World was a complex of venues on the top floors (106th and 107th) of the North Tower (Building One) of the original World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan. It included a restaurant called Windows on the World, a smaller restaurant called Wild Blue, a bar called The Greatest Bar on Earth, and rooms for private functions. Developed by restaurateur Joe Baum and designed initially by Warren Platner, Windows on the World occupied 50,000 square feet (4,600 m²) of space in the North Tower. The restaurants opened on April 19, 1976, and were destroyed in the September 11, 2001, attacks.

'}
DEBRA (Q2890235)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

DEBRA (formerly known as DebRA) is the name of an international medical research charity dedicated to the curing of epidermolysis bullosa, with national groups in over 40 countries (including the British and American) and growing.

'}
130 Cedar Street (Q29097887)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

130 Cedar Street, formerly known as the Green Exchange Building, is a mid-rise building in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It is located between Cedar Street and Albany Street running along Washington Street, sharing a block with 90 West Street. It was built in 1931 and was designed by Renwick, Aspinwall & Guard.

'}
32, 34 & 36 Dominick Street Houses (Q29469189)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 32, 34 & 36 Dominick Street Houses are three Federal style row houses on Dominick Street between Hudson and Varick Streets in the Hudson Square neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Waterline Square (Q29469318)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Waterline Square is a 5-acre (2.0\xa0ha), $2.3 billion luxury condominium and rental development located near the Hudson River on the Upper West Side of New York City. The complex will include three residential towers with 1,132 units and 3 acres (1.2\xa0ha) of park, along with 100,000 square feet (9,300\xa0m2) of amenity space. The residences range in size from one to five bedrooms.

'}
4th Ward, New York (Q30626035)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 4th Ward was one of the 22 wards of New York City with representation in the Board of Aldermen. It was made up of seven election districts and was bounded by Spruce, Ferry, Peck Slip, South, Catherine streets and Park Row.

'}
90-94 Maiden Lane Building (Q30623136)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

90–94 Maiden Lane is a cast-iron building on Gold Street between William and Pearl Streets in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1870-71 in the French Second Empire style and is attributed to Charles Wright. \n

'}
Amiable Child Monument (Q21497)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Amiable Child Monument is a monument located in New York City's Riverside Park. It stands west of the southbound lanes of Riverside Drive north of 122nd Street in Morningside Heights, Manhattan.

"}
Avenue B (Q2873530)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Avenue B is a north-south avenue located in the Alphabet City area of the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, east of Avenue A and west of Avenue C. It runs from Houston Street to 14th Street, where it continues into a loop road in Stuyvesant Town, to be connected with Avenue A. Below Houston Street, Avenue B continues as Clinton Street to South Street. It is the eastern border of Tompkins Square Park.\n

'}
Avenue D (Q2873601)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Avenue D is the easternmost named avenue in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, east of Avenue C and west of the FDR Drive. It runs through East 13th and Houston Streets, and continues south of Houston Street as Columbia Street until Delancey Street and Abraham E. Kazan Street until its end at Grand Street. Avenues A, B, C and D are the origin of the name of the section of the East Village neighborhood through which they run, Alphabet City.\n

'}
Gideon Tucker House (Q30623240)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Gideon Tucker House, also known as 2 White Street, is an historic house at the corner of West Broadway and White Street in the TriBeCa neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
Bennett Building (Q30602461)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bennett Building is a New York City designated landmark in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. The building is located along Nassau Street, for the entire block from Fulton Street to Ann Street. Having frontage on all three streets, it has three street addresses: 93-99 Nassau Street, 139 Fulton Street, and 30 Ann Street. Its key feature is a fully realized cast-iron facade, the largest known such example.

'}
Wall Street (Q11690)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street in the Financial District of New York City. It runs crosstown between Broadway on the west to South Street, at the East River, on the east. The term has become a metonym for the financial markets of the United States as a whole, the American financial services industry, or New York–based financial interests.

'}
Mark Twain School for the Gifted and Talented (Q29468830)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Mark Twain School for the Gifted and Talented is a magnet school in New York City located in Coney Island, Brooklyn. To acquire admission, applicants must apply to two of the schools talents; Science, Math, Creative Writing, Media, Drama, Dance, Winds, Vocal, Strings, Athletics, and Art, and pass the test provided by the school.

'}
Church Missions House (Q30081196)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Church Missions House (also known as 281 Park Avenue South) is a historic building and registered landmark in New York City on Park Avenue South on the corner of East 22nd Street, in an area once known as "Charity Row". The Church Missions House building was built between 1892 and 1894 for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Episcopal Church. The building was sold in 1963 to the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, which occupied the building until 2015.\n

'}
Bleecker Street Cinemas (Q2906365)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bleecker Street Cinema was an art house movie theater located at 144 Bleecker Street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. It became a landmark of Greenwich Village and an influential venue for filmmakers and cinemaphiles through its screenings of foreign and independent films. It closed in 1990, reopened as a gay adult theater for a time afterward, then again briefly showed art films until closing for good in 1991.\n

'}
Deitch Projects (Q3021342)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Deitch Projects (1996-2010) was a contemporary art gallery in New York City founded by Jeffrey Deitch. Deitch Projects had a gallery and project space at 76 Grand Street and 18 Wooster Street in SoHo, and previously an additional 12,000 square feet (1,100\xa0m2) in Long Island City.

