London Ultra Low Emission Zone

London Ultra Low Emission Zone, Westminster, City of London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
category: boundary — type: low emission zone — OSM: relation 9418858

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110 items

St Audoen within Newgate (Q7592526)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Audoen within Newgate (also known as St Ewan within Newgate and St Ewin within Newgate) was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated on the corner of Newgate Street and Eldeness Lane (now Warwick Lane). It was first mentioned as Parochia sancti Audoeni in around 1220.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
Finsbury Chapel (Q1404975)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Finsbury Chapel, originally known as Fletcher's Chapel, was a Congregational chapel on the south side of East Street, Finsbury, London. It was founded by the Church of Scotland minister Alexander Fletcher in 1825.

St Sepulchre-without-Newgate (Q3495354)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Sepulchre-without-Newgate, also known as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (Holborn), is an Anglican church in the City of London. It is located on Holborn Viaduct, almost opposite the Old Bailey. In medieval times it stood just outside ("without") the now-demolished old city wall, near the Newgate. It has been a living of St John's College, Oxford, since 1622 and is part of the area designated the "Newgate Street Conservation Area" (No. 6) by the City of London Corporation.

website: http://www.stsepulchres.org; National Heritage List for England number: 1064640

St John Clerkenwell (Q3495329)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St John Clerkenwell is a former parish church in Clerkenwell, London, its original priory church site retains a crypt and has been given over to the London chapel of the modern Order of St John. It is a square, light-brick resurrection of the small church of Clerkenwell Priory – the crypt of which is beneath – without a spire or tower. Its three centuries of former decline reflected the disbandment of the medieval Order of St John, or Knights Hospitaller.

National Heritage List for England number: 1208840

Hospital of St Thomas of Acre (Q5908772)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Hospital of St Thomas of Acre was the medieval London headquarters of the Knights of Saint Thomas. It was founded as a church in 1227 in the parish of St Mary Colechurch, birthplace of the order's patron saint, Saint Thomas Becket. In the 14th century and after it was the main headquarters of the military order.

Holy Trinity, Minories (Q5886344)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Holy Trinity, Minories, was a Church of England parish church outside the eastern boundaries of the City of London, but within the Liberties of the Tower of London. The liberty was incorporated in the Metropolitan Borough of Stepney in 1899, and today is within the City of London. Converted from the chapel of a nunnery, Holy Trinity was in use as a church from the 16th century until the end of the 19th century. It survived as a parish hall until it was destroyed by bombing during World War II.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former Royal Peculiars, Former buildings and structures in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, Former churches in London
ChristChurch London (Q5108648)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

ChristChurch London (also commonly known as ChristChurch; and shorthand CCL), founded 2004, is a Christian church that meets at several locations across London, United Kingdom.

website: http://christchurchlondon.org

Albion Chapel (Q1705024)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Albion Chapel was a Scottish Presbyterian chapel in the City of London, near Finsbury Circus, on the corner of London Wall and Finsbury Pavement. It was established by Reverend Alexander Fletcher on the site of the old Bethlem Royal Hospital in 1815 and demolished in 1879. It was designed by the noted architect William Jay (1792/3-1837), who later became a leading architect in the United States.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1879
St Nicholas Shambles (Q7594963)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Nicholas Shambles was a medieval church in the City of London, which stood on the corner of Butcher Hall Lane (now King Edward Street) and Newgate Street. It took its name from the Shambles, the butchers area in the west of Newgate Street. The church is first mentioned as St. Nicholas de Westrnacekaria. In 1253 Walter de Cantilupe, Bishop of Worcester granted indulgences to its parishioners.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Pancras, Soper Lane (Q7595031)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Pancras, Soper Lane, was a parish church in the City of London, in England. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

