London Borough of Southwark

London Borough of Southwark, London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
category: boundary — type: administrative — OSM: relation 8450265

Items with no match found in OSM

917 items

Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey (Q1749030)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey was a Metropolitan borough in the County of London, created in 1900 by the London Government Act 1899. It was abolished and its area became part of the London Borough of Southwark in 1965.\n

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Metropolitan Borough of Southwark (Q522139)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Metropolitan Borough of Southwark (Br [ˈsʌðɨk]) was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1900 to 1965. It was created to cover the western section of the ancient borough of Southwark and formed the northwestern part of the current London Borough of Southwark. In common with the rest of inner London, the borough experienced a steady decline in population throughout its existence. The borough council made an unsuccessful attempt to gain city status in 1955.\n

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Kaplan Business School (Q6366808)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Kaplan Business School is an Australian independent higher education institution.\xa0It started offering degrees in Adelaide in 2008 before expanding across Australia to the other major state capital cities. It is part of Kaplan International, headquartered in London, which is a division of Kaplan Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Graham Holdings Company, formerly known as The Washington Post Company.

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Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (Q5086807)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) is a professional membership body concerned with environmental health and promoting standards in the training and education of environmental health professionals.\n

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Peek Freans (Q699080)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Peek Freans is the name of a former biscuit making company based in Bermondsey, London, which is now a global brand of biscuits and related confectionery owned by various food businesses. Owned but not marketed in the UK, Europe and USA by De Beauvoir Biscuit Company, in Canada the brand is owned by Mondelēz International, whilst in Pakistan the brand is owned by English Biscuit Manufacturers.\n

'}
National Youth Theatre (Q2087430)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The National Youth Theatre of Great Britain is a registered charity in London. It is committed to the development of young people through the medium of creative arts, and aims to use theatre to aid in this objective. It was founded in 1956 as the world's first youth theatre, and has built a reputation for producing actors such as Daniel Craig, Daniel Day-Lewis, Timothy Dalton, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Colin Firth, Ian McShane, Helen Mirren, Rosamund Pike and David Suchet CBE.

"}
Alzheimer Disease International (Q1958919)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Alzheimer Disease International (ADI), was founded in 1984 to help to fight Alzheimer's disease, first diagnosed back in 1906. ADI is the umbrella organisation of more than 80 Alzheimer’s associations around the world. Each member supports people with dementia and their families in their country. ADI's vision is an improved quality of life for people with dementia and their families throughout the world.

"}
Bermondsey Abbey (Q822030)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bermondsey Abbey was an English Benedictine monastery. Most widely known as an 11th-century foundation, it had a precursor mentioned in the early eighth century, and was centred on what is now Bermondsey Square, the site of Bermondsey Market, Bermondsey, in the London Borough of Southwark, southeast London, England.\n

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Blackfriars Road railway station (Q4922909)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Blackfriars Road was a short-lived railway station on the South Eastern Railway (SER) line, between Charing Cross and London Bridge. It was opened in 1864 with the name Blackfriars but closed less than five years later. It is now retrospectively known as Blackfriars Road to distinguish it from the current Blackfriars station. The former entrance to Blackfriars Road station under the railway bridge on Blackfriars Road itself is still clearly visible.

'}
A2216 road (Q4649016)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The A2216 is an A road in South London. It runs from Denmark Hill to Sydenham. Part of the road is an ancient thoroughfare, Lordship Lane. In Dulwich the road runs via the South Circular Road.\n

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Bermondsey Market (Q4892592)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bermondsey Market (also known as New Caledonian Market and Bermondsey Square Antiques Market) is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.\n

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Addington Square (Q4681190)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Addington Square is a Georgian and Regency garden square in Camberwell in the London Borough of Southwark which is named after the early 19th century prime minister Henry Addington.

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Bellenden Road (Q4883798)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bellenden Road is a street in southeast London. The local area around it, situated between Peckham, Camberwell and East Dulwich, is known as Bellenden.

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Bermondsey Settlement (Q4892591)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Bermondsey Settlement was a settlement house founded in Bermondsey, South-East London, by the Rev'd John Scott Lidgett. It was the only Methodist foundation among the settlements that appeared in the late 19th and early 20th century. Like other settlement houses it offered social, health and educational services to the poor of its neighbourhood. It was particularly concerned with educational matters (Lidgett was a prominent educationist) including music and dance. It is noted for the work of one of its residents, Grace Kimmins, in relation to children's play. Other notable residents included the radical nonconformist Hugh Price Hughes, Grace Kimmins' husband Charles William Kimmins, English socialist and pacifist Ada Salter, and doctor and political radical Alfred Salter.\n

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A200 road (Q4648986)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The A200 is an A road in London running from London Bridge to Greenwich. It runs east from the A3 road along Duke Street Hill, then Tooley Street and Jamaica Road, following the River Thames until the junction with Rotherhithe Tunnel when it turns south down Lower Road. It follows the Thames again in Deptford, after passing Surrey Quays and becoming Evelyn Street. At the junction with Deptford Church Street it turns due east along Creek Road, over Deptford Creek to finish by the Cutty Sark at Greenwich Church Street, part of the A206 road.\n

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Proposed Bakerloo line extension (Q4849252)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Bakerloo line extension is a proposed southern extension of the London Underground Bakerloo line in South London from its current terminus at Elephant & Castle. An extension to Camberwell was due to be built in the late 1940s, but the project was cancelled. In the 21st century the project has been revived in one version or another, with plans for an extension to be completed by 2028 or 2029. There has been a more concrete proposal, which is to extend to Lewisham; Camberwell was originally proposed as a short-range destination for a southern extension of the Bakerloo line, but it is now widely viewed that the extension will continue below ground to Lewisham station and then above ground via Catford Bridge railway station to take over the Hayes line.

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Blackfriars Rotunda (Q4922910)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Blackfriars Rotunda was a building in Southwark, near the end of Blackfriars Bridge across the River Thames in London, that existed from 1787 to 1958 in various forms. It initially housed the collection of the Leverian Museum after it had been disposed of by lottery. For a period it was home to the Surrey Institution. In the early 1830s it notoriously was the centre for the activities of the Rotunda radicals. Its subsequent existence was long but less remarkable.\n

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Borough High Street (Q4946315)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Borough High Street is a road in Southwark, London, running south-west from London Bridge, forming part of the A3 route which runs from London to Portsmouth, on the south coast of England.\n

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A215 road (Q4649008)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The A215 is an A road in South London, starting at Elephant and Castle and finishing around Shirley. It runs through the London Boroughs of Lambeth, Southwark and Croydon.\n

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2009 Lakanal House tower block fire (Q4614169)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Lakanal House fire occurred in a tower block on 3 July 2009 in Camberwell, London. Six people were killed, and at least twenty injured, when a high-rise fire developed and spread through a number of flats in the twelve-storey building.\n

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Aram's New Ground (Q4783908)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nAram\'s New Ground was a cricket venue in Montpelier Gardens, Walworth. Named after its founder George Aram, it was the home of Montpelier Cricket Club and hosted major matches from 1796 to 1806. It was also known as the "Bee Hive Ground" because of its proximity to the Bee Hive pub in Walworth.