'}
Delancey Street (Q3021466)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Delancey Street is one of the main thoroughfares of New York City's Lower East Side in Manhattan, running from the street's western terminus at the Bowery to its eastern end at FDR Drive, connecting to the Williamsburg Bridge and Brooklyn at Clinton Street. It is an eight-lane, median-divided street west of Clinton Street, and a service road for the Williamsburg Bridge east of Clinton Street. West of Bowery, Delancey Street becomes Kenmare Street, which continues as a four-lane, undivided street to Lafayette Street.\n

"}
Washington Apartments (Q30612082)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Washington Apartments are an apartment building in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Completed in 1884, it is notable for being the first apartment building in central Harlem. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the building a historic landmark on July 15, 1991.\n

'}
Natural Resource Governance Institute (Q30268314)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) is an independent nonprofit organisation dedicated to improving countries' governance over their natural resources (in particular oil, gas and minerals) to promote sustainable and inclusive development. The headquarters of NRGI are based in New York.\n

"}
520 West End Avenue (Q4640142)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

520 West End Avenue, also known as the John B. and Isabella Leech Residence, is a landmarked mansion on West End Avenue, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.\n

'}
53rd Street (Q4640405)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

53rd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track for express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
65th Street (Q4642146)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

65th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 72nd Street. The next stop to the south was 57th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
66th Street (Q4642229)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

66th Street is a crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan with portions on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side connected across Central Park via the 66th Street transverse. West 66th Street is notable for hosting the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts between Broadway and Columbus Avenue.\n

'}
67th Street (Q4642301)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

67th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track for express trains. 67th Street station opened on September 16, 1878 by the New York Elevated Railway Company, and was the terminus of the IRT Third Avenue Line until it was expanded to 89th Street on December 9, 1878. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
880 Fifth Avenue (Q4645031)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

880 Fifth Avenue is a luxury apartment building on Fifth Avenue at the northeast corner of 69th Street in New York City. The Art-Deco-styled building has 21 floors and features 162 residential units. 880 Fifth Avenue is also one of the few Fifth Avenue buildings to have a garage.

'}
930 Fifth Avenue (Q4645866)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

930 Fifth Avenue is a luxury apartment building on Fifth Avenue on the northeast corner of East 74th Street in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The eighteen-story structure and penthouse was designed by noted architect Emery Roth and built in 1940. According to architecture critic Paul Goldberger, 930 and 875 Fifth Avenue show Roth in transition from historicist to modern Art Deco style.

'}
A7 (Q4649617)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

A7 was a club in New York City. From 1981 to 1984, it was the unofficial headquarters of the New York hardcore scene. The tiny space was located on the southeast corner of East 7th Street and Avenue A in Manhattan\'s East Village. The Violators were one of the first punk bands to play there, performing once a month for over a year. Other bands that played on the Violators\' night included Minor Threat, Social Distortion, The Undead and False Prophets. Many of the NYC Oi! and hardcore bands would play on the bill, including hardcore icons Bad Brains, and gradually the A7 club turned into a hardcore scene. The club was staffed by members of the NYHC scene, including Doug Holland of Kraut, Raybeez of Agnostic Front and Warzone, and Jimmy Gestapo of Murphy\'s Law.\nThe club operated without a liquor license and was often raided by police. A warning spray-painted on the outside of the building read: "Out of town bands remember where you are".\n

'}
69th Infantry Regiment (Q4642413)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
Not to be confused with the New York National Guard unit: 69th Infantry Regiment (New York)

The 69th Infantry Regiment was twice a Regular Army (United States) infantry regiment that never saw combat.\n

'}
83 and 85 Sullivan Street (Q4644715)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

83 and 85 Sullivan Street are on Sullivan Street between Broome Street and Spring Street in Manhattan, New York. They are the two surviving Federal style rowhouses on this location, which was at one point part of the Bayard farm.

'}
85th Street (Q4644879)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

85th Street is a westbound-running street, running from East End Avenue to Riverside Drive in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.\n

'}
92nd Street (Q4645847)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

92nd Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 99th Street. The next stop to the south was 86th Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940. Four blocks to the north mass transit service was replaced by the 96th Street station of the Second Avenue Subway.\n

'}
A Faun Teased by Children (Q4656688)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bacchanal: A Faun Teased by Children is a marble sculpture by Italian artists Gian Lorenzo Bernini and his father Pietro Bernini. It was executed in 1616 and 1617, when Gian Lorenzo was not yet twenty years old. It is currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

'}
Aaron Academy (Q4661798)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Aaron School is a K-12 strengths based program for children facing developmental and learning challenges, located in New York City, United States, for students with average or above average cognitive ability. It provides a small, structured classroom setting with a multi-sensory and multi-disciplinary approach to learning. The students have challenges in the areas of language, auditory processing, attention, sensory integration, learning disabilities and executive functioning.\n