National Heritage List for England number: 1001975

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Michael Queenhithe (Q7594835)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Michael Queenhithe was a church in the City of London located in what is now Upper Thames Street. First recorded in the 12th century, the church was destroyed during the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren, it was demolished in 1876.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1876, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Michael Bassishaw (Q7594829)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Michael Bassishaw a.k.a. Michael Basinshaw, was a parish church in Basinghall Street in the City of London, on land now occupied by the Barbican Centre complex. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1900.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1900, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Stephen Coleman Street (Q7595488)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Stephen's Church, Coleman Street, also called "St Stephen's in the Jewry", was a church in the City of London, at the corner of Coleman Street and what is now Gresham Street (and in Coleman Street Ward), first mentioned in the 12th century. In the middle ages it is variously described as a parish church, and as a chapel of ease to the church of St Olave Old Jewry; its parochial status was defined (or re-established) permanently in 1456.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Swithin, London Stone (Q7595498)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Swithin, London Stone, was an Anglican Church in the City of London. It stood on the north side of Cannon Street, between Salters' Hall Court and St Swithin's Lane, which runs north from Cannon Street to King William Street and takes its name from the church. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed by the Great Fire of London, and rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was badly damaged by bombing during the Second World War, and the remains were demolished in 1962.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1962, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished, Former Church of England church buildings, Former churches in London
St Lawrence Jewry (Q11704046)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Lawrence Jewry next Guildhall is a Church of England guild church in the City of London on Gresham Street, next to the Guildhall. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It is the official church of the Lord Mayor of London.

National Heritage List for England number: 1064673; website: http://www.stlawrencejewry.org.uk/

Whitefield's Tabernacle, Moorfields (Q7995850)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Whitefield's Tabernacle, Moorfields (also known as Moorfields Tabernacle) is a former church at the corner of Tabernacle Street and Leonard Street, Moorfields, London, England. The first church on the site was a wooden building erected by followers of the evangelical preacher George Whitefield in 1741. This was replaced by a brick building in 1753. John Wesley preached a sermon "On the death of the Rev Mr George Whitefield" both here and at Whitefield's Tabernacle, Tottenham Court Road in 1770.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former Methodist churches in the United Kingdom
St John the Baptist upon Walbrook (Q14956695)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St John the Baptist upon Walbrook was a parish church in the City of London. It stood in Walbrook Ward, with parts of the parish extending into Cordwainer, Dowgate and Vintry Wards. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
Holy Trinity the Less (Q14956694)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Holy Trinity the Less was a parish church in Knightrider Street in the City of London, destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Following the fire the site was used for a Lutheran church, which was eventually demolished in 1871 to make way for Mansion House underground station.

St Peter, Paul's Wharf (Q14956701)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Peter, Paul's Wharf, was a Church of England parish church in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666.

St Thomas the Apostle (Q16897109)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Thomas the Apostle was a parish church in Knightrider Street in the City of London. In existence by the late twelfth century, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
Chapel Keeper's House, Wesley's Chapel (Q26490111)
item type: chapel

National Heritage List for England number: 1195539

The Chapel, Grays Inn Square (Q27084370)
item type: chapel

National Heritage List for England number: 1322148

New Gallery (Q7007729)
item type: church building / movie theater / shop / art gallery
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The New Gallery is a Crown Estate-owned Grade II Listed building at 121 Regent Street, London, which originally was an art gallery from 1888 to 1910, The New Gallery Restaurant from 1910 to 1913, The New Gallery Cinema from 1913 to 1953, and a Seventh-day Adventist Church from 1953 to 1992. After having been empty for more than ten years, the building was a Habitat furniture store from 2006 to 2011, and since September 2012 it is a flagship store for Burberry.

Street address: 121-125 Regent Street, London, W1B 4TB, England (from Wikidata)

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: 1910 disestablishments in England, Defunct art galleries in London
Regent Hall (Q7308084)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Regent Hall is a Salvation Army centre on London's Oxford Street. It is one of the oldest centres in London having been founded by the founder of the army, William Booth in 1882. The church is known as the "Rink", because it was formerly a skating rink.

Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Family in Exile (Q2942529)
item type: cathedral
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Cathedral of the Holy Family, previously Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Family in Exile, (Ukrainian: Українська Католицька Катедра "Пресвятої Родини") is the cathedral of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Eparchy of Holy Family of London. It is the seat of the nation's Ukrainian Catholic Eparchial bishop, and overlaps in jurisdiction with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster, among others.

website: http://parish.rcdow.org.uk/ukrainianchurch//; National Heritage List for England number: 1210923

St Mary's Church, Charing Cross Road (Q7594297)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary's Church, Charing Cross Road (in full, St Mary the Virgin), was an Anglican church in Charing Cross Road (originally Crown Street), Westminster, from 1851. The building was formerly the site of an ancient church, called 'The Greek Church', and St Mary's was never fully built, with only the chancel and the north aisle being completed. The structure was demolished in the 1930s.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: 1934 disestablishments in England, Demolished buildings and structures in London, Former Church of England church buildings, Former churches in the City of Westminster
Whitefield's Tabernacle, Tottenham Court Road (Q7995852)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Whitefield's Tabernacle, also called Tottenham Court Road Chapel, is a church on Tottenham Court Road, London, England. It is now the home of the American International Church.

West Street Chapel (Q7986597)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The West Street Chapel is a former chapel at 26 West Street, London WC2. It was John Wesley’s first Methodist chapel in London's West End.

Westminster Meeting House (Q27083064)
item type: Friends meeting house
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Westminster Meeting House is a Friends meeting house (a Quaker place of worship) at 52 St Martin's Lane in Covent Garden, London WC1. It shares its frontage with an adjoining shop. The Westminster friends have been meeting at this location since 1883.

website: http://www.westminsterquakers.org.uk/; National Heritage List for England number: 1264792

St Christopher's Chapel (Q17542517)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Christopher's Chapel is the chapel of Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, England. It is a grade II* listed building and is noted for its highly decorated interior.

National Heritage List for England number: 1113211

Mortuary Chapel In St Georges Gardens (Q27086203)
item type: sepulchral chapel

National Heritage List for England number: 1378728

Swiss Protestant Church (Q26347800)
item type: church building

National Heritage List for England number: 1078294

Former Welsh Presbyterian Church (Q27080619)
item type: church building

National Heritage List for England number: 1217930

St John's Chapel (Q2403338)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. John's Chapel is located in the Tower of London. The building dates from 1080.

website: http://www.hrp.org.uk/tower-of-london/history-and-stories/discover-the-towers/the-chapel-of-st-johns/

Chapel of St Thomas on the Bridge (Q21207990)
item type: bridge chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Chapel of St Thomas on the Bridge was a bridge chapel built near the centre of "Old" London Bridge in the City of London and was completed by 1209. In 1548, during the Reformation, it was dissolved as a place of worship and soon afterwards converted to secular use. The building survived as a dwelling and warehouse until 1747 when the upper storey at street level was removed; the lower storey, which was built into the structure of one of the piers, remained in use as a store until Old London Bridge was demolished in 1832.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1832, Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Ann Blackfriars (Q7592469)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Ann Blackfriars was a church in the City of London, in what is now Ireland Yard in the ward of Farringdon Within. The church began as a medieval parish chapel, dedicated to St Ann, within the Dominican Black Friars church. The new parish church was established in the 16th century to serve the inhabitants of the precincts of the former Dominican monastery, following its dissolution under King Henry VIII. It was near the Blackfriars Theatre, a fact which displeased its congregation. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in the 17th century, Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Thomas' Church (Q7591864)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Thomas Church, Southwark, London, England. The first church building was part of the original St. Thomas' Hospital which was located to the area around the present St Thomas Street, from the infirmary at St Mary Overie priory in 1212. The hospital was therefore also an Augustinian house. The hospital/conventual precinct became a parish no later than 1496. It was named after Thomas Becket whose cult pilgrimage to Canterbury began at London Bridge. The church was renamed St Thomas the Apostle following the abolition of the Becket cult in 1538 during the Reformation.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former Church of England church buildings, Former churches in the London Borough of Southwark
Surrey Chapel (Q7646777)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Surrey Chapel (1783-1881) was an independent Methodist and Congregational church established in Blackfriars Road, Southwark, London on 8 June 1783 by the Rev. Rowland Hill. His work was continued in 1833 by the Congregational pastor Rev. James Sherman, and in 1854 by Rev. Newman Hall. The chapel's design attracted great interest, being circular in plan with a domed roof. When built it was set in open fields, but within a few years it became a new industrial area with a vast population characterised by great poverty amidst pockets of wealth. Recently the site itself has been redeveloped as an office block (currently occupied by the London Development Agency), and Southwark Underground Station has been built opposite.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former Methodist churches in the United Kingdom, Former buildings and structures in the London Borough of Southwark, Former churches in the London Borough of Southwark
Portico of Unitarian Chapel (Q27086832)
item type: chapel

National Heritage List for England number: 1385935

Former Church of St Jude (Q26665623)
item type: church building

National Heritage List for England number: 1385857

Henry VII Lady Chapel (Q3306162)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Henry VII Lady Chapel, now more often known just as the Henry VII Chapel, is a large Lady chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey, paid for by the will of King Henry VII. It is separated from the rest of the abbey by brass gates and a flight of stairs.