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Borough Road (Q4946324)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Borough Road is in Southwark, London SE1. It runs east-west between St George's Circus and Borough High Street.\n

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Anglo-Saxon London (Q338466)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The history of Anglo-Saxon London relates to the history of the city of London during the Anglo-Saxon period, during the 7th to 11th centuries.\n

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Resonance FM (Q2145837)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Resonance 104.4 FM is a London based non-profit community radio station specialising in the arts run by the London Musicians' Collective (LMC). The station is staffed by four permanent staff members, including programme controller Ed Baxter and over 300 volunteer technical and production staff.\n

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Shad Thames (Q2276190)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Shad Thames is a historic riverside street next to Tower Bridge in Bermondsey, London, England, and is also an informal name for the surrounding area. In the 19th century, the area included the largest warehouse complex in London.\n

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Cuckold's Point (Q5192350)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Cuckold's Point is part of a sharp bend on the River Thames on the Rotherhithe peninsula, south-east London, opposite the West India Docks and to the north of Columbia Wharf. The name comes from a post surmounted by a pair of horns that used to stand at the location, a symbol commemorating the starting point of the riotous Horn Fair, which can also symbolise a cuckold, a man whose wife had openly cheated on him.\n

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Ceri Hand Gallery (Q5064231)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nThe Ceri Hand Gallery was a commercial contemporary art gallery based in London, England. It opened in Liverpool in July 2008 and relocated to 71 Monmouth Street, Covent Garden, London, WC2 in June 2012, later moving to 6 Copperfield Street, London, SE1 in 2013. The gallery closed on 30 April 2014.\n

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Devon Mansions (Q5267739)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Devon Mansions are a set of five residential mansion block buildings situated along the south side of Tooley Street in Bermondsey, London. The buildings are located within the London Borough of Southwark and are included in both the Tower Bridge and Tooley Street Conservation Areas.

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Canary Wharf – Rotherhithe Ferry (Q5031206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Canary Wharf – Rotherhithe Ferry is a passenger ferry across the River Thames in the south east of London, England. The service connects Canary Wharf Pier, serving the major Canary Wharf office development north of the river, with Nelson Dock Pier at the Hilton Hotel in Rotherhithe.\n

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Clink Street (Q5133874)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Clink Street is a street in Bankside, London, UK, between Southwark Cathedral and the Globe Theatre.\n

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London Dial-a-Ride (Q2570835)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

London Dial-a-Ride run by Transport for London (TfL) is a door-to-door paratransit transport service for people with a permanent or long term disability or health problem who are unable, or virtually unable to use public transport.

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Great Dover Street (Q5599074)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Great Dover Street is a road in Southwark, south London, England. At the northwest end it joins Marshalsea Road and Borough High Street and there is a junction with Long Lane; Borough Underground station is at this location. At the southeast end is the Bricklayers Arms roundabout and flyover. The road is part of the A2 and this continues south-east as the Old Kent Road.\n

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Jubilee Greenway (Q6301853)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Jubilee Greenway is a walking and cycling route in London, England. It was completed in 2012 to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. The 60 kilometres (37\xa0mi) route of continuous paths links 2012 Olympic and Paralympic venues with parks, waterways and other attractions.\n

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Hawker Hunter Tower Bridge incident (Q5684962)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hawker Hunter Tower Bridge incident occurred on 5 April 1968 when Royal Air Force (RAF) Hawker Hunter pilot Alan Pollock performed unauthorised low flying over several London landmarks and then flew through the span of Tower Bridge on the Thames. His actions were to mark the 50th anniversary of the founding of the RAF and as a demonstration against the Ministry of Defence for not recognising it.

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Honor Oak Cricket Club Ground (Q5896822)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Honor Oak Cricket Club Ground is a cricket ground in Dulwich, London (formerly Surrey). In 1921 the club was described as one of the oldest and best cricket clubs in Surrey, having supplied several players to the county club. In that year Honor Oak played Guy's Hospital in a charity game in aid of blinded soldiers and sailors. The club side eleven included England player, EG Hayes. and George Abel, son of R Abel. The first archived scorecard for a match on the ground was in 1929. In 1943, the Buccaneers played Northamptonshire in a wartime charity match. In 1967, the ground hosted a single Second XI Championship match between the Surrey Second XI and the Glamorgan Second XI.

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Gabriel's Wharf (Q5515503)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

,

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Horsemonger Lane Gaol (Q5556400)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Horsemonger Lane Gaol (also known as the Surrey County Gaol or the New Gaol) was a prison close to present-day Newington Causeway in Southwark, south London. Built at the end of the 18th century, it was in use until 1878.\n

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Homestall Farm (Q5890474)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Homestall Farm consisted of a farm house, barn, and substantial land surrounding it, and was located on the site of what is now Peckham Rye park in southeast London, England. The farm was acquired by the London County Council in 1894 for the sum of £51,000. The buildings were removed in 1908.\n

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Gallery Road (Q5519000)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Gallery Road is in West Dulwich, Southwark, southeast London, England.

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Lant Street (Q6487515)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lant Street is a street south of Marshalsea Road in Southwark, south London, England.

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Liberty of the Clink (Q6542201)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Liberty of the Clink was an area in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames, opposite the City of London. Although situated in Surrey the liberty was exempt from the jurisdiction of the county's high sheriff and was under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Winchester who was usually either the Chancellor or Treasurer of the King.

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John Smith House (Q6258392)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

John Smith House is the former Labour Party headquarters at 144-152 Walworth Road in south London. The party first occupied the building in 1980, vacating its former headquarters at Transport House.\n

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Kennington Park Road (Q6390917)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nKennington Park Road is a main road in south-east London, England, and is part of the A3 trunk road. It runs from Newington Butts at its Y-junction with Kennington Lane, south-west to the Oval, where the A3 continues as Clapham Road, towards Stockwell. At this crossroads junction, Camberwell New Road and Kennington Oval head towards Camberwell Green and Vauxhall respectively.\n

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King's Bench Prison (Q3403975)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The King's Bench Prison was a prison in Southwark, south London, England, from medieval times until it closed in 1880. It took its name from the King's Bench court of law in which cases of defamation, bankruptcy and other misdemeanours were heard; as such, the prison was often used as a debtor's prison until the practice was abolished in the 1860s. In 1842, it was renamed the Queen's Bench Prison, and became the Southwark Convict Prison in 1872.

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Union Street (Q2947639)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Union Street is a major street in the London Borough of Southwark. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east. Southwark Bridge Road crosses in the middle.\n

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Spa Road Junction rail crash (Q7572151)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Spa Road Junction rail crash was an accident on the British railway system which occurred during the peak evening rush hour of 8 January 1999 at Spa Road Junction in Bermondsey, in South East London.\n

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Southwark Street (Q7571171)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark Street is a major street in Bankside in the London Borough of Southwark, in London England, just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east. It also connects the access routes for London Bridge, Southwark Bridge and Blackfriars Bridge. At the eastern end to the north is Borough Market. \n

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Southwark Bridge Road (Q7571130)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark Bridge Road is a road in Southwark, London, England, between Newington Causeway near Elephant and Castle and Southwark Bridge across the River Thames, leading to the City of London, in a meandering route.\n

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Southwark Playhouse (Q7571159)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark Playhouse is a theatre in London, located between Borough and Elephant and Castle tube stations.\n

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Rouel Road (Q7370757)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Rouel Road is a street in the Bermondsey area of south London.\n

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Revolving Doors Agency (Q7318955)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Revolving Doors Agency (RDA), also known as Revolving Doors, is a charitable organisation in the United Kingdom which works across England and Wales. Through research, policy and campaigning work, the organisation aims to improve services for people with multiple needs who are in repeat contact with the criminal justice system.

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Shakespeare's Globe Centres (Q7462765)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Shakespeare's Globe Centres are international centres for theatrical education and for the promotion of the Shakespeare's Globe in London, their nucleus organisation.\n

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St George's Road (Q7593186)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St George's Road is a one-way road in Southwark, London running between Westminster Bridge Road to the northwest and Elephant and Castle to the southeast. Its name derives from its crossing of St George's Fields, being an open rural area of the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The road was laid out as part of the communications improvements for Westminster Bridge, from the 1740s, connecting the Bridge to the Elephant and Castle junctions with New Kent Road, Walworth Road and Kennington Park Road.\n

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Montpelier Cricket Club (Q6906187)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\n\nThe Montpelier Cricket Club was prominent in English cricket from about 1796, when it began to compete against Marylebone Cricket Club and other leading "town clubs", until 1845 when its members were the prime movers in the formation of Surrey County Cricket Club. Montpelier was based at George Aram\'s New Ground in Montpelier Gardens, Walworth, Surrey. This was a top-class venue from 1796 to 1806. It was also known as the "Bee Hive Ground" because of its proximity to the Bee Hive pub in Walworth.

