Harlem

Harlem, Manhattan, Manhattan Community Board 10, New York County, New York City, New York, USA
category: boundary — type: administrative — OSM: relation 8398081

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109 items

Harlem Alhambra (Q49263)

The Harlem Alhambra was a theater in Harlem, New York, built in 1905, that began as a vaudeville venue. The building still stands. The architect was John Bailey McElfatrick (1829–1906) who, based in Manhattan, founded the architectural firm John B. McElfatrick & Son – builder of 100 theaters. Construction on the structure commenced late 1902 by its original owner, Harlem Auditorium Amusement Company.

Cotton Club (Q1136776)

The Cotton Club was a New York City nightclub located in Harlem on 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue from 1923 to 1935, then briefly in the midtown Theater District from 1936 to 1940. The club operated most notably during the United States' era of Prohibition. The club was a whites-only establishment, but featured many of the most popular black entertainers of the era, including musicians Fletcher Henderson, Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Chick Webb, Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Fats Waller, Willie Bryant; vocalists Adelaide Hall, Ethel Waters, Cab Calloway, Bessie Smith, Aida Ward, Avon Long, the Dandridge Sisters, the Will Vodery Choir, The Mills Brothers, Nina Mae McKinney, Billie Holiday, Lena Horne; and dancers Bill Robinson, The Nicholas Brothers, Charles 'Honi' Coles, Leonard Reed, Stepin Fetchit, the Berry Brothers, The Four Step Brothers, Jeni Le Gon and Earl Snakehips Tucker.

Savoy Ballroom (Q1759057)

The Savoy Ballroom was a large ballroom for music and public dancing located at 596 Lenox Avenue, between 140th and 141st Streets in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Lenox Avenue was the main thoroughfare through upper Harlem. Poet Langston Hughes calls it the Heartbeat of Harlem in Juke Box Love Song, and he set his work "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" on the legendary street. The Savoy was one of many Harlem hot spots along Lenox, but it was the one to be called the "World's Finest Ballroom". It was in operation from March 12, 1926, to July 10, 1958, and as Barbara Englebrecht writes in her article "Swinging at the Savoy", it was "a building, a geographic place, a ballroom, and the 'soul' of a neighborhood". It was opened and owned by white entrepreneur Jay Faggen and Jewish businessman Moe Gale. It was managed by African-American business man and civic leader Charles Buchanan. Buchanan, who was born in the British West Indies, sought to run a "luxury ballroom to accommodate the many thousands who wished to dance in an atmosphere of tasteful refinement, rather than in the small stuffy halls and the foul smelling, smoke laden cellar nightclubs ..."

Rucker Park (Q2004591)

Rucker Park is a basketball court in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, at 155th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard across the street from the former Polo Grounds site; it is geographically at the base of a large cliff named Coogan's Bluff. Many who played at the park in the Rucker Tournament achieved a level of fame for their abilities, and several have gone on to play in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Jordan L. Mott House (Q6276682)

The Jordan L. Mott House was a mansion located on 2122 Fifth Avenue, near 130th Street in the Upper East Side of New York City.

Knowledge and Power Preparatory Academy IV (Q6423347)
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
Lincoln Correctional Facility (Q6550575)

Lincoln Correctional Facility is a minimum-security men's prison located at 31–33 West 110th Street in Manhattan, facing the north side of Central Park. Since 1991 it has been used primarily as a work-release center for drug offenders; however, around 5% of the roughly 275 inmates it houses are white collar criminals.

Mount Calvary United Methodist Church (Q6919965)

Mount Calvary United Methodist Church is a Methodist church in Harlem Village, Manhattan, New York City at 116 Edgecombe Avenue. The congregation occupies the former Lutheran church building of The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Atonement, which was established in 1896 and built in 1897 as a mission church of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. When Atonement merged with the Lutheran Church of Our Saviour, Atonement's congregation moved into Our Saviour's building at 525 West 179th Street and then 580 West 187th Street.

Lafayette Theater (Q6471542)

The Lafayette Theatre was an entertainment venue located at 132nd Street and 7th Avenue in Harlem, New York that operated from 1912 to 1951. The structure was demolished in 2013.