'}
Actors Fund of America (Q4677737)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Actors Fund of America is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that supports performers and behind-the-scenes workers in performing arts and entertainment, helping more than 17,000 people directly each year. Serving professionals in film, theatre, television, music, opera, radio and dance, the Fund’s programs include social services and emergency financial assistance, healthcare and insurance counseling, supportive and affordable housing, and employment and training services. The Fund owns and operates the Lillian Booth Actors Home, a skilled nursing and assisted living facility in Englewood, New Jersey.\n

'}
American Academy of the Fine Arts (Q4742912)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The American Academy of the Fine Arts was an art institution founded in 1802 in New York City, to encourage appreciation and teaching of the classical style. It exhibited copies of classical works and encouraged artists to emulate the classical in their work. The mayor of New York city at the time, Richard Varick, and Gulian Verplanck, a New York politician, were some of the Academy's original organizers. Younger artists grew increasingly restive under its constraint, and in 1825 left to found the National Academy of Design.\n

"}
53rd Street (Q4640404)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

53rd Street is a midtown cross street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, that runs adjacent to buildings such as the Citigroup building. It is 1.83 miles (2.94\xa0km) long. The street runs westbound from Sutton Place across most of the island's width, ending at DeWitt Clinton Park at Eleventh Avenue.\n

"}
80th Street (Q4644463)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

80th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 86th Street. The next stop to the south was 72nd Street. The station closed on June 11, 1940.\n

'}
99th Street (Q4646345)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

99th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on June 21, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 93rd Street. The next northbound stop was 104th Street.\n

'}
ANTA Washington Square Theatre (Q4653056)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The ANTA Washington Square Theatre was a theatre located on 40 West 4th St., in Greenwich Village, in New York City, and run by the American National Theater and Academy (ANTA). The theater was located away from the mainstream Broadway district, and was originally designed as a prototype for the Vivian Beaumont Theater. Demolished in 1968, it used a thrust stage tilted toward the audience, with the audience sitting on three sides of it. It did not employ the use of a curtain.\n

'}
48th Street Theatre (Q4638707)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 48th Street Theatre was a Broadway theatre at 157 West 48th Street in Manhattan. It was built by longtime Broadway producer William A. Brady and designed by architect William Albert Swasey. The venue was also called the Equity 48th Street Theatre (1922–25) and the Windsor Theatre (1937–43).\n

'}
4th Street (Q4639456)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

4th Street is a street in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It starts at Avenue D as East 4th Street and continues to Broadway, where it becomes West 4th Street. It continues west until the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where West 4th Street turns north and confusingly intersects with West 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th Streets in Greenwich Village. Most of the street has the same 40-foot (12\xa0m) width between curbstones as others in the prevailing street grid, striped as two curbside lanes and one traffic lane, with one-way traffic eastbound. The portion from Seventh to Eighth Avenues is westbound (northbound geographically) and is approximately 35 feet (11\xa0m) wide, a legacy of the original Greenwich Village street grid. The section of four short blocks from MacDougal Street to University Place which forms the southern border of Washington Square Park is called Washington Square South.

'}
54th Street (Q4640525)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

54th Street is a two-mile-long (3.2 km), one-way street traveling west to east across Midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
737 Park Avenue (Q4643268)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

737 Park Avenue is a prewar residential building on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, United States. Initially, the building had more than 100 apartments. The current capacity after renovation is 60 apartments.

'}
84th Street (Q4644817)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

84th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It was originally built on December 9, 1878. The station had two side platforms and was served by local trains only. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
89th Street (Q4645154)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

89th Street is a one-way street running westbound from the East River to Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street is interrupted by Central Park. It runs through the Upper West Side, Carnegie Hill and Yorkville neighborhoods.\n

'}
99th Street (Q4646347)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

99th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line in New York City. The station was originally built by the Manhattan Railway Company on December 30, 1878, and later had two levels. The lower level serving local trains was built first, and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level, built as part of the Dual Contracts had one track that bypassed the station and served express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street. South of the station were connecting tracks to the 98th Street Yard. The station was also located next to Substation 7 an old IRT substation designed not only in order to electrify the Third Avenue Line, but the Second and Ninth Avenue elevated lines as well. Later it even served as a power source for the IRT Lexington Avenue Line from 1918 until the 1970s. The substation is still owned by the MTA and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since February 9, 2006.

'}
AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition (Q4651887)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

AVAC is a New York City-based international non-profit community- and consumer-based organization working to accelerate ethical development and delivery of AIDS vaccines and other HIV prevention options to populations throughout the world. Founded in 1995, AVAC uses public education, policy analysis, advocacy and Community Mobilization to accelerate a comprehensive response to the epidemic.\n

'}
Adam and Sophie Gimbel Design Library (Q4680028)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Adam and Sophie Gimbel Design Library was the visual arts library of The New School University. Used primarily by students in the Parsons of Design division of The New School, it was located in the Sheila Johnson Design Center, in New York City's Greenwich Village.\n

"}
1 New York Place (Q4595997)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

1 New York Place was super tall skyscraper that was proposed in 2002 that would rise 1,050 feet (350 meters) tall and would have ninety floors. The Tower was supposed to be located in New York City’s Financial District; it would take up an entire block on Broadway where Fulton Street and John Street meet, but the project was canceled.