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Marshalsea Road (Q6773884)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Marshalsea Road (classified A3201) is a major street in Southwark, south London, England. At the northwest end is the Southwark Bridge Road. At the southeast end is Borough tube station on Borough High Street. Continuing across the street are Long Lane and Great Dover Street. At the northeast corner is the historic St George the Martyr church, where the Charles Dickens character Little Dorrit was married in Dickens' book of the same name. The area around Marshalsea Road has many Dickens associations.\n

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New Local Government Network (Q7009871)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The New Local Government Network (NLGN) is an independent think tank focused on local government reform. It was founded in 1996, and is currently based in Victoria, London. Its research and thought leadership programme seeks both practical impact for local government and partners, and to influence national policy priorities as they relate to places and public services.

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London Bridge Area Signalling Centre (Q6669891)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

London Bridge Area Signalling Centre (ASC) is a signalling centre on the Kent Route of Network Rail Ltd. on the railway in Great Britain, principally covering the line from London (Charing Cross, Cannon Street and London Bridge) to Kent and Sussex route areas of Network Rail Ltd. The signalling centre opened in 1974.\n

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Naval Enlisted Reserve Association (Q6981809)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Naval Enlisted Reserve Association (NERA) is a military advocacy group in the United States, who specifically address the agenda of sea-service reservists. Their stated mission is to protect the rights and benefits of enlisted sea-service reservists such as promotion, pay, retirement benefits, personnel strength, and equipment. NERA is a prominent member of a powerful coalition of military advocacy groups dedicated to fighting for service members in the Nation's Capitol.\n

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Lordship Lane (Q6680227)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lordship Lane is an ancient thoroughfare, once rural, in East Dulwich, a suburb of the London Borough of Southwark in southeast London, England, and forms part of the A2216.\n

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National Bakery School (Q6970863)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nThe National Bakery School, a culinary school at London South Bank University, London, England, was founded in 1894 and is now the world's oldest bakery school.

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New Kent Road (Q7009649)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

New Kent Road is a 1 kilometre (0.6\xa0mi) road in the London Borough of Southwark. The road was created in 1751 when the Turnpike Trust upgraded a local footpath. This was done as part of the general road improvements associated with the creation of Westminster Bridge; in effect it was possible to travel from the West End/ Westminster to the south-east without having to go via the Borough of Southwark but could now cross St George's Fields to the junction of Newington Causeway and Newington Butts which is where New Kent Road starts at Elephant and Castle. The route runs eastward for a few hundred yards to the junction of Great Dover Street and Tower Bridge Road, known as Bricklayers Arms, where it joins the original route to the south-east Old Kent Road (the A2).\n

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Newington Causeway (Q7018254)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Newington Causeway is a road in Southwark, London, between the Elephant and Castle and Borough High Street. Elephant & Castle Underground station is at the southern end. It follows the route of the old Roman road Stane Street.

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Tooley Street (Q7824079)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Tooley Street is a road in central and south London connecting London Bridge to St Saviour's Dock; it runs past Tower Bridge on the Southwark/Bermondsey side of the River Thames, and forms part of the A200 road. (grid reference TQ3380.)\n

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Suffolk Place (Q7634580)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Suffolk Place (or Suffolk House) was a mansion house located on the west side of Borough High Street in Southwark, Surrey, on the south bank of the River Thames opposite the City of London. It was the London town house of the Dukes of Suffolk, and was located near Winchester Palace, London seat of the Bishop of Winchester. The position was highly prominent as Borough High Street (or Southwark Street) was the principal thoroughfare leading from London Bridge and the City of London, to Canterbury and Dover, a route used by monarchs and others, including the pilgrims in Chaucer's Pilgrim's Progress. It was built in the fifteenth century and rebuilt in fine Renaissance style in 1522 by Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk (c.1484-1545) a favourite of King Henry VIII. On 4 February 1536 it was taken over by King Henry VIII who exchanged it with Brandon for Norwich Place on the Strand, on the north side of the Thames, nearer to the Palace of Westminster.\n

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Surrey Institution (Q7646824)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Surrey Institution was an organisation devoted to scientific, literary and musical education and research, based in London. It was founded by private subscription in 1807, taking the Royal Institution, founded in 1799, as a model. The Institution lasted only until 1823, when it was dissolved. (A separate and distinct charity, The Surrey Institution was formed in 1812 with aims to discharge persons confined to gaol in the county for debt. The Surrey Literary, Scientific and Zoological Institution founded in 1831 by Edward Cross was unconnected, being a vehicle for the Royal Surrey Gardens. )\n

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The Scoop (Q7762599)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Scoop is an outdoor amphitheatre situated on the south side of the River Thames near Tower Bridge in London, located next to City Hall, providing seating for approximately 800 people. Designed by Townshend Landscape Architects, it is a venue used during the summer to show films, musical performances and theatre productions by such companies as The Steam Industry and The Pantaloons. In June 2008, films shown at The Scoop included The Dam Busters, Atonement and Withnail and I. The Scoop has been used as a performance venue since 2002.

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Stave Hill (Q7604796)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Stave Hill is an artificial hill adjacent to the 5.2-acre (21,000\xa0m2) Stave Hill Ecological Park, it is part of Russia Dock Woodland, and is located in Rotherhithe, London. The woodland park occupies land that was previously Russia Dock and Stave Dock, both part of the Surrey Commercial Docks, which were filled in during the mid-1980s and then redeveloped by the London Docklands Development Corporation (LDDC).\n

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Southwark Coroner's Court (Q21062015)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Southwark Coroner's Court is the Coroner's Court for inner south London. It is located at Tennis Street, London. The court covers cases for the London boroughs of Greenwich, Lambeth, Lewisham and Southwark.

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A Pound of Flesh for 50p (Q18398139)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

A Pound of Flesh for 50p, also known as Melting House, was a temporary outdoor sculpture by artist Alex Chinneck, located in London, United Kingdom. Part of the city\'s Merge Festival, the two-story house sculpture was constructed from 8,000 paraffin wax bricks and it was designed to melt with assistance from a heating apparatus over the course of the installation, It was displayed from September 26 to November 18, 2014, at 40 Southwark Street, SE1 9HP. the structure\'s roof being gradually lowered as the wax melted. After it had been reduced to "a pile of hardened goo", the sculpture was removed.

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Trinity Church Square (Q18748741)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Trinity Church Square, formerly known as Trinity Square, is a garden square in Newington in the London Borough of Southwark.\n

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Albion Mills, Southwark (Q18204979)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Albion Mills was a steam-powered flour mill situated on the southeastern side of Blackfriars Bridge in northern Southwark, London, then in Surrey. Matthew Boulton began plans for the mill as early as 1783; it was completed in 1786, and gutted by fire in 1791. Most of the notable engineering drawings and depictions of Albion Mills are in the Birmingham Central Library.\n

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Rotherhithe crossing (Q21585376)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Rotherhithe crossing is a proposed route for pedestrians and cyclists across the River Thames in London, England between Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf.\n

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Africa Centre, London (Q24298839)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Africa Centre, London was founded in 1964 at 38 King Street, Covent Garden, where over the years it held many art exhibitions, conferences, lectures, and a variety of cultural events, as well as housing a gallery, meeting halls, restaurant, bar and bookshop. The Africa Centre closed its original venue in 2013, and now has a permanent home at 66 Great Suffolk Street, Southwark. It is a registered charity. The current director is Kenneth Olumuyiwa Tharp.\n

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Long Lane (Q18160760)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Long Lane is a street in the City of London, the historic and primary financial centre of London. \n

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1935 Summer Deaflympics (Q18589817)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The 1935 Summer Deaflympics officially known as 4th International Games for the Deaf was an international multi-sport event that was held from 17 August 1935 to 24 August 1935. It was hosted by London, England, with events held at White City Stadium.