St Stephen's Chapel (Q7595468)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Stephen's Chapel, sometimes called the Royal Chapel of St Stephen, was a chapel in the old Palace of Westminster which served as the chamber of the House of Commons of England and that of Great Britain from 1547 to 1834. It was largely destroyed in the fire of 1834, but the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft in the crypt survived.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of Westminster
St Mary Undercroft (Q16900474)
item type: chapel
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Chapel of St Mary Undercroft is a Church of England chapel in the Palace of Westminster, London, England.

Chapel Royal (Q1062692)
item type: Royal chapels
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The Chapel Royal is an establishment in the Royal Household serving the spiritual needs of the sovereign of the British royal family. Historically it was a body of priests and singers that travelled with the monarch. The term is now also applied to the chapels within royal palaces, most notably at Hampton Court and St James's Palace, and other chapels within the Commonwealth designated as such by the monarch. Within the Church of England, some of these royal chapels may also be referred to as Royal Peculiars, an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the monarch.

Church of St Mary (Q17552830)
item type: museum / former church

National Heritage List for England number: 1080380

Dean's Residence, Queen's Chapel (Q17527302)
item type: chapel

National Heritage List for England number: 1239701

Enon Chapel (Q5379392)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Enon Chapel was a building on Clement's Lane (today St. Clement's Lane) off Aldwych near the Strand in London and it was built around 1823. The upper part was dedicated to the worship of God, with the dead buried in a vault beneath, separated by a board floor. The chapel was notorious for allegations that thousands of bodies had been packed into the vault room in the space of 20 years.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former Church of England church buildings, Former buildings and structures in the City of Westminster
All Hallows Bread Street (Q4728787)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

All Hallows Bread Street was a parish church in the Bread Street ward of the City of London. It stood on the east side of Bread Street, on the corner with Watling Street. First mentioned in the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren and demolished in 1876.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1878, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
All-Hallows-the-Great (Q4727832)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

All-Hallows-the-Great was a church in the City of London, located on what is now Upper Thames Street, first mentioned in 1235. Destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, the church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. All-Hallows-the-Great was demolished in 1894 when many bodies were disinterred from the churchyard and reburied at Brookwood Cemetery.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1894, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished, Demolished buildings and structures in London
All Hallows Honey Lane (Q4728798)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

All Hallows, Honey Lane was a parish church in the City of London, England. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt; the site became part of Honey Lane Market, which was in turn partially cleared to make way for the City of London School in the 19th century. Much of the area was destroyed during the bombing in World War II and has been redeveloped. The name Honey Lane is retained in a nearby walkway.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
All-Hallows-the-Less (Q4727833)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