'}
299 West 12th Street (Q4632876)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

299 West 12th Street is a residential building facing south onto Abingdon Square Park in the Greenwich Village Historic District on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It was built by the developer brothers Bing & Bing and noted architect Emery Roth whose other works include The Beresford and The Eldorado.\n

'}
300 East 57th Street (Q4634310)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

300 East 57th Street is an apartment building on the corner of East 57th Street and Second Avenue in the Midtown neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Designed by Emery Roth and completed in November 1947, it was one of the first new luxury buildings built in Manhattan during the housing boom following the end of World War II. In 1948, only a few months after the building opened, theater producer Max Jelin was killed in a gas explosion in his apartment.

'}
34th Street (Q4635444)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

34th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line, New York, United States. It was originally built on July 30, 1873 by the New York Elevated Railroad Company, and had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track and two side platforms over the lower level local tracks. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was 30th Street. The next southbound express stop was 14th Street. The next northbound local stop was 42nd Street. The next northbound express stop was 66th Street. This station also serviced Penn Station and was west of the IRT and IND subway stations at Penn Station.\n

'}
58th Street Terminal (Q4640940)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

58th Street Terminal or 58th Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The center track was used for storage. The station was opened by the Gilbert Elevated Railway on June 5, 1878, and served as the northern terminus of the IRT Sixth Avenue Line trains until the line was acquired by the Manhattan Railway Company and built a connecting spur from 50th Street Station (the next southbound stop) along 53rd Street to the Ninth Avenue Elevated. It was replaced as the northernmost station on the line by the Eighth Avenue station in 1881, and closed on June 16, 1924.\n

'}
59E59 Theaters (Q4640970)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

59E59 Theaters is a curated rental venue located in New York City that consists of three theater spaces or stages. It shows both Off-Broadway (in Theater A) and Off-Off-Broadway plays (in Theaters B and C). The complex is owned and operated by the Elysabeth Kleinhans Theatrical Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation that is dedicated to hosting live stage performances from across the country and around the world. \n

'}
69th Infantry Regiment (Q4642412)
{'lang': , 'extract': '
In conjunction with the US Army units: for them see 69th Infantry Regiment (United States)

The 69th Infantry Regiment is an infantry regiment of the United States Army. It is from New York City, part of the New York Army National Guard. It is known as the "Fighting Sixty-Ninth", a name said to have been given by Robert E. Lee during the Civil War. An Irish heritage unit, as the citation from poet Joyce Kilmer illustrates, this unit is also nicknamed the "Fighting Irish", immortalized in Joyce Kilmer\'s poem When the 69th Comes Home. Between 1917 and 1992 it was also designated as the 165th Infantry Regiment. It is headquartered at the 69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan.\n

'}
75½ Bedford St (Q4643471)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

75½ Bedford Street is a house located in the West Village neighborhood of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. Built in 1873, it is often described as the narrowest house in New York. \nIts past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead. It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a plaque on the outside of the house. The house is located in the Greenwich Village Historic District, but is not an individually designated New York City Landmark.

'}
116th Street (Q4547582)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

116th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had three tracks on two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms for local trains, and was built first. The upper level, built as part of the Dual Contracts, had one track for express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
135th Street (Q4549186)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

135th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 130th Street. The next northbound stop was 140th Street.\n

'}
145th Street (Q4549791)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

145th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had 2 tracks and 2 side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had 1 track and 2 side platforms over the local tracks that served express trains. The station opened on December 1, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was 140th Street. The next southbound express stop was 125th Street. The next northbound local stop was 151st Street. The next northbound express stop was 155th Street.\n

'}
14th Street (Q4550095)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

14th Street was a local station on New York's demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that bypassed the station and served express trains. In 1924, the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation built the 14th Street-Eastern District Line Subway below the station, which included the Third Avenue subway station. Although this station was located above the Third Avenue BMT subway station on what is today known as the BMT Canarsie Line, the two stations were never connected. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

"}
23rd Street (Q4631695)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

23rd Street was a station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level had one track for express trains. The next stop to the north was 34th Street. The next stop to the south was 19th Street. The station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
28th Street (Q4632835)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

28th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. It was built first. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that bypassed the station and served express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
50th Street (Q4639967)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

50th Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had two tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line and opened on June 5, 1878. It closed on December 4, 1938. The next southbound stop was 42nd Street. For some trains, the next northbound stop was 58th Street Terminal until 1924, while for other trains, the next northbound stop was Eighth Avenue. For express trains, the next northbound stop was 66th Street on Ninth Avenue. Two years after the station closed, it was replaced two years later by the underground 47th–50th Streets–Rockefeller Center (IND Sixth Avenue Line) subway station.\n