National Dance Institute (Q6972111)

National Dance Institute (NDI) was founded in 1976 by New York City Ballet principal dancer Jacques d'Amboise.

Connie's Inn (Q5161816)

Connie's Inn was a Harlem, New York City nightclub established in 1923 by Connie Immerman (né Conrad Immerman; 1893–1967) in partnership with two of his brothers, George (1884–1944) and Louie Immerman (1882–1955). Having immigrated from Latvia, the Immerman brothers operated a Harlem delicatessen and made their fortune as bootleggers. Their club was located at 2221 Seventh Avenue at 131st Street from 1923 until 1934. Acts featured there included Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller, Wilbur Sweatman, Peg Leg Bates, Bricktop and Fletcher Henderson. Unlike the Cotton Club, Connie's Inn featured African-American performers but did not restrict its audience to whites only. Members of the Ziegfeld Follies, heiress Gertrude Vanderbilt, and numerous others poured in from downtown to enjoy the shows at Connie's Inn and were sometimes influential in moving their revues to Broadway.

Hoofers Club (Q5897693)

The Hoofers Club was an African-American entertainment establishment and dancers' club hangout in Harlem, New York, in the early- to mid-twentieth century. The club was a legendary site of some of the best of jazz and tap performers, particularly in the 1920s and 1930s. It was located on Harlem's "Swing Street," the stretch of 133rd Street between Lenox and Seventh Avenues known for its music and dance venues.

Malcolm X Boulevard (Q6523155)

Lenox Avenue – also named Malcolm X Boulevard; both names are officially recognized – is the primary north–south route through Harlem in the upper portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan. This two-way street runs from Farmers' Gate at Central Park North (110th Street) to 147th Street. Its traffic is figuratively described as "Harlem's heartbeat" by Langston Hughes in his poem Juke Box Love Song. The IRT Lenox Avenue Line runs under the entire length of the street, serving the New York City Subway's 2 and ​3 trains.

Matthew Henson Residence (Q6790666)

The Matthew Henson Residence is a historic apartment residence at 246 West 150th Street in Manhattan, New York City. Apartment 3F in this building is where Matthew Henson (1866-1955), the African American polar explorer, lived from 1929 until his death. Henson was arguably the first man to reach the Geographic North Pole, a feat that is disputed in part by his own diary. His residence was named a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

Florence Mills House (Q5460720)

Florence Mills House at 220 West 135th Street was believed to be where Florence Mills, 1896–1927, lived from 1910 to 1927. She was a leading African-American actress and entertainer during the 1920s. She lived at this address, or a similar address a few blocks away, during her most productive years. The 220 West 135th Street building that existed in 1927 no longer stands and has been replaced. The site was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. The designation was withdrawn in 2009.

Manhattan Avenue-West 120th-123rd Streets Historic District (Q6749230)

Manhattan Avenue–West 120th–123rd Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem in New York City. It consists of 113 contributing residential rowhouses built between 1886 and 1896. The buildings are three story brownstone and brick rowhouses over raised basements in the Queen Anne, Romanesque, and Neo-Grec styles.

Chapel of the Resurrection (Q5073120)

The Chapel of the Resurrection is a Roman Catholic chapel in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 276 West 151st Street, Manhattan, New York City.

Atlah Worldwide Church (Q4815950)

ATLAH World Missionary Church (formerly Bethelite Missionary Baptist Church) is a Christian church and ministry located in Harlem, New York. James David Manning is the chief pastor. The church campus is the site of the unaccredited ATLAH Theological Seminary, where classes are offered on preaching and prophecy. The church also has a studio that Manning uses for his Internet radio program The Manning Report. The church's YouTube channel has over 72,000 subscribers as of March 2018.

Bethany Baptist Church (Q4897717)


Bethany Baptist Church is a Baptist church located at 542-546 West 153rd Street in Manhattan, New York City. The church building was originally built for as the Washington Heights Evangelical Lutheran Church, built 1921 to designs by architect Francik Averkamp of 600 West 181st Street. A minor brick and stone fence was built in 1911 to designs by Upjohn & Conable, indicating an earlier building.