All-Hallows-the-Less (also known as All-Hallows-upon-the-Cellar) was a church in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Olave's Church (Q7594990)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Olave's Church, Southwark was a church in Southwark, England which is believed to be mentioned in the Domesday Book. It was located on Tooley Street which is named after the church, i.e. 't'olous'. It became redundant in 1926 and was demolished. It is now the location of St Olaf House, which houses part of the London Bridge Hospital.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1926, Former Church of England church buildings, Former buildings and structures in the London Borough of Southwark, Former churches in the London Borough of Southwark
St Christopher le Stocks (Q7592805)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Christopher le Stocks was a parish church on the south side of Threadneedle Street in the Broad Street Ward of the City of London. Of Medieval origin, it was rebuilt following the Great Fire of London in 1666, but demolished in 1781 to make way for an extension of the neighbouring Bank of England.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1782, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St. Mary Magdalen, Milk Street (Q7590497)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Magdalen, Milk Street, was a parish church in the City of London, England. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Antholin, Budge Row (Q7592497)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Antholin, Budge Row, or St Antholin, Watling Street, was a church in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren, following its destruction in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The 17th-century building was demolished in 1874.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1874, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Benet Fink (Q7592647)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Benet Fink was a church and parish in the City of London located on what is now Threadneedle Street. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, then rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. The Wren church was demolished between 1841 and 1846.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Benet Gracechurch (Q7592649)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Benet Gracechurch (or Grass Church), so called because a haymarket existed nearby (Cobb), was a parish church in the City of London. First recorded in the 11th century, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666 and rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The church was demolished in 1868.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: 1868 disestablishments in England, Buildings and structures demolished in 1868, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Botolph Billingsgate (Q7592693)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Botolph's, Billingsgate was a Church of England parish church in London. Of medieval origin, it was located in the Billingsgate ward of the City of London and destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St. Michael, Crooked Lane (Q7590721)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Augustine Papey (Q7592556)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Augustine Papey was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated just south of London Wall opposite the north end of St. Mary Axe Street. First mentioned as "Sci augustini pappey", it originally belonged to the Priory of Holy Trinity. By 1430, the emoluments had become so small that it was united with All Hallows-on-the-Wall and in 1442 was appropriated as an almshouse for elderly clergy. At the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries it was demolished and the site built over. The churchyard was acquired by St Martin Outwich in 1539, and survives to this day on Camomile Street

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Alphege London Wall (Q7592313)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Alphege or St Alphage London Wall was a church in Bassishaw Ward in the City of London, built directly upon London Wall. It was also known as St Alphege Cripplegate, from its proximity to Cripplegate. It is now operated as St Alphege Gardens.

National Heritage List for England number: 1193558

St Andrew Hubbard (Q7592415)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Andrew Hubbard was a parish church in the Billingsgate ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and not rebuilt.

St Augustine Watling Street (Q7592558)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Augustine, Watling Street was an Anglican church which stood just to the east of St Paul's Cathedral in the City of London. First recorded in the 12th century, it was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt to the designs of Christopher Wren. This building was destroyed by bombing during the Second World War, and its remains now form part of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School.

National Heritage List for England number: 1079121

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Bartholomew-by-the-Exchange (Q7592615)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Bartholomew-by-the-Exchange was a church and parish in the City of London located on Bartholomew Lane, off Threadneedle Street. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1840.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1840, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Margaret Pattens (Q7594134)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.

National Heritage List for England number: 1286593; website: http://www.stmargaretpattens.org

St Mary Staining (Q7594602)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Mary Staining was a parish church in Oat Lane, northeast of St. Paul's Cathedral, in the City of London. First recorded in the 12th century, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Faith under St Paul's (Q7593059)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Faith under St Paul's in Castle Baynard Ward was an unusual parish within the City of London. The church was physically removed in 1256 to allow for the eastern expansion of Old St Paul's Cathedral.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Gabriel Fenchurch (Q7593107)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Gabriel Fenchurch (or Fen Church as recorded on the Ordnance Survey) was a parish church in the Langbourn Ward of the City of London, destroyed in the Great Fire of London and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St George Botolph Lane (Q7593210)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St George Botolph Lane was a church off Eastcheap, in the ward of Billingsgate in the City of London. The rear of the church overlooked Pudding Lane, where the fire of London started. It was first recorded in the twelfth century, and destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. It was one of the 51 churches rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The church was demolished in 1904.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Gregory by St Paul's (Q7593298)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Gregory's by St Paul's was a parish church in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not replaced. It was built against the walls of St Paul's Cathedral.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Leonard, Foster Lane (Q7594004)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Leonard, Foster Lane, was a Church of England church dedicated to Leonard of Noblac on the west side of Foster Lane in the Aldersgate ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Martin Outwich (Q7594212)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Martin Outwich was a parish church in the City of London, on the corner of Threadneedle Street and Bishopsgate. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt at the end of the 18th century and demolished in 1874.