'}
810 Fifth Avenue (Q4644471)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

810 Fifth Avenue is a luxury residential housing cooperative on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

'}
81st Street (Q4644567)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

81st Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 72nd Street. The next northbound stop was 86th Street.\n

'}
820 Fifth Avenue (Q4644577)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

820 Fifth Avenue is a luxury cooperative located at the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, United States.\n

'}
30th Street (Q4634647)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

30th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It was opened on December 13, 1873 as the replacement for the original northern terminus of the Ninth Avenue Line at 29th Street, which was built in 1868 The station which was originally built by the New York Elevated Railroad Company had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed the station. It closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 23rd Street. The next northbound stop was 34th Street.\n

'}
34th Street (Q4635445)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

34th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had two levels. The upper level had three tracks and two side platforms and was used for the Second Avenue line trains. The lower level, also known as Second Avenue, had two tracks and one island platform and was used by 34th Street shuttle trains. The next stop to the north was 42nd Street. The next stop to the south was 23rd Street. The next eastbound stop on the shuttle was 34th Street Ferry. The next westbound stop on the shuttle was Third Avenue. The shuttle platform closed on July 14, 1930, and the main line station closed on June 13, 1942.\n

'}
34th Street (Q4635447)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

34th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. The station was served by Third Avenue local trains and a shuttle to the 34th Street Ferry. Third Ave service originally had two tracks and two side platforms. During the Dual Contracts, a center express track was built. The shuttle to the ferry was served by two tracks and an island platform attached to the northbound side platform. North of the station the westbound track of the shuttle merged with the main line.\n

'}
38th Street (Q4636046)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

38th Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had two tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It opened in late 1913, as an infill station and closed on December 4, 1938. The next southbound stop was 33rd Street. The next northbound stop was 42nd Street. It was not replaced by a subway station, though a now-closed passage under Sixth Avenue running between the 42nd Street–Bryant Park and 34th Street–Herald Square stations had exits to 38th Street.

'}
42nd Street (Q4637819)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

42nd Street was a station on the demolished IRT Sixth Avenue Line. It had 2 tracks and two side platforms. It was served by trains from the IRT Sixth Avenue Line, and was located near sites such as the New York Public Library headquarters, Bryant Park, and the New York Hippodrome. The station opened on June 5, 1878, and closed on December 4, 1938. The next southbound stop was 38th Street. The next northbound stop was 50th Street. Two years later, the rapid transit needs of the intersection were replaced by the IND Sixth Avenue Line platforms of the 42nd Street–Bryant Park/Fifth Avenue subway station complex.\n

'}
44th Street Theatre (Q4638095)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 44th Street Theatre was a Broadway theatre located at 216 West 44th Street in New York City from 1912 to 1945. It opened and operated for three years as the Weber and Fields' Music Hall. Its rooftop theatre, the Nora Bayes Theatre, presented many productions of the Federal Theatre Project in the mid 1930s. Its basement club became the famed Stage Door Canteen during World War II.\n

"}
50th Street (Q4639969)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

50th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street runs eastbound from 12th Avenue, across the full width of the island, ending at Beekman Place and carries the M50 bus line, which returns on 49th Street. The following subway stations serve the street, west to east:\n

'}
51st Street (Q4640127)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

51st Street is a 1.9-mile (3.1\xa0km) long one-way street traveling east to west across Midtown Manhattan.\n

'}
66th Street (Q4642231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

66th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had two track and two side platforms over the lower level local tracks. The station closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was 59th Street. The next southbound express stop was 34th Street for Ninth Avenue trains, and 50th Street for IRT Sixth Avenue Line express trains. The next northbound local stop was 72nd Street. The next northbound express stop was 116th Street. The express run from this stop to 116th Street was the longest express segment out of all New York City elevated lines, bypassing seven local stations.\n

'}
76th Street (Q4643532)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

76th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line in New York City. It was originally built on December 9, 1878, and had two levels. The lower level was built first and served local trains. It had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track for express trains. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street.

'}
Surf Reality (Q7645876)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Surf Reality's House of Urban Savages, also known as Surf Reality, was a 65-seat performance venue on Manhattan's Lower East Side from 1993-2003. A laboratory for experimental performance of all kinds, Surf Reality was known for comedy, performance art, classic burlesque, modern music, vaudeville and experimental theater.\n

"}
St. Michael Academy (Q7590725)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St. Michael Academy was an all-girls, private, Roman Catholic high school in Manhattan in New York City. It is located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.\n

'}
Stella Adler Studio of Acting (Q7607037)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Stella Adler Studio of Acting (formerly Stella Adler Conservatory) is a prestigious acting school that was founded by actress and teacher Stella Adler. The Stella Adler Studio of Acting has two locations: its original New York City conservatory, founded in 1949, and the Art of Acting Studio in Los Angeles. The Stella Adler Studio of Acting in New York is not affiliated with the Stella Adler Academy & Theatre, which Adler established in Los Angeles in 1985. The Stella Adler Studio and the Juilliard School currently boast the lowest program acceptance rates in the professional acting world. The studio only accepts sixteen students a semester into its professional conservatory program.