Clef Club (Q5131072)

The Clef Club was a popular entertainment venue and society for African-American musicians in Harlem, achieving its largest success in the 1910s. Incorporated by James Reese Europe in 1910, it was a combination musicians' hangout, fraternity club, labor exchange, and concert hall, across the street from Marshall's Hotel. In its best years, the Clef Club's annual take exceeded $100,000.

Harlem Opera House (Q23091760)

Harlem Opera House was a US opera house located at 211 West 125th Street, in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. Designed by architect John B. McElfatrick, it was built in 1889 by Oscar Hammerstein; it was his first theater in the city.

Braddock Hotel (Q16255373)

Braddock Hotel was a hotel at the corner of 126th Street and 8th Avenue in New York City, near the Apollo Theater. The hotel bar was popular with black jazz musicians, and Dizzy Gillespie, Billy Eckstine, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Dinah Washington performed here. Before he joined the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X (then known as Malcolm Little) often spent time at the hotel's bar.

Greater Hood Memorial AME Zion Church (Q19876268)

The Greater Hood Memorial AME Zion Church was the first African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, in Harlem, New York. It received notoriety as the "Oldest Continuing" Black church in Harlem. The church’s first house of worship was erected on East 117th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues in 1843.

Washington Apartments (Q30612082)

The Washington Apartments are an apartment building in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Completed in 1884, the building is notable for being the first apartment building in central Harlem. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the building a historic landmark on July 15, 1991.

Wadleigh High School for Girls (Q7959300)

The Wadleigh High School for Girls, which was established by the NYC Board of Education in 1897, and which moved into its new building in September 1902, was the first public high school for girls in New York City. At the time, public secondary education for girls was considered highly novel and perhaps a bit scandalous. Newspapers considered it newsworthy enough to devote many stories to describing classroom scenes of girls receiving “higher” education.

Harlem Academy (Q14706313)

Harlem Academy is a co-educational, private, independent, and nonprofit day school registered with the New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS). Harlem Academy guides promising, low-income students to thrive at the highest academic levels and one day make a mark on the world. The school aims to foster levels of academic achievement and character development required to enter and thrive at top secondary schools. Located at 1330 Fifth Avenue in Harlem, it serves grades one through eight. It emphasizes academic rigor and family partnership. Admission is need-blind and tuition is determined on a sliding scale in order to make the school accessible to families of all income levels. The school is primarily funded through private donations, which allow students from under-served communities to access a strong education. The head of the school is Vincent "Vinny" Dotoli.

PS 185 John M. Langston (Q7120785)
  • From a school: This is a redirect from a school article that may have had very little information or did not meet notability criteria. The information from this article may have been merged into an appropriate location, school district page, or school list.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church (Q7586863)

St. Andrew's Episcopal Church is an historic Episcopal church located at 2067 5th Avenue at 127th Street in the neighborhood of Harlem in Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1872, it was designed by noted New York City architect Henry M. Congdon (1834–1922) in the Gothic Revival style. It features a 125 foot tall clock tower surmounted by a slate covered spire surrounded by four towerlets.

St. Mark the Evangelist's Church (Q7589991)

The Church of St. Mark the Evangelist is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at West 138th Street, near Lenox Avenue in northern Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The address is 59-61 West 138th Street and 195 East Lenox Avenue. The parish was established in 1907 and has been staffed by the Holy Ghost Fathers since 1912. The Rev. Charles J. Plunkett, pastor, had a brick church built in 1914 to designs by Nicholas Serracino of 1170 Broadway for $12,000.

Substation 219 (Q7632100)

Substation 219, also known as Harlem Substation, is a historic electrical substation located in Harlem, New York, New York. It was constructed by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company in 1932 to provide power to the IND Eighth Avenue Line. It is a single-story, double-height masonry building in the Art Deco style. It features a low brick parapet topped by a band of limestone coping and a limestone frieze consisting of diamond-shaped limestone pieces and a brick chevron pattern. The main entrance doors are faced in aluminium and incorporate Art Deco-style geometric motifs.