St Mary Aldermanbury (Q7594557)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Mary Aldermanbury was a church in the City of London first mentioned in 1181 and destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rebuilt in Portland stone by Christopher Wren, it was again gutted by the Blitz in 1940, leaving only the walls standing. These stones were transported to Fulton, Missouri in 1966, by the residents of that town, and rebuilt in the grounds of Westminster College as a memorial to Winston Churchill. Churchill had made his Sinews of Peace, "Iron Curtain" speech in the Westminster College Gymnasium in 1946.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Mary Mounthaw (Q7594597)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Mounthaw or Mounthaut was a parish church in Old Fish Street Hill in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Katherine Coleman (Q7593888)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Katherine Coleman was a parish church in the City of London, situated in St Katherine's Row, on the south side of Fenchurch Street, in Aldgate Ward. Of medieval origin, it narrowly escaped destruction in the Great Fire of London in 1666, but was rebuilt in the eighteenth century. The church closed in November 1926 and was demolished soon afterwards.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1926, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Margaret, New Fish Street (Q7594128)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Margaret, New Fish Street, was a parish church in the City of London.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mary Woolchurch Haw (Q7594605)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Woolchurch Haw was a parish church in the City of London, destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666 and not rebuilt. It came within the ward of Walbrook.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Michael-le-Querne (Q7594824)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Michael-le-Querne, also called St Michael ad Bladum, was a parish church in the Farringdon Within Ward in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666 and not rebuilt. The name is apparently a reference to a quern-stone as there was a corn market in the churchyard.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St John's Chapel, Bedford Row (Q7593534)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St John's Chapel, Bedford Row, in Bloomsbury, London, was a proprietary chapel and the home of a large evangelical Anglican congregation in the 19th century. According to The Eclectic Review it was built for people who seceded from the congregation of St Andrew's, Holborn after Henry Sacheverell was forced on them by Queen Anne in 1713. It was located at the northwest corner of Millman Street and Chapel Street (now Rugby Street), Holborn, London, in the proximity of Bedford Row.

St Leonard, Eastcheap (Q7594003)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Leonard, Eastcheap, sometimes referred to as St Leonard Milkchurch, was a parish church in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt. The site of the church was retained as a graveyard.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
Church of St Mary Axe (Q7594559)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Axe was a mediaeval church in the City of London. (The church that remains in the modern-day St Mary Axe is St Andrew Undershaft.) Its full name was St Mary, St Ursula and her 11,000 Virgins, and it was also sometimes referred to as St Mary Pellipar. Its common name (also St Mary [or Marie] at the Axe) derives from the sign of an axe over the east end of the church. The church's patrons were the Skinners' Company.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Dionis Backchurch (Q7592958)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Dionis Backchurch was a parish church in the Langbourn ward of the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt after the Great Fire of London to the designs of Christopher Wren and demolished in 1878.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1878, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St James Duke's Place (Q7593491)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St James Duke's Place was an Anglican parish church in the Aldgate ward of the City of London It was established in the early 17th century, rebuilt in 1727 and closed and demolished in 1874.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1874, Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St John the Evangelist Friday Street (Q7593807)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St John the Evangelist Friday Street was a church in Bread Street Ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, and not rebuilt, the parish being united with that of All Hallows Bread Street.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mary Bothaw (Q7594560)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Bothaw (or Saint Mary Boatehaw by the Erber) was a parish church in the Walbrook ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt, although some of its materials were used in the rebuilding of St Swithin, London Stone, whose parish it was merged with.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mary Colechurch (Q7594561)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mary Colechurch was a parish church in the City of London destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mary Magdalen Old Fish Street (Q7594570)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Mary Magdalen Old Fish Street was a church in Castle Baynard ward of the City of London, England, located on the corner of Old Fish Street and Old Change, on land now covered by post-War development. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church suffered damage to its roof from a fire in an adjacent warehouse in 1886. It was not repaired and finally demolished in 1893.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1893, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Martin Vintry (Q7594215)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Martin Vintry was a parish church in the Vintry ward of the City of London, England. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and never rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Matthew Friday Street (Q7594710)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1885, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Laurence Pountney (Q7593938)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Laurence Pountney was a Church of England parish church in the Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Martin Pomary (Q7594214)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Martin Pomeroy was a parish church in the Cheap ward of the City of London. It was also known as St Martin Ironmonger Lane.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
Christ Church Greyfriars (Q1077970)
item type: church ruin
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

Christ Church Greyfriars, also known as Christ Church Newgate Street, was a church in Newgate Street, opposite St Paul's Cathedral in the City of London. Established as a monastic church in the thirteenth century, it became a parish church after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Following its destruction in the Great Fire of London of 1666, it was rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. Except for the tower, the church was largely destroyed by bombing during the Second World War. The decision was made not to rebuild the church; the ruins are now a public garden.