'}
Stratosphere Sound (Q7622244)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Stratosphere Sound was a recording studio located in New York City. Previously known as "The Place", the studio was renamed Stratosphere Sound in 1999. Originally located in the Meatpacking District, the studio was relocated to Chelsea in 2001 after a fire damaged the original premises. The new location was designed by renowned studio architect Francis Manzella. The studio closed in 2012 due to economic changes in the music business, including decreased recording budgets and the rising cost of rent in Manhattan.

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Studio Building (Q7628166)
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The Studio Building is located on 131 East 66th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

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St. Teresa of Avila's Church (Q7591828)
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The Church of Notre dame of Avila is a former Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 187th Street at Broadway in Manhattan, New York City. The parish was established in 1932 in the former Church of St. Elizabeth and staffed by the Vincentian Fathers. The first pastor was Fr. Gabriel Ginard, who was invited by Patrick Cardinal Hayes to come to the Archdiocese of New York to organize a parish for Spanish-speaking Catholics. He first organized the Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal in 1926, followed by St. Theresa of Avila a few years later. The church, a historic landmark first built in 1872, was destroyed by a fire in 2019. Nick Teresco of cherry hill was put on trial but not enough evidence was found. The parish is now closed.\n

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Stanton Street (Q7600270)
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Stanton Street is a west-to-east street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, in the neighborhood of the Lower East Side. It begins at the Bowery at the corner of the infamous Sunshine Motel. This three-lane street, with a bike lane, a parking lane, and a through lane, is one block north of Rivington Street and one block south of Houston Street. Automotive traffic runs eastward to Pitt Street, after which it dead-ends into a pedestrian pathway.\n

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Stern College for Women (Q7611511)
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The Stern College for Women (SCW) is the undergraduate women's college of arts and sciences of Yeshiva University. It is located at the university's Israel Henry Beren Campus in the Murray Hill section of Manhattan.\n

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Stony Brook Manhattan (Q7619503)
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Stony Brook Manhattan was established in 2002 as a branch facility of Stony Brook University. It consolidated operations in 2011 to the 3rd floor of 387 Park Avenue South, with a classroom entrance around the corner at 101 East 27th Street. The 18,000-square-foot (1,700\xa0m2) site allowed Stony Brook to offer professional and graduate courses targeted towards students in the city; undergraduate courses were held primarily during the summer and winter sessions. Conferences and special events took place throughout the year. As of February 2017, the lease for the facility was terminated and classes are no longer offered.

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Stork Club (Q7620064)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Stork Club was a nightclub in Manhattan, New York City. During its existence from 1929 to 1965, it was one of the most prestigious clubs in the world. A symbol of café society, the wealthy elite, including movie stars, celebrities, showgirls, and aristocrats all mixed in the VIP Cub Room of the club. The club was established on West 58th Street in 1929 by Sherman Billingsley, a former bootlegger from Enid, Oklahoma. After an incident when Billingsley was kidnapped and held for ransom by Mad Dog Coll, a rival of his mobster partners, he became the sole owner of the Stork Club. The club remained at its original location until it was raided by Prohibition agents in 1931. After the raid, it moved to East 51st Street. From 1934 until its closure in 1965, it was located at 3 East 53rd Street, just east of Fifth Avenue, when it became world-renowned with its celebrity clientele and luxury. Billingsley was known for his lavish gifts, which brought a steady stream of celebrities to the club and also ensured that those interested in the famous would have a reason to visit.\n

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Great Fire of New York (Q2516056)
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The 1835 Great Fire of New York was one of three fires that rendered extensive damage to New York City in the 18th and 19th centuries. The fire occurred in the middle of an economic boom, covering 17 city blocks, killing two people, and destroying hundreds of buildings, with an estimated $20 million of property damage (equivalent to $528\xa0million in 2019).

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National Sculpture Society (Q2493507)
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Founded in 1893, the National Sculpture Society (NSS) was the first organization of professional sculptors formed in the United States. The purpose of the organization was to promote the welfare of American sculptors, although its founding members included several renowned architects. The founding members included such well known figures of the day as Daniel Chester French, Augustus St. Gaudens, Richard Morris Hunt, and Stanford White as well as sculptors less familiar today, such as Herbert Adams, Paul W. Bartlett, Karl Bitter, J. Massey Rhind, Attilio Piccirilli, and John Quincy Adams Ward—who served as the first president for the society.\n

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Washington Street (Q4105528)
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Washington Street is a north-south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It runs in several distinct pieces, from its northernmost end at 14th Street in the Meatpacking District to its southern end at Battery Place in Battery Park City. Washington Street is, for most of its length, the westernmost street in lower Manhattan other than West Street. The exceptions are a one-block segment in the West Village where Weehawken Street lies between West and Washington Streets, and in Battery Park City).\n