West End Theatre (Q7985107)

Two theatres in Harlem, New York City, have been named West End Theatre. The first, of 1899, was abandoned after the foundation was built. It was on the northeast corner of 124th Street and Seventh Avenue, which is today known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

Opportunity Charter School (Q7098587)

Opportunity Charter School is an American charter school in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York. It serves approximately 400 students in grades 6–12. It was chartered by the New York State Board of Regents in 2004. The charter school serves disabled and academically struggling students. A fight to renew its charter was won in 2011 with a two-year renewal granted and the school's website reported a five-year renewal in 2012.

St. Nicholas Historic District (Q7590831)

The St. Nicholas Historic District, known colloquially as "Striver's Row", is a historic district located on both sides of West 138th and West 139th Streets between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (Seventh Avenue) and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (Eighth Avenue) in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is both a national and a New York City district, and consists of row houses and associated buildings designed by architects and built in 1891–93 by developer David H. King, Jr. These are collectively recognized as gems of New York City architecture, and "an outstanding example of late 19th-century urban design":

New York Amsterdam News Building (Q7013013)

The New York Amsterdam News Building is a historic rowhouse at 2293 Seventh Avenue in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is historically significant as the publishing home of the New York Amsterdam News between 1916 and 1938. During this period, the newspaper became one of the nation's most influential publications covering African-American issues. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. The Amsterdam News now publishes out of a building at 2340 Frederick Douglass Boulevard.

Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Church (Q7111022)

The Church of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal was a Roman Catholic parish, a part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (Q7829354)

The Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) is a private, non-profit, American osteopathic medical school with a main campus in the neighborhood of Central Harlem in New York City, New York and an additional campus located in Middletown, New York, 60 miles from New York City in the Hudson Valley. TouroCOM is a division of Touro College and University System.

Le Petit Senegal (Q14706778)

Le Petit Sénégal, or Little Senegal, is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It has been called Le Petit Senegal by the West African immigrant community and Little Senegal by some people from outside the neighborhood.

Victoria Theater (Q7927082)

Victoria Theater is a theater located on 125th Street in the Harlem neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It was designed in 1917 by Thomas W. Lamb, a notable and prolific theater architect of the era, for the Loew’s Corporation.

West 147th-149th Streets Historic District (Q7984212)

West 147th–149th Streets Historic District is a national historic district in Harlem, New York, New York. It consists of 60 contributing buildings; 58 tenements, one school, and one stable built between 1894 and 1905. With the exception of the stable, all of the buildings are five or six stories tall, all with brick facades. Most have some form of terra cotta ornament and all have pressed metal cornices. The earlier buildings reflect the Romanesque Revival style, with ornamental inspiration drawn from Renaissance and French Beaux-Arts styles.

151st Street (Q4550266)

151st Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. The next stop to the north was 155th Street. The next stop to the south was 145th Street. The station opened on November 15, 1917 and closed on June 11, 1940.

1946 NFL Championship Game (Q4565759)

The 1946 National Football League Championship Game was the 14th annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL), played December 15 at the Polo Grounds in New York City, with a record-breaking attendance of 58,346.

145th Street (Q4549791)

145th Street was an express station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had 2 tracks and 2 side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had 1 track and 2 side platforms over the local tracks that served express trains. The station opened on December 1, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound local stop was 140th Street. The next southbound express stop was 125th Street. The next northbound local stop was 151st Street. The next northbound express stop was 155th Street.

1972 Harlem Mosque incident (Q4575029)

The 1972 Harlem mosque incident occurred on April 14, 1972, when a New York City Police Department (NYPD) officer was shot and fatally wounded at the Nation of Islam Mosque No. 7 in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The officer responded to a fake 9-1-1 call, but was shot and died from his wounds six days later. The incident sparked political and public outcry about mishandling of the incident by the NYPD and the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay.

130th Street (Q4549009)

130th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 125th Street. The next northbound stop was 135th Street.

135th Street (Q4549186)

135th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had two levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 130th Street. The next northbound stop was 140th Street.

140th Street (Q4549625)

140th Street was a local station on the demolished IRT Ninth Avenue Line. It had 2 levels. The lower level was built first and had two tracks and two side platforms and served local trains. The upper level was built as part of the Dual Contracts and had one track that served express trains that bypassed this station. It opened on September 17, 1879 and closed on June 11, 1940. The next southbound stop was 135th Street. The next northbound stop was 145th Street.