National Heritage List for England number: 1359217

St Olave Old Jewry (Q7594994)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Olave's Church, Old Jewry sometimes known as Upwell Old Jewry was a church in the City of London located between the street called Old Jewry and Ironmonger Lane. Destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, the church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The church was demolished in 1887, except for the tower and west wall, which remain today.

National Heritage List for England number: 1359180

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1887, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Olave Silver Street (Q7594995)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Olave's Church, Silver Street was a church on the south side of Silver Street, off Wood Street in the Aldersgate ward of the City of London. It was dedicated to St Olaf, a Norwegian Christian ally of the English king Ethelred II. The church was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Peter le Poer (Q7595370)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Peter le Poer was a parish church on the west side of Broad Street in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt in 1540, and again in 1792 to a design by Jesse Gibson with a circular nave. It was demolished in 1907.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Peter, Westcheap (Q7595344)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Peter, Westcheap, also called "St Peter Cheap", "St Peter at the Cross in Cheap", or "Ecclesia S. Petri de Wodestreet", was a parish and parish church of medieval origins in the City of London. The church stood at the south-west corner of Wood Street where it opens onto Cheapside, directly facing the old Cheapside Cross. In its heyday it was a familiar landmark where the City waits used to stand on the roof and play as the great processions went past. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, together with most of its surroundings, and was never rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Michael Wood Street (Q7594836)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Michael’s Wood Street was a church and parish of medieval origin in Cripplegate Ward in the City of London, and is first mentioned in 1225 as St. Michael de Wudestrate. It stood on the west side of Wood Street, initially with a frontage on Huggin Lane but later on Wood Street itself.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished, Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mildred, Bread Street (Q7594882)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

The church of St Mildred, Bread Street, stood on the east side of Bread Street in the Bread Street Ward of the City of London. It was dedicated to the 7th century Saint Mildred the Virgin, daughter of Merewald, sub-king of the West Mercians. Of medieval origin, the church was rebuilt to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following its destruction in the Great Fire of London in 1666. One of the few City churches to retain Wren's original fittings into the 20th century, St Mildred's was destroyed by bombs in 1941.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished, Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Nicholas Olave (Q7594958)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

A former church in the City of London, on the west side of Bread Street Hill in Queenhithe Ward.
The Mortality Bill for the year 1665, published by the Parish Clerk’s Company, shows 97 parishes within the City of London. By September 6 the city lay in ruins, 86 churches having been destroyed in the Fire of London. In 1670 a Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under the stewardship of Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. Fifty-one were chosen, but not St Nicholas Olave. Its unusual dedication refers to the earlier amalgamation between two parishes: St Nicholas and St Olave Bradestrat, which was removed by the Austin Friars for the erection of their monastic buildings. Described by John Stow as a “convenient church” the parish had strong connections with the Fishmongers, many of whom were buried in the churchyard. Its eminent organist William Blitheman also lay here. Following the fire it was united with St Nicholas Cole Abbey and partial records survive and are available in the International Genealogical Index.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London
St Mildred, Poultry (Q7594883)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Mildred, Poultry was a parish church in the Cheap ward of the City of London. It was rebuilt after the Great Fire of London, and demolished in 1872. St Mildred in the Poultry was the burial place of the writer Thomas Tusser. Some description of the church and its monuments is given in John Stow's Survey of London.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Buildings and structures demolished in 1872, Churches rebuilt after the Great Fire of London but since demolished
St Nicholas Acons (Q7594946)
item type: church building
Summary from English Wikipedia (enwiki)

St Nicholas Acons was a parish church in the City of London. In existence by the late 11th century, it was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of 1666 and not rebuilt.

This item might be defunct. The English Wikipedia article is in these categories: Former buildings and structures in the City of London