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Chrystie Street (Q4123570)
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Chrystie Street is a street on Manhattan's Lower East Side and Chinatown, running as a continuation of Second Avenue from Houston Street, for seven blocks south to Canal Street. It is bounded on the east for its entirety by Sara Delano Roosevelt Park, for the creation of which the formerly built-up east side of Chrystie Street (the even numbers) was razed, eliminating among other structures three small synagogues. Originally called First Street, it was renamed for Col. John Chrystie, a veteran of the War of 1812 and a member of the Philolexian Society of Columbia University, and a new First Street was laid out above Houston Street.\n

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Rare Book & Manuscript Library (Q4079856)
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The Rare Book & Manuscript Library is Columbia University's principal repository for special collections. Located in New York City on the university's Morningside Heights campus, its collections span more than 4,000 years, from early Mesopotamia to the present day, and span a variety of formats: cuneiform tablets, papyri, and ostraca, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, early printed books, works of art, posters, photographs, realia (such as mathematical instruments and theater models), sound and moving image recordings, and born-digital archives. Areas of collecting emphasis include American history, Russian and East European émigré history and culture, Columbia University history, comics and cartoons, philanthropy and social reform, the history of mathematics, human rights advocacy, Hebraica and Judaica, Latino arts and activism, literature and publishing, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, oral history, performing arts, and printing history and the book arts. \n

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Academy of Music (Q4306609)
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The Academy of Music was a New York City opera house, located on the northeast corner of East 14th Street and Irving Place in Manhattan. The 4,000-seat hall opened on October 2, 1854. The review in The New York Times declared it to be an acoustical "triumph", but "In every other aspect ... a decided failure," complaining about the architecture, interior design and the closeness of the seating; although a follow-up several days later relented a bit, saying that the theater "looked more cheerful, and in every way more effective" than it had on opening night.

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1040 Fifth Avenue (Q4546509)
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1040 Fifth Avenue (informally known as the 10 40) is a luxury residential housing cooperative in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.\n

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WWOR-TV (Q3044253)
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WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market. The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with New York-licensed Fox flagship WNYW (channel 5). The two stations share studios at the Fox Television Center on East 67th Street in Manhattan's Lenox Hill neighborhood; WWOR-TV's transmitter is located at One World Trade Center. Previously, WWOR maintained separate studios at 9 Broadcast Plaza on Meadowlands Parkway in Secaucus, while the WNYW facilities only housed WWOR's master control and some internal operations.\n

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Forbes Galleries (Q3076807)
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The Forbes Galleries, housed within the Forbes Building on Fifth Avenue between West 12th and 13th Streets in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, United States, was the home of Malcolm Forbes' collection, which the Forbes family continued to exhibit following his death.

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Lettie G. Howard (Q3061189)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lettie G. Howard, formerly Mystic C and Caviare, is a wooden Fredonia schooner built in 1893 in Essex, Massachusetts, USA. This type of craft was commonly used by American offshore fishermen, and is believed to be the last surviving example of its type. She was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1989. She is now based at the South Street Seaport Museum in New York City.\n

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WPIX (Q3068955)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

WPIX, virtual and VHF digital channel 11, is a CW-affiliated television station licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by the E. W. Scripps Company. Since its inception in 1948, WPIX\'s studios and offices have been located in the Daily News Building on East 42nd Street (also known as "11 WPIX Plaza") in Midtown Manhattan. The station\'s transmitter is located at the Empire State Building.\n

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Fight of the Century (Q3087660)
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Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier, billed as the Fight of the Century (also known as The Fight), was the boxing match between WBC/WBA heavyweight champion Joe Frazier (26–0, 23 KOs) and The Ring/lineal heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali (31–0, 25 KOs), held on Monday, March 8, 1971, at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

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WCBS-TV (Q3043497)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

WCBS-TV, virtual channel 2 (UHF digital channel 36), is the flagship station of the CBS television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States. The station is owned by the CBS Television Stations subsidiary of ViacomCBS, as part of a duopoly with Riverhead, New York-licensed independent station WLNY-TV (channel 55). The two stations share studios within the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan; WCBS-TV's transmitter is located at One World Trade Center. \n

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Harlem Alhambra (Q49263)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Harlem Alhambra was a theater in Harlem, New York, built in 1905, that began as a vaudeville venue. The building still stands. The architect was John Bailey McElfatrick (1829–1906) who, based in Manhattan, founded the architectural firm John B. McElfatrick & Son – builder of 100 theaters. Construction on the structure commenced late 1902 by its original owner, Harlem Auditorium Amusement Company.\n

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Fillmore East (Q3072023)
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Fillmore East was rock promoter Bill Graham's rock venue on Second Avenue near East 6th Street in the (at the time) Lower East Side neighborhood, now called the East Village neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan of New York City. It was open from March 8, 1968, to June 27, 1971, and featured some of the biggest acts in rock music at the time. The Fillmore East was a companion to Graham's Fillmore Auditorium, and its successor, the Fillmore West, in San Francisco, Graham's home base.\n

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10 Rockefeller Plaza (Q3046556)
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10 Rockefeller Plaza (formerly the Eastern Air Lines Building and Holland House) is a 16-story building located on Rockefeller Plaza between 48th and 49th Streets in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Completed in 1940, the building is part of Rockefeller Center, and was built in the Art Deco style.\n

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89th Street (Q4645155)
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89th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. It was originally built on December 9, 1878, and had two levels. The lower level, built first, was served by local trains and had two tracks and two side platforms. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts, had one track that bypassed the station and served express trains. 89th Street station was the terminus of the IRT Third Avenue Line until it was expanded to 129th Street on December 30, 1878. This station closed on May 12, 1955, with the ending of all service on the Third Avenue El south of 149th Street. North of the station were connecting tracks to the 98th Street Yard.