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Newington Butts Theatre (Q18160968)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nThe Newington Butts Theatre was one of the earliest Elizabethan theatres, possibly predating even The Theatre of 1576 and the Curtain Theatre, which are usually regarded as the first dedicated playhouses in London. William Ingram believes it was probably the first of the three to begin construction, and may have been the first completed.

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Merrick Square (Q18748745)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Merrick Square is a garden square in Newington, London. The square is named after Christopher Merrick who in 1661 left land to Trinity House. There are 32 houses that were built from 1853 to 1872, and they overlook a private garden in the centre, which is still enclosed by its original 19th-century cast-iron railings.

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Blackwing Studios (Q880973)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Blackwing Studios was an English recording studio, most notable for early Depeche Mode and Yazoo recordings in the early 1980s.\n

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Canada Water (Q1032006)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Canada Water is an area of the Docklands in south-east London. It is named after a freshwater lake and wildlife refuge. Canada Water tube, Overground and bus station is immediately north of the lake, along with Canada Water Library which overhangs the lake and Deal Porter Square. Surrey Quays Shopping Centre is also adjacent, sitting immediately to the south. The surrounding area, which forms the town centre of Rotherhithe, is now increasingly known as Canada Water, after the transport interchange as much as the lake itself. The area is famous for being the terminus point for the bus route number 1.\n

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Boar's Head Inn (Q28401926)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Boar's Head Inn was an inn at Southwark in London, owned by Sir John Fastolf, who is the source for the character-name of Falstaff. While the Eastcheap Boar's Head Inn is not known to have existed during the reign of Henry IV, this inn may have. \n

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1861 Tooley Street fire (Q28457135)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 1861 Tooley Street fire, also called the Great Fire of Tooley Street, started in Cotton's Wharf on Tooley Street, London, England, on 22 June 1861. The fire lasted for two weeks, and caused £2\xa0million worth of damage. During the fire, James Braidwood, superintendent of the London Fire Engine Establishment, was killed. House of Commons reports cited multiple failures in fire prevention, and the fire led to the 1865 Metropolitan Fire Brigade Act, which established the London Fire Brigade.\n

"}
Hyde Group (Q28406472)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hyde Group is a housing association in London. It is a member of the G15. It operates in London, the South East, the East of England and the East Midlands.\n

'}
Holland's Leaguer (Q30039521)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Holland\'s Leaguer was the name of a Dutch English brothel in London between 1603 and January 1632. It has been referred to as the most famed brothel in 17th-century England. "Legeur" means military encampment.

'}
Browning Hall (Q27058563)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Browning Hall, properly The Robert Browning Settlement, was a social settlement established in Walworth, London, in 1895, one of a number of such 'settlements' arising out of the settlement movement and the university extension movement. It provided a range of social services to the poor of its deprived area, and provided accommodation enabling relatively well-educated people to live amongst the people with whom they worked.\n

"}
Montague Close (Q28963206)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Montague Close is a street in London, England, close to London Bridge in London SE1, within the London Borough of Southwark.

'}
Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (Q1321660)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF) was established in 1967 as an international body linking the activities of National MS societies around the world. The Federation seeks to work in worldwide partnership with Member Societies and the international scientific community to eliminate multiple sclerosis and its consequences, and to speak out globally on behalf of those affected by multiple sclerosis.\n

'}
CentreComm (Q15208505)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\n\nCentreComm, now known as the NMCC (Network Management Control Centre) is Transport for London's emergency control room for London Buses. CentreComm's primary purpose is to provide an emergency control centre for London Buses contracted bus network. It is co-located with Transport for London's LSTCC centre which control London's traffic lights and traffic flow.\n

"}
Dog and Duck (Q15214448)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Dog and Duck was a tavern built upon St George's Fields in London in the 17th century. It was named after the sport of duck-baiting, that took place in adjacent wetland. In the 18th century its gardens were used as a spa but, by the 1770s, with spas no longer fashionable, it declined into a rowdy location for concerts. The magistrates refused to renew its licence, despite protracted legal disputes, and it closed in 1799. The building was then used as a School for the Indigent Blind and demolished in 1812, when the new Bethlem Hospital was built upon the site. That building is now used by the Imperial War Museum.\n

"}
A201 road (Q9294305)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The A201 is an A road in London running from Kings Cross to Bricklayer's Arms.\n

"}
William Curtis Ecological Park (Q8007399)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\nThe William Curtis Ecological Park was the United Kingdom's first urban ecology park.\n

"}
Long Lane (Q15030877)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Long Lane is a major road in Southwark, south London, England. At the northwest end is a complicated junction with Borough High Street, Marshalsea Road, Tabard Street, and Great Dover Street. The historic St George the Martyr church, with Dickensian connections, is at this junction, now standing on an island surrounded by roads and cut off from its original churchyard. In this church the eponymous Dickens character Little Dorrit was baptised and married. Charles Dickens himself lodged close by as a child in Lant Street when his father was in the Marshalsea debtors' prison during 1824. It was a traumatic period of his life. Also at this junction is the Borough Underground station.\n

"}
Camberwell Grove (Q15206915)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Camberwell Grove is a residential street in Camberwell, London, England, in the Borough of Southwark. It follows the line of a grove of trees, hence the name. The street once led from a Tudor manor house south to the top of a hill, which afforded a view of the City of London, approximately three miles to the north. Today, the grove is part of Camberwell Grove Conservation area.

'}
Downings Roads Moorings (Q15214939)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Downings Roads Moorings is a mooring for barges on the River Thames near Tower Bridge that is home to a small community of houseboat dwellers in Central London. In 2003 and 2004, they were threatened with eviction by Southwark Council. The members of the community appealed. The then Mayor of London Ken Livingstone commented in a letter to Southwark Council that "The principle of retaining the moorings is supported by the London Plan policy 4C.19 and supporting text contained in paragraphs 4.117 and 4.118. The mix of uses proposed for these moorings should be seen as broadly acceptable in the context of a multi functional Blue Ribbon Network as long as there are appropriate amenity and environmental safeguards in place.". Their eviction was quashed in late 2004.

'}
Newington Butts (Q15030884)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Newington Butts is a former hamlet, now an area of the London Borough of Southwark, that gives its name to a segment of the A3 road running south-west from the Elephant and Castle junction. The road continues as Kennington Park Road leading to Kennington; a fork right is Kennington Lane, leading to Vauxhall Bridge. Michael Faraday was born in Newington Butts. \n

'}
Westminster Bridge Road (Q7989130)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Westminster Bridge Road is a road in London, England. It runs on an east–west axis and passes through the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark.\n

'}
Old Kent Road (Q14820036)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Old Kent Road is a major thoroughfare in South East London, England, passing through the London Borough of Southwark. It was originally part of an ancient trackway that was paved by the Romans and used by the Anglo-Saxons who named it Wæcelinga Stræt (Watling Street). It is now part of the A2, a major road from London to Dover. The road was important in Roman times linking London to the coast at Richborough and Dover via Canterbury. It was a route for pilgrims in the Middle Ages as portrayed in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, when Old Kent Road was known as Kent Street. The route was used by soldiers returning from the Battle of Agincourt.\n

"}
Blackfriars Road (Q15030879)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Blackfriars Road is a road in Southwark, SE1. It runs between St George's Circus at the southern end and Blackfriars Bridge over the River Thames at the northern end, leading to the City of London. Halfway up on the west side is Southwark Underground station, on the corner with The Cut. Opposite is Palestra, a large new office building which houses the Surface transport division of Transport for London.\n

"}
China Wharf (Q55076667)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

China Wharf is a grade II listed residential building in Bermondsey, in London. It was designed in 1982–83 by Piers Gough of CZWG.

'}
Swedish Quays (Q55076668)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Swedish Quays at 1–95 Rope Street, London, is a group of flats and houses that is Grade II listed with Historic England. It was built between 1996 and 1990 and designed by David Price and Gordon Cullen.

'}
St Giles' Hospital (Q60763595)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Giles' Hospital was a hospital located in Camberwell, London.\n

"}
St Thomas' Church (Q7591864)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Thomas Church, Southwark, London, England. The first church building was part of the original St. Thomas' Hospital which was located to the area around the present St Thomas Street, from the infirmary at St Mary Overie priory in 1212. The hospital was therefore also an Augustinian house. The hospital/conventual precinct became a parish no later than 1496. It was named after Thomas Becket whose cult pilgrimage to Canterbury began at London Bridge. The church was renamed St Thomas the Apostle following the abolition of the Becket cult in 1538 during the Reformation.\n

"}
Poured Lines (Q57195827)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Poured Lines is a 2006 painting by the British painter Ian Davenport. It is the largest painting to be publicly displayed outdoors in the United Kingdom. It is situated under the rail bridge at the western end of Southwark Street in London SE1.

'}
7 July 2005 London bombings (Q10818)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The 7 July 2005 London bombings, often referred to as 7/7, were a series of coordinated Islamic terrorist suicide attacks in London, England, that targeted commuters travelling on the city's public transport system during the morning rush hour.\n

"}
Lorrimore Square (Q15242882)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lorrimore Square is a 1.5-acre (0.6\xa0ha) garden square in the far south-west of Southwark, London, England, centred 500\xa0metres south-east of Kennington tube station. It is divided into four sections, a church with integrated drop-in centre; a small enclosed garden without paths; a public playground/gardens; and a basketball/netball pitch. One side of the square is classical architecture of four storeys, the other two sides — the fourth side marks the end of units on another road — are late 20th century rows of apartments of slightly lower height.\n

'}
Spike Surplus Scheme (Q16897239)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Spike Surplus Scheme was a community-run self-managed social centre in a squatted building in Peckham, South London. It was occupied in 1999 and provided a range of mostly free activities for local people until its eviction in 2009 by Southwark Council.\n

'}
Sacred Heart Catholic School (Q17052048)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sacred Heart Catholic School is a mixed Roman Catholic secondary school and sixth form located in the Camberwell area of the London Borough of Southwark, England.

'}
Grange Walk (Q16891846)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Grange Walk is a historic road in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark, in south London. It runs between Tower Bridge Road in the west and Neckinger in the east.\n

'}
Camberwell Cemeteries (Q16985972)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nThe two Camberwell cemeteries are close to one another in Honor Oak, south London, England. Both have noteworthy burials and architecture, and they are an important source of socioeconomic data in recording the historical growth and changing demography in the community for the Southwark area since 1855.

'}
Massacre of St George's Fields (Q15250634)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Massacre of St George\'s Fields occurred on 10 May 1768 when government soldiers opened fire on demonstrators that had gathered at St George\'s Fields, Southwark, in south London. The protest was against the imprisonment of the radical Member of Parliament John Wilkes for writing an article that severely criticised King George III. After the reading of the Riot Act telling the crowds to disperse within the hour, six or seven people were killed when fired on by troops. The incident in Britain entrenched the enduring idiom of "reading the Riot Act to someone", meaning "to reprimand severely", with the added sense of a stern warning. The phrase remains in common use in the English language.

'}
One Tree Hill, Honor Oak (Q16896192)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

One Tree Hill is a defining feature of Honor Oak, mostly in London Borough of Southwark but parts also in the London Borough of Lewisham. It includes a 7 hectare public park, local nature reserve and Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Grade 1, which is owned and managed by Southwark Council. Its name, and that of the Honor Oak area, derive from the Oak of Honor, a tree on the hill which marked the southern boundary of the Norman Honour of Gloucester.

'}
Newington Workhouse (Q15262154)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\nNewington Workhouse was a workhouse—an institution for indoor relief of the poor— at 182 Westmoreland Road (now Beaconsfield Road), Southwark, London.\n

'}
Lavender Pond (Q16894009)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Lavender Pond is a 2.5 acre local nature reserve in Rotherhithe in the London Borough of Southwark. It is owned by Southwark Council and managed by The Conservation Volunteers. The nature reserve has an area of woodland as well as the pond.

'}
Dulwich Upper Wood (Q16989175)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Dulwich Upper Wood is a 2.4 hectare local nature reserve and Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Grade 1, in Crystal Palace in the London Borough of Southwark. It is owned by Southwark Council and managed by the Trust for Urban Ecology.

'}
Borough Road Gallery (Q16150132)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Borough Road Gallery is an art gallery at London South Bank University on Borough Road in south London, England.\n

'}
The Rosary (Q16932407)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Rosary was a moated house built by King Edward II of England in Southwark, to the east of the southern end of London Bridge, opposite the Tower of London. \n

'}
Braganza Street drill hall (Q30624930)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Braganza Street drill hall is a military installation in Braganza Street, Walworth.\n

'}
Surrey Dispensary (Q26665303)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Surrey Dispensary was founded in 1777 to administer advice and medicine to the poor of the Borough of Southwark and places adjacent. It was once one of the largest dispensaries in south London.\n

'}
Event Communications (Q69692708)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Event Communications, or Event, is one of Europe's longest-established and largest museum and visitor attraction design firms; it is headquartered in London.

"}
Southwark Schools' Learning Partnership (Q7571164)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Southwark School's Learning Partnership is a collaboration of ten schools — seven state and three independent — based in Southwark, a borough of south London, England. The partnership was founded in 2003.\n

"}
549 Lordship Lane (Q26665439)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

549 Lordship Lane, also known as the Concrete House, is a house on Lordship Lane in East Dulwich, close to the junction with Underhill Road and opposite St Peter's Church. The Gothic Revival house is an early example of a modern domestic dwelling constructed of concrete. It became a grade II listed building in 1994.\n

"}
1-9, Hopton's Almshouses (Q17531328)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Hopton's Almshouses are almshouses and a committee room in Southwark, London, SE1 at Hopton Gardens, 10–11 Hopton Street, all of which are Grade II* listed.

"}
London Fire Brigade (Q3091309)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London. It was formed by the Metropolitan Fire Brigade Act 1865, under the leadership of superintendent Eyre Massey Shaw.\n

'}
Kaplan Law School (Q6366824)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Kaplan Law School was a for-profit educational institution offering post-graduate legal training in London for those wishing to become a solicitor in England and Wales. As of April 2016, it announced the closure of all programmes to new applicants, effectively ending the schools activities.\n

'}
East Dulwich (Q3305828)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

East Dulwich is an area of south East London, England in the London Borough of Southwark. It forms the eastern part of Dulwich, with Peckham to the east and Camberwell to the north. This south London suburb was first developed in the nineteenth century on land owned by Alleyn's College.

"}
King's Health Partners (Q6410963)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

King's Health Partners is an academic health science centre located in London, United Kingdom. It comprises King's College London, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

"}
Hannibal House (Q5649170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Hannibal House is an icon of 1960s office architecture positioned above the Elephant and Castle shopping centre in Southwark, south London.\n

'}
London Bridge – Greenwich Railway Viaduct (Q6669896)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The London Bridge – Greenwich Railway Viaduct consists of a series of nineteen brick railway viaducts linked by road bridges between London Bridge railway station and Deptford Creek, which together make a single structure 3.45 miles (5.55\xa0km) in length. The structure carries the former London and Greenwich Railway line and consists of 851 semi-circular arches and 27 skew arches or road bridges. It is the longest run of arches in Britain, It is also one of the oldest railway viaducts in the world, and the earliest example of an entirely elevated railway line. It was built between 1834 and 1836. The original viaduct had been widened for 1.95 miles (3.14\xa0km) of its length between Corbett's Lane and London Bridge on the south side to accommodate the trains of the London and Croydon Railway and London and Brighton Railway, in 1842 and also for 2.65 miles (4.26\xa0km) on the north side to accommodate the South Eastern Railway main line in 1850. It is a Grade II listed structure.