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92nd Street Y (Q4645852)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a cultural and community center located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, USA, at the corner of East 92nd Street and Lexington Avenue. Its full name is 92nd Street Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association (YM-YWHA). It is not part of the YMCA.\n

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95th Street (Q4646040)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

95th Street runs from Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River, to the East River, through the New York City borough of Manhattan. It traverses the neighborhoods of Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Carnegie Hill, and Yorkville; the street is interrupted by Central Park. \n

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970 Park Avenue (Q4646141)
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970 Park Avenue is a luxury residential housing cooperative in Manhattan, New York City.\n

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99th Street (Q4646346)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

99th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Second Avenue Line. It had three tracks and two side platforms. The next stop to the north was 105th Street. The next stop to the south was 92nd Street. The station closed on June 12, 1940. Three blocks to the south mass transit service was replaced by the 96th Street station of the Second Avenue Subway.\n

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ARChive of Contemporary Music (Q4653639)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The ARChive of Contemporary Music (ARC) is a non-profit music library and archive based in New York City. It contains over five million items.\n

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Abraham Joshua Heschel School (Q4668947)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Abraham Joshua Heschel School (AJHS) is a pluralistic Nursery to 12 Jewish day school in New York City named in memory of one of the great Jewish leaders, teachers, and activists of the 20th century and dedicated to the values that characterized Rabbi Heschel’s life: intellectual exploration, integrity, love of the Jewish people and tradition, and a commitment to social justice. The Heschel School is a pluralistic, egalitarian community that includes families from a wide range of Jewish backgrounds, practices and beliefs.\n

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8BC (Q4645169)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

8BC was a nightclub, performance space, and art gallery located at 337 East 8th Street in the East Village neighborhood of New York, New York. Founded in 1983, the space closed in late 1985.

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907 Fifth Avenue (Q4645614)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

907 Fifth Avenue is a luxury residential housing cooperative in Manhattan, New York City, United States.\n

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927 Fifth Avenue (Q4645806)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

927 Fifth Avenue is an upscale residential apartment building in Manhattan, New York City, United States. It is located on Fifth Avenue at the corner of East 74th Street opposite the Conservatory Water in Central Park. The limestone-clad building was designed by Warren & Wetmore, also known for the Grand Central Terminal, and completed in 1917 in the Renaissance Revival style.\n

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93rd Street (Q4645924)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

93rd Street runs from Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River, to the East River, through the New York City borough of Manhattan. It traverses the neighborhoods of the Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Carnegie Hill, and Yorkville; the street is interrupted by Central Park. \n

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Actors Movement Studio (Q4677738)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Actors Movement Studio, also known as the Actor Movement Conservatory, is a teaching facility for actors in the Hells Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City.\n

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Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University (Q4677742)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University is a three-year graduate program in the theater arts. It has been located at Pace University in New York since 2006 and grants Master of Fine Arts degrees in acting, directing, and playwriting. James Lipton served as Dean Emeritus. The program is sanctioned by the Actors Studio, though graduation from the school does not guarantee membership in the Actors Studio.\n

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African Grove (Q4689776)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The African Grove Theatre was a theatre founded and operated by William Alexander Brown, a free black in New York City in 1821, who was from the West Indies.

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Earl Carroll Theatre (Q5325782)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Earl Carroll Theatre, built by Broadway impresario and showman Earl Carroll, was located in the Broadway Theater District in New York City at 753 Seventh Avenue & West 50th Street. Designed by architect George Keister, it opened on February 25, 1922, and was highly successful for a number of years until it was demolished and rebuilt on a lavish scale. It reopened in August 1931 with Carroll\'s billing that it was "the largest legitimate theater in the world." However, the facility\'s operating costs proved astronomical and it went into foreclosure in early 1932 after which it was acquired by producer Florenz Ziegfeld who renamed it the Casino Theatre. The Casino was the site of a very successful revival of Ziegfeld\'s production of Show Boat in 1932. However, Ziegfeld too went bankrupt only a short time later. The property was auctioned in foreclosure on 18 August 1933 to the Mutual Life Insurance Company for $1 million.

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Metrograph (Q45108410)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metrograph is an independent 2-screen movie theater at 7 Ludlow Street in Lower East Side, Manhattan. It opened in 2016 with two theatres, a bookstore, a "curated" concession stand, and a restaurant. It was founded by Alexander Olch, who is better known as a designer of men\'s ties.

'}