"}
Heygate Estate (Q5749722)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Heygate Estate was a large housing estate in Walworth, Southwark, South London comprising 1214 homes. The estate was demolished between 2011 and 2014 as part of the urban regeneration of the Elephant and Castle area. Home to more than 3,000 people, it was situated adjacent to Walworth Road and New Kent Road, and immediately east of the Elephant and Castle road intersection. The estate was used extensively as a filming location, due in part to its brutalist architecture.\n

'}
Marsyas (Q6627731)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Marsyas is a 150-meter-long, ten storey high sculpture designed by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond. It was on show at Tate Modern gallery, London in 2003 and was commissioned as part of the Unilever Series. Marsyas was the third in a series of commissions for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall and the first to make use of the entire space.

'}
Honor Oak railway station (Q5896828)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Honor Oak railway station was a station opened in December 1865 in Honor Oak, London by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway on the Crystal Palace and South London Junction Railway. The line was built to carry passengers to The Crystal Palace after its move from Hyde Park. The station featured two wooden platforms, and apart from two brief closures during World War I and World War II, it remained open until 1954 when the entire branch line was closed. The station was demolished, and only the station master's house remains today.\n

"}
Beargarden (Q4876722)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Beargarden or Bear Pit was the facility for bear-baiting, bull-baiting, and other "animal sports" in the London area during the 16th and 17th centuries, from the Elizabethan era to the English Restoration period. Samuel Pepys visited the venue in 1666 and described it as "a rude and nasty pleasure". The last recorded event at the Beargarden was the baiting of "a fine but vicious horse" in 1682.\n

'}
Camberwell Collegiate School (Q5025051)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

\n\nThe Camberwell Collegiate School was an independent school in Camberwell, London, England. It was located on the eastern side of Camberwell Grove, directly opposite the Grove Chapel.

'}
Beltwood House (Q4884815)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Beltwood House is a Grade II listed building within the Dulwich Wood Conservation Area in south London, England. The large three-storey mansion has fifty rooms and stands in 1.24 hectares (3.1 acres) of wooded grounds, with gatekeeper's lodge, a tennis court and a croquet lawn. The site has been subject to a blanket tree preservation order since 1985.

"}
Bermondsey (Q4892580)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Bermondsey (also known as St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey) was a parish in the metropolitan area of London, England.\n

'}
Blackfriars Bridge railway station (Q4922902)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Blackfriars Bridge railway station was on the City branch of the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LC&DR) in London, England. It was opened on 1 June 1864 and, for its first six months, was the northern terminus of a line from Herne Hill via Loughborough Junction.

'}
Borough Compter (Q4946306)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

\n\nThe Borough Compter was a small compter or prison initially located in Southwark High Street but moved to nearby Tooley Street in 1717, where it stood until demolished until 1855. It took its name from 'The Borough', a historic name for the Southwark area of London on the south side of the River Thames from the City of London. This replaced a lock-up as part of the City's court house under the jurisdiction of the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen of the City, and their High-Bailiff of Southwark. This first court house was converted from the old parish church of St Margaret's. A floor was made across the level of the church's gallery and the windows below that were blocked in, the Court Room being on the first floor. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of Southwark in 1676.

"}
Bramah Tea and Coffee Museum (Q4956083)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Bramah Tea and Coffee Museum was a museum in southeast London. It was the world's first museum devoted to the history of tea and coffee, covering 400 years of commercial and social history of two commodities, since their arrival in Europe from Africa and the Far East. \n

"}
Camberwell Public Baths (Q5025062)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Camberwell Public Baths (also Camberwell Baths and recently Camberwell Leisure Centre) opened in 1892 and has been in continuous operation as publicly funded community baths and more recently as a public leisure centre.\n

'}
Camberwell railway station (Q5025066)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Camberwell is a closed railway station in Camberwell, South London, England. It opened in 1862 but was closed to passengers in 1916 and closed to all traffic in 1964. The possibility of the station's re-opening has been raised in recent years.\n

"}
Walworth Road railway station (Q7966878)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Walworth Road railway station was a railway station in Walworth Road, Southwark, south London, England, on the London Chatham & Dover Railway, which opened on 1 May 1863 on the route of the company's ambitious plan to extend into the City of London. It was originally known as Camberwell Gate before changing its name in 1865.\n

"}
Newington (Q3046636)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Newington is a district of South London, just south of the River Thames, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. It was an ancient parish and the site of the early administration of the county of Surrey. It was the location of the County of London Sessions House from 1917, in a building now occupied by the Inner London Crown Court.\n

'}
E-ACT (Q16151476)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

E-ACT is a multi-academy trust responsible for 28 academies in England.

'}
Muscular Dystrophy Campaign (Q16998293)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Muscular Dystrophy UK is a UK charity focusing on muscular dystrophy and related conditions. They seek to cure or find treatments for muscular dystrophy and other muscle-wasting conditions, and to improve the lives of those affected.\n

'}
Surrey Theatre (Q16900939)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Surrey Theatre, London began life in 1782 as the Royal Circus and Equestrian Philharmonic Academy, one of the many circuses that provided entertainment of both horsemanship and drama (hippodrama). It stood in Blackfriars Road, near the junction with Westminster Bridge Road, just south of the River Thames in what is now the London Borough of Southwark.\n

'}
School for the Indigent Blind (Q16897147)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

SeeAbility (formerly School for the Indigent Blind and Royal School for the Blind) is a UK charity that provides support and campaigns for better eye care for people with learning disabilities, autism and sight loss. In 2017 it reported that 236 people were supported in facilities such as residential homes, supported living and activity and resource centres across the south of England. From 2013, SeeAbility launched its Children in Focus campaign, providing sight tests for children in special schools, after observing that many adults they worked with had not received good eye care when younger.

'}
Herne Hill (Q146553)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Herne Hill is a district in south London, England, approximately four miles from Charing Cross and bordered by Brixton, Denmark Hill, Dulwich Village, Loughborough Junction and Tulse Hill. It overlaps the boundary between the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. There is a road of the same name in the area (which is part of the A215 and was formerly called Herne Hill Road), as well as a railway station.\n

'}
West Dulwich (Q145753)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

West Dulwich ( DUL-itch) is an area in south London, England, which straddles the London Borough of Lambeth and the London Borough of Southwark. Croxted Road and South Croxted Road mark the boundary between Southwark to the east and Lambeth to the west. The suburb of West Dulwich dates back to the 17th century when the often flooded land known as Dulwich Common was acquired and drained by Edward Alleyn\'s estate.\n

'}
Jacob's Island (Q1677777)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Jacob's Island was a notorious slum in Bermondsey, London, in the 19th century. It was located on the south bank of the River Thames, approximately delineated by the modern streets of Mill Street, Bermondsey Wall West, George Row and Wolseley Street. Jacob's Island developed a reputation as one of the worst slums in London, and was popularised by the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist, published shortly before the area was cleared in the 1860s.\n

"}
London Dungeon (Q1513107)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction along London's South Bank, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.\n

"}
River Neckinger (Q1973802)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The River Neckinger is a reduced subterranean river that rises in Southwark and flows approximately 2.5 kilometers through that part of London to St Saviour's Dock where it enters the Thames. What remains of the river is enclosed and runs underground and most of its narrow catchment has been diverted into other combined and surface water sewers, flowing into the Southern Outfall Sewer and the Thames respectively.\n

"}
Hope Theatre (Q1860179)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Hope Theatre was one of the theatres built in and around London for the presentation of plays in English Renaissance theatre, comparable to the Globe, the Curtain, the Swan, and other famous theatres of the era.

'}
Flat Time House (Q28407491)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Flat Time House was the studio home of British conceptual artist John Latham (1921–2006) and is now open as a contemporary art gallery, centre for alternative learning and artist residency space, housing the John Latham archive. It is located on Bellenden Road, South London, England. It is a registered charity under English law.

'}
Great North Wood (Q1231487)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Great North Wood was a natural oak woodland that started three miles (4.8\xa0km) south-east of central London and scaled the Norwood Ridge. At its full extent, the wood's boundaries stretched almost as far as Croydon and as far north as Camberwell. It had occasional landownings as large clearings, well-established by the Middle Ages such as the hamlets of Penge and Dulwich.\n

"}
Crown Prosecution Service (Q1141790)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is the principal public agency for conducting criminal prosecutions in England and Wales. It is headed by the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP).\n

'}
Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart (Q26676955)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart is a Roman Catholic church on Knatchbull Road and Camberwell New Road in Camberwell, south east London, SE5.\n

'}
Dulwich Old College War Memorial (Q26672954)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Dulwich Old College War Memorial is located in the forecourt of Dulwich Old College on College Road in Dulwich in the London Borough of Southwark. It marks the deaths of the former pupils of the college who died in the First World War between 1914 and 1919. The memorial is made from Hopton Wood stone and was designed by William Douglas Caröe. It was unveiled in 1921. It has been grade II listed on the National Heritage List for England since May 2010. The heritage listing places the memorial within a "visual and contextual relationship" with the Grade II listed Old College building and the entrance gates and piers of the Old College, also Grade II listed.

'}
Dulwich College War Memorial (Q26672953)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Dulwich College War Memorial is located at the eastern front of Dulwich College on College Road in Dulwich in the London Borough of Southwark. It commemorates the alumni of the college who died in both the First and Second World Wars. The memorial was designed by W. H. Atkin-Berry, an alumnus of the college. It was unveiled on 17 June 1921, the Dulwich College Founder\'s Day, by Major General Sir Webb Gillman, and dedicated by the Dean of Durham, James Welldon. Gillman was an alumnus of the college, and Welldon had served as Master of Dulwich College from 1883 to 1885. It has been Grade II listed on the National Heritage List for England since May 2010. The heritage listing places the memorial within a "visual and contextual relationship" with the Grade II* listed Main College building.

'}
Southwark St John Horsleydown (Q7571168)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark St John Horsleydown was a small parish on the south bank of the River Thames in London, opposite the Tower of London. The name Horsleydown, apparently derived from the "horse lie-down" next to the river, is no longer used. The parish was created by splitting St Olave\'s parish in 1733.\n

'}
Southwark St Saviour (Q7571170)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark St Saviour ( SUDH-ərk) was a civil parish in the metropolitan area of London, England, and part of the ancient Borough of Southwark. It was formed in 1541 from the union of the parishes of St Margaret and St Mary. It was abolished in 1930, however residents of the former parish receive a rebate against local taxation because of the presence of Borough Market.\n

'}
St George's Fields (Q7593169)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St George's Fields was an area of Southwark in south London, England.

"}
St Michael's Catholic College (Q7594730)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Michael's Catholic College is a coeducational secondary school with academy status, located in the London district of Southwark.\n

"}
Sydenham Hill (Q7659776)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Sydenham Hill forms part of a longer ridge and is an affluent locality in southeast London. It is also the name of a road which runs along the northeastern part of the ridge, demarcating the London Boroughs of Southwark, Bromley and the Lewisham. Its highest part is the apex of the Boroughs of Southwark and Lewisham and the 15th-highest peak in London, at 367 feet (112\xa0m).\n

'}
Surrey Commercial Docks (Q2368643)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Surrey Commercial Docks were a large group of docks in Rotherhithe, South East London, England, located on the south bank (the Surrey side) of the River Thames. \n

'}
St Olave's Hospital (Q7594991)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Olave's Hospital was a general hospital serving the Rotherhithe area of London until its closure in 1985.\n

"}
Surrey Chapel (Q7646777)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Surrey Chapel (1783-1881) was an independent Methodist and Congregational church established in Blackfriars Road, Southwark, London on 8 June 1783 by the Rev. Rowland Hill. His work was continued in 1833 by the Congregational pastor Rev. James Sherman, and in 1854 by Rev. Newman Hall. The chapel's design attracted great interest, being circular in plan with a domed roof. When built it was set in open fields, but within a few years it became a new industrial area with a vast population characterised by great poverty amidst pockets of wealth. Recently the site itself has been redeveloped as an office block (currently occupied by the London Development Agency), and Southwark Underground Station has been built opposite.\n

"}
Spa Road railway station (Q7572152)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Spa Road railway station in Bermondsey, south-east London, was the original terminus of the capital's first railway, the London and Greenwich Railway (L&GR).\n

"}
Bankside (Q2660320)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Bankside is a district of London, England, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Bankside is located on the southern bank of the River Thames, 1.5 miles (2.4\xa0km) east of Charing Cross, running from a little west of Blackfriars Bridge to just a short distance before London Bridge at St Mary Overie Dock to the east which marks its distinct status from that of 'the Borough' district of Southwark. It is part of a business improvement district known as Better Bankside.\n

"}
The Swan (Q2625304)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Swan was a theatre in Southwark, London, England, built in 1595 on top of a previously standing structure, during the first half of William Shakespeare's career. It was the fifth in the series of large public playhouses of London, after James Burbage's The Theatre (1576) and Curtain (1577), the Newington Butts Theatre (between 1575 and 1577) and Philip Henslowe's Rose (1587–88).\n

"}
Southwark St Olave (Q7571169)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Southwark St Olave was an ancient civil and ecclesiastical parish on the south bank of the River Thames, covering the area around where Shard London Bridge now stands in the modern London Borough of Southwark. The boundaries varied over time but in general the parish stretched east from London Bridge past Tower Bridge to St Saviour's Dock. Southwark St Olave and St Thomas replaced the civil parish in 1896. It was abolished in 1904 and absorbed by Bermondsey parish.\n

"}
St Ann Blackfriars (Q7592469)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

St Ann Blackfriars was a church in the City of London, in what is now Ireland Yard in the ward of Farringdon Within. The church began as a medieval parish chapel, dedicated to St Ann, within the Dominican Black Friars church. The new parish church was established in the 16th century to serve the inhabitants of the precincts of the former Dominican monastery, following its dissolution under King Henry VIII. It was near the Blackfriars Theatre, a fact which displeased its congregation. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.\n

'}
St. Mary's Church, Rotherhithe (Q7590184)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Mary's Church, Rotherhithe, is the local Church of England parish church in Rotherhithe, formerly in Surrey and now part of south east London. The parish is now within the diocese of Southwark and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Fulham. The 18th-century church is in St\xa0Marychurch Street and is dedicated to Mary, mother of Jesus, and it is particularly proud of its connections with the Pilgrim Fathers. It remains a living and working church, supported by local people and serving a broad community.\n

"}
Marshalsea (Q2603875)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Marshalsea (1373–1842) was a notorious prison in Southwark, just south of the River Thames. Although it housed a variety of prisoners, including men accused of crimes at sea and political figures charged with sedition, it became known, in particular, for its incarceration of the poorest of London's debtors. Over half the population of England's prisons in the 18th century were in jail because of debt.

"}
SeOne (Q7439753)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

seOne was a nightclub in London, United Kingdom. It claimed to be London's largest licensed nightclub with a capacity of 3,000 people. It was located on Weston Street underneath the London Bridge transit centre. The licensing authority required the nightclub to scan and retain clubbers' ID details. seOne used Clubscan for this purpose. On 22 February 2010 it officially closed down due to financial difficulties.

"}
Southwark Christchurch (Q7571135)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark Christchurch was a parish in the metropolitan area of London, England. It was the manor and liberty of Paris Garden until 1670.

'}
Southwark St George the Martyr (Q7571167)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark St George the Martyr was a civil parish in the metropolitan area of London, England and part of the ancient Borough of Southwark. In 1855 the parish vestry became a local authority within the area of responsibility of the Metropolitan Board of Works. It comprised 284 acres (1.15\xa0km2) and had a population in 1881 of 59,712.

'}
Cross Bones (Q5188236)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Cross Bones is a disused post-medieval burial ground on Redcross Way in Southwark, south London. Up to 15,000 people are believed to have been buried there. It was closed in 1853.\n

'}
Pullens buildings (Q7259437)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Pullens Buildings, also known as the Pullens Estate, are some of the last Victorian tenement buildings surviving in London, England. In the Walworth, Newington area, they are near Elephant and Castle and Kennington Underground stations. Located in Amelia Street, Crampton Street, Iliffe Street, Penton Place and Peacock Street, they are protected by Conservation Area status granted by Southwark Council.

'}
Denmark Hill (Q5257939)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Denmark Hill is an area and road in Camberwell, in the London Borough of Southwark. It is a sub-section of the western flank of the Norwood Ridge, centred on the long, curved Ruskin Park slope of the ridge. The area and road is said to have acquired its name from Queen Anne's husband, Prince George of Denmark, who hunted there.

"}
Dulwich Public Baths (Q5313556)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Dulwich Public Baths (also Dulwich Leisure Centre) is a swimming pool and gym in Dulwich, South London. It opened in 1892, and is London's oldest public baths to have remained in continuous operation. The baths are listed Grade II on the National Heritage List for England.

"}
Dulwich Village (Q5313557)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

Dulwich Village is an area of Dulwich in South London's SE21 postcode area in England. It is located in the London Borough of Southwark.\n

"}
Commercial Dock railway station (Q5152489)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Commercial Dock was a railway station in Rotherhithe, south-east London, on the London and Greenwich Railway. It was situated on approximately the same site as the later Southwark Park railway station. Numerous sources disagree over when Commercial Dock station was opened, with July 1856, 1859, or 1867 being possibilities; it closed in 1867. No visible trace of the station remains.\n

'}
Nonsuch House (Q7049609)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Nonsuch House was a four-storey house on London Bridge, completed in 1579. It is the earliest documented prefabricated building. Originally constructed in the Netherlands, it was taken apart and shipped to London in pieces in 1578, where it was reassembled, with each timber being marked so that it could be reconstructed correctly. It was assembled in the manner later typical of an American barn or modern prefab housing. The name Nonsuch may have referred to Henry VIII\'s now vanished Nonsuch Palace outside London; it meant there was "none such" anywhere else, that it was an unequalled paragon of its kind.\n

'}
Metro Central Heights (Q6824538)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Metro Central Heights is a group of residential buildings in Walworth in the London Borough of Southwark. It was originally known as Alexander Fleming House, a multi-storey office complex designed by Hungarian-born modernist architect Ernő Goldfinger and constructed in the early 1960s for Arnold Lee of Imry Properties. The design was favoured both by the property developer Imry and by the London County Council as it promised the largest amount of lettable space and therefore the best financial return for the site. Some 55 m tall at its highest point, the original scheme consisted of three freestanding blocks, two of seven storeys and one of eighteen, grouped around a central piazza. \n

'}
Old Kent Road railway station (Q7084318)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Old Kent Road was a railway station on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway line in south London which took its name from the Old Kent Road on which it was located. The station opened on 13 August 1866 on a viaduct and bridge crossing the road at a junction with a line to London Bridge station and what became Surrey Quays station on the East London Line and Queens Road Peckham station on the South London Line. \nThe station was renamed in 1870 to Old Kent Road and Hatcham. The passenger train service to the East London was withdrawn on 1 June 1911 and the track was removed in 1912. The station closed temporarily on 1 January 1917 during the First World War as an economy measure, but was never reopened after the end of the war.\n

'}
Old College Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (Q7083719)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Old College Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club is in West Dulwich, Southwark, southeast London, England, to the east off Gallery Road. The "Old College" name was adopted due to its longstanding close association with Dulwich College, its president often being the college Master.

'}
Wikimedia UK (Q7999857)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Wikimedia UK (WMUK) is a registered charity established to support volunteers in the United Kingdom who work on Wikimedia projects such as Wikipedia. As such, it is a Wikimedia chapter approved by the Wikimedia Foundation, which owns and hosts those projects.\n

'}
West Square (Q7986571)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

West Square is a historic square in south London, England, just south from St George's Road. The square is within the London Borough of Southwark, but as it is located in postcode SE11, it is commonly said to be in Lambeth.\n

"}
XXL (Q8042597)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

XXL was a gay nightclub in London and Birmingham which catered to the bear sub-group. The club was founded by Mark Ames and his then partner David Dindol in 2000. They separated in 2005, after which Mark purchased his ex-partner\'s share of the club. It was the largest dedicated "bear" venue in the United Kingdom and the world. It was not just the bear scene\'s longest-running weekly disco but London\'s too, having not missed a night in over 16 years.\n

'}
Southwark Park railway station (Q15138374)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Southwark Park was a railway station in Bermondsey, south-east London, on the Greenwich Line between Spa Road and Deptford. It was opened by the South Eastern and Chatham Railway on 1 October 1902, on approximately the same site as the then long-closed Commercial Dock railway station. It was close to the southern end of Southwark Park, from which it took its name. South Bermondsey railway station, on the South London Line, is nearby.

'}
Winston Churchill's Britain At War Experience (Q8026052)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Winston Churchill's Britain at War Experience was a themed museum located in central London, which recalled the London Blitz.\n

"}
London School of Musical Theatre (Q15242665)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The London School of Musical Theatre (LSMT) is an academy of performing arts that has provided training since 1995.\n

'}
London Underground (Q20075)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The London Underground (also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving London region, England and some parts of the adjacent counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom.

'}
St Saviour's War Memorial (Q23646694)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

St Saviour's War Memorial is a war memorial on Borough High Street, in the former parish of Southwark St Saviour, to south of the River Thames in London. It became a Grade II listed building in 1998 and was upgraded to Grade II* in 2018.\n

"}
Museum of Life Sciences (Q23891179)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Museum of Life Sciences is a life science and natural history museum that is part of King's College London in London, England. It is housed on the Guy's Campus, adjacent to the Gordon Museum of Pathology in the Hodgkin Building. It was founded in 2009 and is the first new museum in King's College for over 100 years. It exists to explain the diversity of animal and plant life in the context of the biological and health sciences. The current curator is Dr Gillian Sales.

"}
Gordon Museum of Pathology (Q21592481)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

The Gordon Museum of Pathology is a medical museum that is part of King's College London in London, England. It is one of the largest pathology museums in the world and is the largest medical museum in the United Kingdom. Its primary function is to train medical, dental, biomedical and healthcare students and professionals to diagnose diseases.\n

"}
Glenlea (Q26665253)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Tappern House (formerly known as Glenlea) on Dulwich Common Road, in Dulwich in Southwark, south east London, is a detached house that was designed by George Tappern, the surveyor of Dulwich College. It has been Grade II listed on the National Heritage List for England since September 1972.

'}
Howlettes Mead (Q26665193)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

Howlettes Mead is a Grade II listed detached house at 48 College Road in Dulwich Village, in the London Borough of Southwark, SE 21. The house is set in 2 acres of grounds. It was built in 1777 and altered in the early 19th-century. The house has 3 storeys with 2 main bays and a porch with Doric pilasters

'}
MOCA, London (Q6716967)
{'lang': , 'extract': '

The Museum of Contemporary Art, London is a small art gallery in Peckham Rye, London. Its director is Michael Petry.

'}
Statue of Thomas Guy (Q26665639)
{'lang': , 'extract': "

A statue of Thomas Guy stands in the forecourt of Guy's Hospital in the borough of Southwark in Central London. The statue is Grade II listed.\n

"}